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PAGE 6 




ISCROLLY TEXT EDITOR 



|_ 




APRIL/MAY £1.50 



Track the sun's rays 
v/ith Sunplotter 




THE ONLY MAGAZINE 

COVERING XL/XE 

AND ST 

MACHINES 



CAN THE XL/XE BEAT 
THE ST AT CHESS? 
WE TRY IT OUT 



NEW SERIES ON MACHINE CO 
TURBO BASIC TUTORIAL 
PARTADOS X REVIE' - 



Cfl5 Vrf4«t*r tfD 

ATAffl CASSEi 



COLOS; 
!CHES° 



PROTEXT 
FANTASY.. 
JOAN OF ARC 
HEADCOACH 
'01 FOR THE LAYMAN 



ATARI USER 



LAST CHANCE 

OFFERS FINISH THIS ISSUE 



OFFERS 



ATARI USER BACK ISSUES 

Your LAST chance to get the ATARI USER back issues for 
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Price includes postage in UK. Overseas add £3 for postage- 
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ber your program, DIR Disk drive direc- 
lory, VAL converts hex/dec /binary, GlR 
Calculates Atari User checksums, LVAR 
Lists all variables. CHANGE Alters names 
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reduces program size and LISTING pro- 
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The best language for every Atari User. Speeds 
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just have the picture to make things a little harder. 
Written by a primary school teacher for youngsters 
for 3 years and up, this will give your child a good 
start with words. 

Cassette £4.95 Disk £6.95 



'The magazine 

for the Dedicated 

Atari User' 




BLASTCOM 
Another machine 
language game! 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 
Annual subscription rated (6 issues) 

UK £9,00 

Europe £13.50 

Elsewhere (sea} £13-50 

Elsewhere (Air) £21.00 



PAGE 6 ON DISK 

A disk containing all ot the 8-bit 
programs from each issue of PAGE 6 
is available either separately or on 
subcription. Single price £2.95 per 
disk, Subscription rates [6 issues) 



UK 

Europe 

Elsewhere (sea J 
Elsewhere (Atr) 



£24.00 

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Please 

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SUBMISSIONS 

PAGE 5 welcomes and encourages ils read- 
ers to submii, articl&s, programs and reviews 
for publication. Programs must be submitted 
on disk or cassette, articles should whenever 
possible be submitted as laxi files on disk. We 
seek to encourage your participation and do 
nol have strict rules tor submissions. If some- 
thing interests you. write a program of ariicte 
and submit it! Appropriate payment will be 
made for all published programs and articles. 

All original articles, programs and o^her mate- 
rial in PAGE £ is e#py*ight 01 Vie aulhor as 
credited. Ail uncrediled material is copyright 
PAGE 6. Unless containing the byline "All 
Rights Reserved' any material m PAGE 6 may 
be reproduced |>y User Grojps and other 
rton-profit making organisations provided 1ha1 
the author's name is included and PAGE 6 is 
credited as the original publisher, Permission 
to publish elsewhere should bs obtained from 
PAGE 6 or the author. Edhors Qi newsletters 
reproducing male rial are requested to send a 
copy of the relevant issue to the Editorial 
address of PAGE 6. Whilst we take whatever 
steps we can to ensure the accuracy d arti- 
cles and programs and the contents of advef- 
tteemenls, PAGE 6 cannot oe held liable for 
any errors or claims made by advertisers. 

ATARI (TM) 15 a registered Irademark of 
ATARI CORP. All references should be so 
noted. PAGE 6 is an independent publication 
and has no connection with Atari or with any 
olNer company or publisher. 



The next issue of 
NEW ATARI USER 
will be on sale 25th May. 
Editorial copy date is 17th April 



CONTENTS 



Issue 37 April/May 1989 



BLASTCOM by Karl Fenwick 13 

A fast and furious machine code game TYPE-IN LISTING 

CAN DAVID BEAT GOLIATH? by John S Davison 16 

XL versus ST at chess 

FINDER by Robert De Letter 18 

A utility to trace keywords TYPE-IN LISTING 

MACHINE CODE LIBRARY by Stephen Williamson 20 

Add machine code routines to your programs 



24 

26 

TYPE-IN LISTING 
DISK BONUS 29 

30 
TYPE-IN LISTING 

34 

36 

TYPE-IN LISTING 
40 
42 
47 



S PART ADOS X reviewed by John S Davison 

Great new support from ICD 

SUN PLOTTER by Pefer Scott Welch 

Trace the time and sunset across the world 

UNDER STARTERS ORDERS 

AMAZING by Trevor P r erde r gc5t 

Picking yp diamonds, avoiding lightning 

TUTORIAL SUBROUTINES by Ian Fmbyscn 

A cassette based database 

SCROLLY TEXT EDITOR by Bryan Kennerley 

Can you beat the world record scroll? 

RANDOM NOTES by Mark Hutchinson 

TURBO BASIC TUTORIAL by Gordon Cameron 

SOFTWARE REVIEWS 

Speed Run .■ 2AP-PAK ,. Super Soccer » Stratosphere ,. 
Periscope up .* Leapster 



ST FILE 



PROTEXT reviewed by Piper 
The ST's most best word processor 
JOAN OF ARC reviewed by John Sweeney 
JUST WHAT IS MIDI? by John S Davison 
Now series for th* lay musician 

FLAIR PAINT reviewed by John S Davison 

GAMES REVIEWS 
Too many to mention! 

TIME ONLY FOR HEROES I Sweeney 

Two new Fantasy Role Ploying games 

HEADCOACH by Damon Howofth 

No flashy graphics, but a great simulation 

SPRITE MASTER reviewed by Damon Howarth 



Editorial 

News 

Listing Conventions 

CONTACT 



4 Mailbag 

6 Resource File 

8 

46 BACK ISSUES 



52 

54 
56 

59 
60 

68 

70 

73 

10 
74 

50 



EdttortBl address; P.O. Box 54, Stafford, ST16 iDft, ENGLAND Tel. 078s 213920 
Editor & Publisher: Us Elllngham - Advertising Sandy EllinQham - Assistant: Stacey Mitchell 

Printed by Stephens & George, Merthyr Tydfil 0665 5351 . Typesetting by The Setting Studio CS1 £22 1517 
Origination (film, plaining) by Ebony 0579 46880 ■ Newstrade Distribution Diamond En repress. Unit 1 . 
Burgess Road, Ivy bouse Lane. Hastings, E. Sussex TN35 4NR Tel. 0424 430422 
PAGE 6 ATARI USER is published bi-monthly on the last Thursday of t!w monlti prior to cover dale 




Issue 37 
April/May 1989 

'The Magazine for 
the Dedicated Atari User' 

[SSN No- 0952-4967 



THE CREDITS 

All of the usual stuff is on page 3 but hen? 
ore the people who made this issue possible. 

Les F.ILiny horn did the editing. Layout etc, 

Sandy looked after the advertising 

Stacey did aJl those things around the office 
without which we would not survive (espe- 
cially making the Editor's coffee!) 

Thanks also to John R. Banister for coming 
in Lu help us oul 

The Regular Contributors, who provide thp 
backbone of the magazine* and can general- 
ly be relied upon to come up with good 
articles and reviews, are .... 



Garry Francis 
Matthew fones 
John Davison )r 
Paul Kixon 



Mark Hutchinson 
jahn Davison 
Juhrt Sweeney 
Damon Hvwarth 



All other contributor* for this issue ore Indi- 
vidually credited alongside their articles or 
pray rams. Thanks to everybody for sharing 
their work and enthusiasm with other Atari 
users. 

Everybody keep* asking Where's Garry 
Francis V. So where are you Carry? 

inspiration for this issue com*:'** Iwlteve ii or noj. 
from Roy Qrbiwm rediscover^} via The Travelling 
Wiibenies. Ntuer a total fan of popular mask In 
the sixties t wouldn't normally have dreomfld of 
listening to The Bio but Mystery Girl ii wry 
much of the eighties and has been constantly on 
the CD, in the car, down the office ... for weeks! 
flrilJtartfl Also Spike which is .growing on me as I 
write plus Martin Catthy, stilt amazingly good, and 
a ftosombfy pleasant excursion from Dylan and 
the Dead and a quick bit ofrioyd of the end. Van 
the man is still in fkrth, maybe next issue? 



Serious? You bet I But Atari is supposed to be 
fan as well isn't It? 

The next issue of PAGE & could feature 
YOUR article or program, so SEND IT I ML 



PACE 6 shows just what you can do wlih your Alan. Wtih 
th*r exception of final output on a Lirrorrflri and use of a 
repro camera for the t&tinQS and photo*, the magazine is 
prepared entirely with Mori based equipment and software 
- not a Sf&cintash or IBM irr stg/htt Hardware ttfffd Jnctaries 
130X1, 1050 db* drive, 81V disk drive, 4J0 rtttrift 
foccasjonarJ/.'Jr 0#> Interface, Nt'C A023 printer, l&iOST, 
$Ml24 Monitor, Atari 5M2Q4 hcrrtT disk drive. CumahO 1 
meg disk flVfrt; Epson RX100 printer, ffjwera fasrr jmrtfer, 
MiCrOSturTer printer buffer. Software fnrtodf.f fhuperscripi. 
Turbo EktfJc. Kermil, PC frU*rramnt TARf-lAlX Print Wh\ 
PC inlmjjrtif.fi, STWri\er r Promt and Fleet Street Publisher. 
Artirtcs and programs submitted an Xl/Xl disks arc sub- 
jected to various custom written programs before being 
transferred across to the ST via TARt'TALK. All major 
r:Jiiiria is done with Pratejtt andpaues are laid out with 
Fteet Street Publisher. A disk with ihc finished pages is vent 
up (o f he Setting Studio in tievtcastie to typesetting bureau 
who realty know what they are doing with theSTl to be 
output on a J.toa*™ 300 and. hey presto r finished pages 
are sent back tt really does work . at last! Alt JM is \eft is 
to drop in rhr listings and photos. Weft, it's not uuitr m 
map as that, but you get the ideal 



A LOAD OF RUBBISH? 



Its been quite interesting over the past 
couple of months with lots of letters 
coming ln f including a few from old 
Atari User readers saying what a load of 
rubbish Page 6 is' Now that is something 
that we have not had before and it can be 
quite upsetting opening the post in the 
morning after sitting up til] 2 o'clock doing 
the typesetting! You begin to wonder 
what's it's all for, especially when none of 
the writers actually say why ihey think it's 
a load of rubbish. Actually there have only 
been about half a dozen unhappy readers 
with the good comments outnumbering 
them by ten to one but it is always in- 
teresting to read criticisms. The only per- 
son to say why they didn't like the maga- 
zine was a young chap who complained 
that Page 6 was too serious, "just like read- 
ing a newspaper' and if that if the worst 
that can be said I am quite happyt Give 
me the choice between producing the Inde- 
pendent or the Beano (or The Sun) and I 
know which I'd choose, Page 6 always was 
serious folks because it was born out of a 
serious love for a great computer and it is 
hard to change just to satisfy the mass 
market, not that we want to change 
anyway. 

Many criticisms revolve around the fact 
that we cover both the XL/XE and the ST 
and come from those who seem to think 
that around 50 pages of 8 bit material 
with 20 pages of ST added on is somehow 
lefts than SO pages of 8 bit material on its 
awn. Others complain about the lack of 
colour, such as the guy who sarcastically 
started his letter along the lines of 'gosh a 
whole four pages of colour .. haven't you 
guys got it together' and then asked for 
our help with a problem t Your answer is 
on page 79. What everybody totally 
forgets is simple economics, it costs lots of 
money to produce lots of colour and most 
magazines get this from all those colour 
advertisements. Now Page 6 wants to go 
on supporting the Atari 8 bit as well as the 
ST but how many full colour adverts have 
you seen lately for 8 bit software? And 
because we support the 8 bit we don't get 
all the double page spreads from the com- 
panies that are only interested in the ST. 
Come to think of it how many advertisers 
are there altogether on the 8 bit scene? 
How much new software is there? 
How would you 8 bit users like a 100 
page, full colour magazine published 
every month? Yes? Okay, you find at least 
twenty five advertisers, ho If of whom will 
do full colour ads, at least 20 new software 
releases every month and sufficient other 
articles to Till it and then find 25 r QO0 peo- 
ple to buy the magazine and we'll do it for 
you. Until then enjoy the fact that we do 
support your Atari and just consider 



whether Database would have sold Atari 
User if it was their top selling title. 

IT'S NEW ATARI USER 

Ves P we will be changing the title of the 
magazine from the next issue despite all 
the sentimental reasons for not doing so 
The fact is that a new title will help us in 
the newsagents and with the computer 
trade and that mean$ we will be able to 
continue to support your Atari for much 
longer (and who knows if we sell a few 
more copies we might be able to add some 
of that colour). The problems that we face 
are illustrated by a chat to our main local 
newsagent who didn't have Page 6 Atari 
User in stock and informed me that Page 6 
was no longer being published (because 
the previous distributors had said they 
were no longer handling it) and that Atari 
User has ceased publication (which it had). 
We can' l afford to be ignored and the new 
title will clear things up. Thanks to every- 
one who wrote with their views and, yes, 
PAGE 6 will still be mentioned fairly prom- 
inently on the cover I 

SOME GREAT PROGRAMS 

Over the years we have- published some 
great programs and it is very pleasing 
when they keep coming in. This issue has 
somehow excited me more than any other 
recently because of the unique listings. 
Scrolly Text Editor is really great not only 
because it is a first for the 8 bit Atari but 
also because it lets 8 bit usera share in 
some of the 'traditions' of the ST and other 
computers and h perhaps most important of 
all h it lets users share things with each 
other. This is how the whole Atari scene 
started and is what has been lost by most 
magazine^ but we are proud to be able to 
continue the tradition of sharing your dis- 
coveries and achievements, however mod- 
est, with other users. The main listings are 
obvious ones to look out for but do check 
out the demos that accompany the 
Machine Code Library and Turbo Basic 
Tutorial they really are cracking and 
show what you can do if you follow the 
tutorials and keep learning about your 
Atari. Another program that deserves 
mention is the bonus on this issues' disk - 1 
have not had as much fun for ages and I 
guarantee that if you play Under Staters 
Orders with a couple of friends or family, 
you will all be jumping out of your seats! 
A parting thought. Is there any interest in 
getting the listings from PAGE 6 on tape? 
We have tried in the past hut the sales 
have been so low, it was not worth the 
trouble r are things different now? 

LesEl ling ham 



4 Page 6 - Issue 37 




'BOXED BRAND NEW 

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PARALLELSERIAL 

RS232 INTERFACES 

Few left - £55 



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' Built-in US Doubl&r (SpartaDos DompaiibleJ 

* Special editors to repair damaged protected disk 
software ar*d format disinlegrenion {For when you can'1 
get a replacement) 

h True <Joubie density (180k per side) 

* Plug-in module and 6 solder wires For easy _ _ _ _ _ 
installation ' £59-95 



CONTROLLER CARD PPB II 
'BACKUP PACK' 

Ifldudes "Superdunip Toolkit" which is suitable far making backups pf" prelected disk to disk 
software and upgrading cassette software to (M. Includes menu makor, sing e anc 
enhanse<3 density sactor txjpia*-.s that support 1he high speed ol modilied drives. h;and to 
speed backup dumpare, which includes 9 "save game in progress Facility" , pauser, immorta- 
ls** ulJidy, sy&lem ras&l commander so ya.. don'l have !a keep s.wilching ofl the computer 
In ra-boal and much morel! The Superdump- TooJfch is suhabla For ALL Atari disk drives. 

XL version £49,95 XE version £54.95 



ATARI XE130 CUSTOM all iiie features ot the standard 
130XE but includes a built-in printer interface, System reset commander so you 
don't Have to keep switching oft the computer to fa-bool. completely re- 
designed system character set with £ sign insiead ol the hash sign, high speed 
cursor routine, U.S. sy&lern colour defaults C70 Q^ 



STAR LC-10 PRINTER 

Epson compalible prinlers wi|h superb NLQ and very accurale 
linefeeds for graphics printing not normally found in Shis price range!! 

STAR LCMQ £195.00 STAR LC-24 £34900 SHEET FEEDER £59.95 
RIBBONS FOR: LC-10 E4.00 LC-24 E5.00 




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14, ROMILY COURT, LANDRIDGE ROAD, FULHAM, LONDON SW6 4LL 

Telephone 01-731 1276 

ACCESS - MASTERCARD - EUROCARD ACCEPTED 



EJ 




AUTO DUEL (Wfcl 16. 95 

DRUID ,12.35 

EURO SUPER SOCCER | Gill ..12.95 

F-15 STRIKE EAGLE 12.95 

FOUR GREAT GAMES II .... 5.35 
FOUR GREAT GAMES III ,- 5-95 

FOUR STAR GAMES I 5.95 

FOUR STAR GAMES II 5 95 

GUILD OF THIEVES (Mil .... 1MB 

INGRID5 BACK W 12,95 

JINXTER iMl ........ 16.95 

KENNEDY APPROACH ...... 12.35 

KNIGHT QRC (64k TEXT) ....16.95 

LANCELOT « 12.95 

LEADERBOARO ,12.95 

MIRAX FORCE 8.35 

MINI OFFICE II .,, 16.95 

RAMPAGE 12.95 

SILENT SERVICE 12.35 

SPYVS SPY TRILOGY ...... 12.95 

TIME S MAGIK |G4k TEXT1 ..12.95 
WINTER OLYMPIAD SB jHfc| ..12.95 



XL/XE CASSETTES 

ACE OF ACES ,.„ 2,95 

AMERICAN ROAD RACE .... 1.95 

ATARI ACES 6.95 

CALIFORNIA RUN 1,95 

DAWN RAIDER 195 

EURO SUPER SOCCER 164k) .. 8.95 

F-15 STRIKE EAGLE 8,95 

FOUR STAR GAMES I 3,95 

FOUR STAR GAMES II ...... 3.95 

GAUNTLET iW 2.95 

GRAND PRIX SIMULATOR .. 1.95 

INGRIDSBACKlMk) 12.95 

LANCELOTS ,„ 12.95 

LAS VEGAS CASINO ........ 2.95 

KENNEDY APPROACH 8-95 

KNIGHT ONC ptTECTl 12.95 

MIRAX FORCE 6.95 

PERISCOPE OP ,.„ 1.95 

PLATFORM PERFECTION |64ltf ..6-95 

QUARTET GOLD 3.95 

RAMPAGE 8.95 

SHOOT EM UPS \m ........ 6.95 

SPEED ACE 2,95 

SPYVS SPY TRILOGY 8.95 

TIME & MAG I KlM Teat 12-« 

VIDEO CLASSICS 195 

WINTER OLYMPIAD SB (Mfc| . 8.95 
ZYBEX 2.95 



Page 6 - Issue 37 



NEW ATARI XL/XE SUPPORT 



■Atari are demonstrating their 
support for the 3-bit machines 

by launching a new label 
which will include both ex- 
isting and new software at 
budget prices. The label was 
launched initially in the U.S. 
but the first two titles were on 
their way to the UK as we went 
to press. Existing software such 
as Thunderfox and Twilight 
World will now be available at 
£2.99 and the first of the new 
titles at this price is Nucleus 
said to be 'difficult to explain 
but totally addictive'. 
Full price software will also be 
produced by Atari commencing 
with Tiger Attack at £7,99 



which is said to be an XE ver- 
sion of the arcade game Flying 
Shark. These and other titles 
should be available now, hope- 
fully in the Atari Games Cen- 
tres and other stockists. Atari 
will be extending the Games 
Centres concept with more re- 
tailers being appointed. 
Meanwhile bock at Atari UK 
headquarters in Slough a group 
of employees have taken over a 
moil order operation called 
ATARI WORLD which was 
apparently set up by Atari 
eighteen months ago to provide 
support for the XL/XE 
machines. Although not parti- 
cularly prominent in the pa&t r 



r>oryl Still from Atari states 
that ATARI WORLD will be up 
and running shortly and prom- 
ises total S-bit support with all 
current software available at 
discount and goodies such as 
tee shirts,, badges and posters 
lined up. AVI currently produced 
Atari software will be available 
together with any third party 
software including educational 
titles, You need to become a 
member to participate and you 
will then receive regular mail- 
ings. You can get details by 
writing to R. Warner, Atari 
world Mail Order, Atari House, 
Railway Terrace r Slough, Berks 
SL2 5BZ. 



CRASH 
SIMULATOR? 



If you are into Flight Simulator 

If, don't yet into an XF551 disk 
drive, at least not yet. Various 
reports say that FS2 wont run 
on Atari's new drive. Sub Logic 

are, apparently, aware of the 
problem and are not too 
pleased that Atari didn't test 

the drive more fully before re- 
leasing it. Atari meanwhile are 
not about to start changing the 
drive so it look.s like Its down to 
Sub Logic to sort it out. If you 
have an XF551, best check be- 
fore buying FS2. 
We would be interested to 
learn of any other problems ex- 
perienced with the XF551 drive. 



NEW DATE FOR 
ATARI SHOW 



If you arc all ready to trek 
along to Alexandra Palace at 
the end of April for the next 
Atari Show hold fire a minute 
because the next show has 
beai put back to iune. We are 
not sure exactly why the date 
has been changed but under- 
stand that organisers Database 1 
Exhibitions have had long dis- 
cussions with Atari over their 
plans for the show and it was 
felt that a later date would be 
more beneficial to all concer- 
ned. More likely i$ the fact that 
Database are heavily involved 
in launching and promoting 



the first European Computer 
Trade Show which takes place 
on the weekend before the 
usual date for the Atari Show 
and it is unlikely that the orga- 
nisers could do justice to two 
shows on consecutive week- 
ends. Whatever, the show is on 
and you can come along to see 
PAGE 6 and other supporters of 
the Atari at Alexandra Palace 
from 23rd to 25th |une. Admis- 
sion is C5 with a £l discount if 
you book in advance. The Atari 
Xmas Show is also can firmed 
and will again be at Ally Pally 
from the 1st to 3rd December. 



THE AMIGA IS DEAD ... LONG 
LIVE THE 8 BIT ATARI! 



If you are a dedicated 8 bit 
owner sick of being told that 
the XL/XE is dead and gone 
then you might be very interes- 
ted in a little bit of news buried 
away in the bock of Computer 
Trade Weekly, This major trade 
paper carries a weekly chart of 
software sales compiled by Gal- 
lup and split between various 
machines. For the past year or 
so the Atari has been lan- 
guishing near the bottom out- 
sold by the ST and Amiga and 
occasionally even by the BBC 
and Electron but during Janu- 
ary sales of software for the 8 
bit Atari began to creep ap 
until the week ending 21st 
January saw a major triumph - 
Atari 8 hit sales 4.4%, Amiga 
sales 3.9%! The ST was still just 



ahead but only by 1%. 
Was It a fluke? No, the follow- 
ing week saw the Atari increas- 
ing sales to 4.9% still ahead of 
the Amiga and jiust a fraction 
behind the ST which stood at 
5%. Then came a drop in sales, 
Atari down to 4% but the ST 
and Amiga plummetted to just 
2.3% each I Loud cheers from 
Atari 8 bit users everywhere 
and a poke in the eye to all 
those software publishers that 
have steadfastly ignored the 
Atari over the past year. 
Next time someone tries £a tell 
you that your old Atari is obso- 
lete, you know what you can 
tell them and let's hope that a 
few of the software publishers 
take note and get some new 
releases out. 



OTHER SHOWS WORTH A VISIT? 



A couple of other shows might 
prove worth a visit especially if 
you happen to be near r al- 
though no details are available 

of what sort of support there 
might be for the Atari, The first 
is a one day show called The 
Alternative Micro Show held on 
Saturday 1st April at the New 
Horticultural Halt, Greycoat 
Street, London, SW1, This is 
aimed at the real hobbyist and 
is open to all micros except the 
ST, AMIGA and IBM* The 



organisers want to give support 
to those computers that are not 
grabbing all the limelight in 
the media and that will include 
the Atari 8 bit if any exhibitors 
are interested in turning up. 
Over in Essex from the 21st to 
23 rd April is The Essex Compu- 
ter Game Show, a show dedi- 
cated to those who just like to 
[]lay games and especially 
aimed at the younger enthu- 
siast. No details of exhibitors 
were available at the time of 



writing but the organisers have 
been working hard to get as 

wide a variety of machines sup- 
ported as possible and there 
should be some companies sup- 
porting Atari. 

Small shows like these were 
fairly common some years ago 
but disappeared when the PCW 
Show seemed to eat everything 
up. It is interesting that there 
now seems to be the demand 
again for the less formal show 
and hopefully these will pro- 



vide at least a small opportun- 
ity to promote the Atari E bit 
machines.. Best Idea, if you 
don't live round the corner, is 
to get in touch with the orga- 
nisers to see if there will be any 
Atari exhibitors, The Alterna- 
tive Micro Show is organised by 
Emsoft Ltd. who can be contac- 
ted on 0473 690729 and The 
Essex Computer Game Show is 
organised by Cambria Promo- 
tions whose number Is 0268 
694777. 



Page 6 - Issue 37 



NEW SOFTWARE 
COMING SOON 



Despite rumours to the con- 
trary, several of the companies 
thcit became famous for their 
Atari titles still have plans to 
support the 8 bit, Some In- 
teresting new titles for the XL/ 
XE are imminent including a 
couple that have been long 
rumoured and awaited. Tyne- 
soft should have The Last Guar- 
dian out by now and are work- 
ing on Superman which was 
due for release a\ the end of 
February. Zeppelin, up in the 
same part of the world, have 
Kenny Dalgleish's Football 
Manager an disk at £12.95 or 
on tope at £9.95 which has 
been written for the Atari by 
the same guy who wrote Draco- 
nus. Could be the most dyna- 
mic football manager game 
yet3 Zeppelin have also finished 
work on an Atari version of 
Star Wars which has been pas- 
sed over to Domark for release 
so keep your eyes, out in the 
glossies to see if the Atari ver- 
sion gets a mention. 

Level 9, who always include 
the Atari In their plans, have 




two new adventures on the 
way, Scape Ghost and another 
as yet unnamed, which are due 
for early summer release. 
Atlantis are working on a con- 
version of Gunfighler although 
the release date is not known 
and in the meanwhile won't 
hove any new Atari titles, not 
because they don't want to re- 
lease them but simply because 
they don't have any. Mike Cole 
from Atlantis told us "We cer- 
tainly want to continue sup- 
porting the Atari 8 bit but we 
just don't have any new prog- 
rams, if any of your readers 
have good quality games for 
the Atari ask them to get in 
toueh H r He added that they 
were quite disappointed as 
their Atari titles have always 
sold well and the Atari market 
is now Tjetter than ever". 

Postman Pat is still awaiting 
delivery from Alternative and is 
now scheduled for t around tas- 
ter". Apparently lots of prob- 
lems and delays, looks like it 
could be quite a good simula- 
tion! 



1 don't know, }e$s r 
it wouid have been 
completed much 
earlier if we hadn T 
asked the Reverend 
Trmm5 to do the 
programming 



BARGAIN CORNER 

At the request of one of our readers, J &N Bull Electrical sent 

through a couple of newsletters, packed with information about 
cheap electrical and electronic goodies such as stepper motors, 
hydraulic valves, switches and prongs but buried in it all were 
some reaf bargains for potential Atari owners. How do you fancy 
a brand new 65XE for £45 plus £3 delivery? Or an XC12 cassette 
for just £15 plus £2 postage? A new joystick for a fiver? And if 
you are into hacking there are dozens of electrical bargains for 
a few bob. 

We've no idea if these things are still available but it might be 
worth your while getting in touch with f Sr N Bull in case they 
have some more Atari bargains coming up. You can find them 
at 250 Portland Rood, Hove P Sussex, BN3 5QT and the phone 
number is 0273 734648, 






NEXT 
ISSUE 

LOOK OUT FOR 

NEW 

ATARI 

USER 

looking something like this . 



HLW 










I 



g5S5T^"SER. «u- 



STAR RIDER 



mum 



imuml 



■^ELftH 



M&cb.ttp using. Deffas Elite 

From Issue 38 Page 6 will change 

its title, but not its style - look out 

for NEW ATARI USER at your 

newsagents. On sale 25th May 

II you buy your copy from a 

newsagent tell him about the 

change of title and make sure that 

he has a copy for you 

HEW ATARI USER is distributed by 

Diamond Europress and should be at 

all major newsagents. Tell us if you can't find it 



Page 6 - Issue 37 






HOW TO TYPE IN THE LISTINGS 
and get them right! 



OUR UNIQUE LINE BY LINE CHECKER 
WORKS ON ALL ATARI XL/XE 
and earlier 8-bit machines 



The program listings In PAGE 6 ore prepared carefully to ensure that 
they can be typed in as. easily as possible. Before typing any listings 
ensure that you ore familiar with the use of the Shift and CONTROL 
and INVERSE keys as outlined in your computer manual. The listings 
are prepared to match exactly what you see on screen. Every character 
that you may see in a listing is Included in the chart below for cross 
reference. By using TYPO 3 you can ensure that you type in the 
programs EXACTLY as they are printed. Remember, a single typing 
mistake may mean a program will not run. 

WHAT ARE THOSE CODES? 

Each line of a program printed In PACT. 6 begins with a special two 
letter code, THESE SHOULD NOT BE TVPED IN They ore used by the 
program TYPO Xo c:hw:k Ihut vflu huvti lyptid each line correctly. IF 
YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY TYPED IN THE TYPO 3 LISTING PLEASE 
DO SO NOW. The program can be ii-sed as yon type in each line of a 
program or to check an already typed program. The code for each line 
will match but if you have problems check the listing conventions 
below carefully^ you are most probably typing a CONTROL character 
incorrectly. TYPO 3 cannot check whether a line has been missed so if 
you have problems in running a listing count the lines In the program 
and ensure none are missing. If the TYPO codes match and the 
program still does not run F LIST it to cassette or disk using LIST "Cr or 
LIST "^filename", switch off the computer, re-boot and then ENTER 
the program using ENTER "C" or ENTER "D: filename". Save this 
version In the normal way. 

HOW TO USE TYPO 3 

1, Type 10 the listing Ctfrtfully for although you can u*t> I VPO .1 to 

check Itself (see 6 below) it may not work if you have made 
mistakes. 

2 SAVE or CSA VE a copy of (he program. 

1. Each time you want to type in a program listing RUN TYPO 3 first. 
The program will install a machine cad& routine in memory and 
then delete itself. Now type In a line as shown in the magazine 
excluding the Rrtt two letter code and press RETURN. 

4. A two letter code will appear at the top left of your screen. If this 
code matches the one in the magazine carry on and type the next 
line, Note^ the code will not match if you use abbreviations. If you 
prefer to use abbreviations LIST the line you have just typed, move 
the cursor to that line and press RETURN, The code should now 
match. 

5, If the code does not match, use the editing keys to correct the line 
and press RETURN again. Repeat if necessary until the codes match. 

6, To check a line you have already typed LIST the line, place the 
cursor on that line and press RETURN, 

7. When you have finished a listing just SAVt or CSAVX it in the 
normal way. 

Vou can type in a program without using TYPO 3 and then check it by 
SAVEing m CSAVEing a copy of the program, running TYPO 3 and 
then LOADing or CI.OADing your program ami proceeding os in step 
6 above. 

Always SAVE or CSAVE a program before running it and always use 
TYPO before telling us that a program will not run. 



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1 ftEM WMMHMMMMHMMMMMMHKHHHMWWHMHMMMlfM 

2 REM * TYPO in by Alec Benson * 

* JUfie 1585 * 

3 REM * A proofreader for ANTIC and * 

* PAGE 6 based on TVPO II * 

* published by ANTIC wagazine * 

4 REM HWHMMMHKHMMMMMMMMMKMMW H MXSMMM H* 
100 GRAPHICS 8 

110 FOR 1 = 1536 TO 1731 2 READ A:CK=CK+A! 

POKE IjAfKEKF I 

120 IF CKO3076S THEN ? "Error in DATA 

Statements - Check Typing": END 
130 A = IJ5RCi53&3 

140 ? :? "TYPO III is UP and running"? 
MEN 

IB BO DATA 104, 169, 0, 185 j 25 . 3,201, b? 
1018 DATA 24 0,8,2 00,200,20 0,1*2, 36, 2 8© 
1020 DATA 242, 36, 2B0 , 165, 7% 153,2ft, 3 
1030 DATA 200,163,6,153,26,3,162,0 
1O40 DATA 189,0,228,157.75,6,232,224 
IBS© DATA 15,206,245,165,93,141,03,6 
1060 DATA 169,6, 141, 84, 6, 173, 4,228 
1878 DATA 105,0,141,35,6,173,5,220 
1OS0 DATA 105,0,141.36,6, 169, 0,162 
1O9 DATA 3, 149, 203, 202, 16, 25 JL, 56,0 
1100 DATA 8,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 
1110 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,32,94 
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1130 DATA 203, 133, 209, 138 P 72, 165, 0,133 
1140 DATA 200,152, ft, ±0, 36, 2GS, 6,209 
1150 OATA ±44,7, 24,101, 203, 144,2, £3G 
1±60 DATA 200,202,200,239,133,207,24,1 
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1190 DATA 20 6, 104, ±7 0>10 4, 4 0,96, 138, 72 

±200 DATA 152, 72,162,0, 134,207, 134, 20S 

1210 DATA ±60,24,6,204,33,205,38,206 

122 DATA 38,20 7,38, 208,56, 165, 26 7, 2 33 

1230 DATA 164, 178, 165, 208, 233,2,144,4 

1240 DATA 134,207,133,208,136,208,227, 

162 

1250 DATA 8, 165, 207, 133, 2B4, ±65, 238, 6 

1268 DATA 284,42, 201, 26, 144,4,233,26 

12/0 DATA 233,204,202,200,242,133,205, 

169 

±280 DATA 12S ,1 45, 88, 20O, 192, 40,2 06,24 

9 

1230 DATA 165, 204, ±05, ±60, ±60, 3,145,08 

1300 DATA ±65,205, 24, 105, 10±, 280 r ±45, 

3 

1310 DATA 32,69,6,104,168,76,153,6 



HhhI limr Shin I n i?« rn-t -Cowittc* I ^ ^* r** 

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INVERSE SPACE 



ft Page 6 - Issue 37 



\f\ TransdisklV \f\ 

^ Now Only £19.95! ,J 

Now's you r chance to upgrade your cassette garnes to disk with ihe most . 
powerful tape to disk utility for ihe Atari - and at a special summer rVter price! 

What makes Trar>sdi£k IV so powefHil? Its ihe ONLY laps- tP disk utility for the 
Atari thai nril> 

• Handle any type of cassette format 

• Handle cassettes that load e*lra levels (mum-load) 

• Remove protection from cassettes automatically 

• Transfer more than one game to one disk 

• Use all available memory on XL and XE computers 

• Handle cassettes that require ail 64k of memory 

• Support the Atari 1 050 disk drive density 

• Support modified double-density disk drives 

Requires: Atari 80OXL, 66XE or 1 30XE Compuier with disk drive and cassette 
recorder. 

Transdisk IV is supplied on disk and comes complete with step-by- step 
instruction bnoklsi. No other programs are required - (fie system is complete^ 
self-contained. 

Price: £1 9 95 fsavfl £5-00) inclusive of first dass delivery. 

Also available:- 

The Freezer! 

• Freezes tape or disk programs 

• Outputs copy of Irozen program lo a blank disk 

• Copy runs on any computer independent of Freezer 

Requires: Atari BOQrtL 65KE or 13GXE witfi disk drive. 

Price; El 4.95 inclusive of First class delivery. 

Transdisk rV and The freezer together £30.00 - save another £5.00 

To Order phone with credit card no. or make Cheque or P.O. payable 

ta Digicom Computer Services Ltd. and send to 

DIGICOM, 

Unit 36, Wharf side. Fenny Stratford, 
MILTON KEYNES MK2 2AZ Tel. 0908J80DB 



«^ivieUii|st 

ft 




ortuiare 



presents 

1. PAINTBOARD 

2. NETWORK & KING'S PERIL 

3. COUNTER-SLOT 

l- Paintboard has many powerful features which are supported by its 

30 commands, Commands include zoom, fill, colour, line, box, circle, 
airbrush, p*n, load, save, gallery etc. Supplied on TDK cassette with 
demo pictures and utility programs 

2, The Network & Kings Paril aire two separate puzzles which will k-eep 
yQ\j busy for hours' (A knowledge of chess useful with the King's 
Peril] 

3. Counter-Slot is a 'simple to understand hul difficult to solve' puzzle. 
It will probably drive you mad while trying to solve it. 

PAINTBOARD PACKAGE £6.99 

NETWORK & KINGS PERIL £1.99 
COUNTER -SLOT £4,99 

All programs run on any Atari, except ST, with at least 43k 

Prices induce postage and packaging 

Make cheques.'PCTs payable to Amethyst Software and send 

with your address to 

AMETHYST SOFTWARE 

3 Oban Avenue, De La Pole Avenue, Anlaby Road, 

Hull, North Humberside HU3 6SB 



CALLIST0 COMPUTER CLUB 

FOR ALL ATARI 800/XL/XE USERS 
SOFTWARE SALEI SOFTWARE SALE! 



Adwani9g«s of Joining \M Galllslo Club: 



ARCADE GAMES 

Ar.EC 

Sallblazer 

BatllHons 

Searmrkler 

Blue Majf 

rjehrnJar 

Gig Dug 

OrajDcnus 

OonKey Kong 

Donkey Kang Jn r 

Encounter 

Galaclit Cresla 

GaurHlel 

JOItft 

Lirie Devil 

MiiR r 2Q49er 

Mr RobM & Faclary 

Moon Patrol 

M« Pacrnan 

Pacman 

Pango 

Pitfall II 

QBart 

Rescue on FracEalus 
Space Graders 
Star FLpiiftrs U 
Tnundenox 

Zytiex-SQcarJ A::i: 

WAR 

Batlalwn CommaMer 

entile Cil sw (ssij 
Decr^ion m Desert 
Easier front 
Rna.1 Legacy 
Nato CofrinandBT 



Cass Dish Hnin 



4.5fl 



5-QQ 
7.» 



3.40 



7.» 



e.w 



9.9S 



11,00 

12.75 
"4.50 



6.75 3.50 



8.50 



4.75 
2.7D 



B.75 

12175 
6.75 



14.75 

14.75 
B.H 

1475 
975 

1275 

1275 
12.75 



12.75 
9.75 

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1275 
12.75 
12.75 

9.75 

7.75 
14.75 

9J5 
14.75 



7.99 



21.0ft 



8L7TG 1273 



1275 



PRODUCTIVITY 

Ala* Writer 
A:.r VrlF' Plus 
B Grajh 
Mm Office II 
Prinlshap 
loucntvping 
Vsiralc 

MUSIC 

DigiflrusnS 
Music C&mpassr 
Player Piano 

SPORTS 

itiO Darts 
Eupg Soccer 
I igl'l N. Bus iu 
Foolball Manager 
J&Cky W. Darls 
Lea&erD&arrj 
Ninja 

Pole Position 
■SpBfld Ace 
Speed Run Rally 
Uftnler Olympiad 

ADVENTURES 
Eternal Oagaer 
Griuiriu Ranrjsr 
Guild ©1 Thieves 
Knight Ore 
Hitchlke* GG 
IngTkTs Back 
Jtnxlfrf 
LancEiat 
Lurklna Horror 
Monden's Quest 
3 IkiDii Drcains 
The Hulk 
Ultima III or IV 





29.D0 




2S.ro 




16.95 




21 .DA 


4.7* 




■■ 


39.W 


4.9ft 


4.95 


4JS 


4.25 


2.W 




ft.5Q 


12.75 


2.« 


... 


270 




2.9Q 


1275 


2.30 






12.75 


270 




a go 


3.50 


a.so 


12.75 


a.75 


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a.75 


8.75 




16.95 


12.75 


12.75 




£1.00 




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1G.95 


12.75 


12.75 




21.00 


5.90 




12.» 


12.75 


2.7D 





2* 0: 



* Software at discuunl prices 

* EJCEllttlYfl SultwarB unit available la mB-mbfirs 
" Public domain library 

* RBflLlar neiwslstier anil special Btlsr \t\lm malion 

FREE MEMBERSHIP - mftfflbftrSllip is FREE whan you purchase any 
ul itiB Butiware listed lalow - and, unlike suitis surtwara tlulw., 
Ihs-rfl is no abligalion Id buy fuflfiET SDltwara. 



i*.ra 



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12.75 



FLIGHT SIMULATION 

Ace qF Acas 
FllQM Sim II 
Fl5 Sflrike Eagle 
Fighter Pikil 
5dIp Hiflht 
SpiPireftc^i 



CASINO 

Frurtman 

Las Vfloas Caainn 

Seven Said Slud 

STRATEGY 
Archwi 
Colossus. Chess 

LANG J AGES 

fc-sembltf Editor 
Basic *E 
BcL Fig Forth 
L«fl 
Turbo Bajsic 

ART 

Dtisigmr's Psncil 
Micros or 



2.90 



E.75 
B.75 
B.75 
B.75 


33.95 
12.B5 
12.75 
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- 


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2 


675 
9.50 



16.95 



1275 



PNCtS Intljdfl prjstags and paefcauirq |q UK - CwrwtS add £1 
Exlfllrq fflflmbart Hlea» quuls rn&mb&refiip iunt>sr 



COMPILATIONS 

4 Star 1- Escape Doumworld, Pajiic fanner : CaiS 3-541 

4 Star 2 - Dieadnaught. Space Wars, Scream ing Wings, CrumiilEs Crisis : Cass 3.50 

Quartet Sold: Soara Wars, Oread nought. Little fteril. Laser Hawk : Ca&i a.so 

Poblir Domain: Sample eomr)*lat»ofl ol 6 u^ihes a.nd ni lien ihr .ides 5Dp '/oucheri 1.35 Cass 2.95 



16 95 



Disk 



Cheques; aid Postal orders payable to: 

CALLIST0 COMPUTERS, DEPT AU2. Gwelfrjr, NcbQ, Amlwch, 

Gwynedd, LL68 9NE Tel (0407) 830704 



Page 6 - lane 37 







write to 

Mailbag 

P.O. Box 

54, 

Stafford 
ST16 1DR 

ENGLAND 



AILING CASSETTE 

I heave on Atari 800XL and a 
tape recorder which will take 
most games except Americana 
which make some very good 
games. I think the problem is 
my tape recorder because my 
friend has the same computer 
and when 1 plug his recorder 
into my computer all the games 
work. I have been everywhere 
looking for someone to fix it and 
have not been successful yet in 
finding a person who will mend 
my Atari. Please would you let 
me know of uny places that 
would tuke an interest in my 
computer. 

Leigh Rmyford, 
Stoke on Trent 

Atari used to operate a number of 
Service Centres around the country 
through small retailers hut litest 
now seem to hove died and the 
multiple stores are not going to be 
interested in people's little prob- 
lems, One company that was 
always good with reryairs is AS. 
Wootton and Son who are in the 
Resource File at the hack, of the 
magazine and another company 
that will repair Atari's is FM 
Engineering, Unit 260, Milton Sci- 
ence Park, Cambridge (phone 0223 
4200071 although we are not sure 
if they do cassettes. It sounds as if 
your cassette's heads may he out of 
alignment, a common problem and 
relatively easy to fix r but da check 



the cost of repairs before sending 
any equipment off as repots can 
sometimes cost almost as roucfi m 
a new machine! If any readers 
know of a good reliable company 
that will repot Atari S-hit equip- 
meni please let us know and we 
witt include it in our Resource File. 



PROGRAMMING 
CHALLENGES 

I am a devoted Alarian as you 
are but there are a few things 
that [ have to ask you. 
Mow that Atari User has been 
stopped *'ill there be any more 
shows? Also could we have some 
challenges for the few good 
programmers such as I, What I 
mean is, Page 6 could think up 
on idea and we readers haw to 
write a program for that idea, 
you could then offer a prize for 
the best sent in. In Atari User 
there was a pruyram to produce 
3-D images coiled 3-D DRAWER. 
I was really impressed by it and 
it gave me the idea of drawing 
something on the screen and 
then changing its position, e.g. 
turning it around. As I am 
absolutely pathetic at machine 
a>de r 1 thought you could find a 
good programmer to do this. It 
wouid be of great interest to a 
number of people, Vou could 
draw a shape and turn that 
shape into a player, add a few 
machine code routines and get it 
moving? On the subject of 



machine code could you recom- 
mend a book for the complete 
beginner as I am very willing to 
team how to program faster. 
Could you also give my praise 
and amazement to your prog- 
rammer Paul Lay, What will he 
think up nexi' ? 

K- Hill, 
Coventry 

Thanks for the suggestions. A 

programming competition would be 
nice hut from past experience we 
haw found that it just doesn r t 
work. What seems to happen is 
thai everyone thinks thai their 
efforts will not be a* good as 
everyotie rises, so nobody sends 
anything in! Some of our col- 
umnists have fried simple program- 
ming challenges with the same 
result set it is unlikely that we will 
be doing this in the neur future - 
unless hundreds of you demand it! 
The idea of drawing a 3-D image 
and viewing it From different angles 
has already been done in Page 6 
bock in Issue 26 with Solid Morf\-\l- 
mg r you could even animate the 
image, but turning images into 
players is more difficult than might 
seem. The main problem is that a 
player is limited in $ixe r although 
you could combine sewral players 
together, Ihere an? a few public 
domain Player Missile designers 
around which might help but you 
still need to add your own code to 
animate them. 
A tpod txx>k tor machine code? 






BEGINNER'S PROBLEMS 



I bought an Atari 65XE for my 
son at Christmas without realis- 
ing the potential of such a 
machine. Since then I have 
become totally addicted, not just 
to software games like my son, 
but to programming aspects and 
especially the type-in listings. As 
o complete novice I do not 
purport to know anything at all 
about programming so could 
you please explain what is 
wrong with certain listings? I 
decided to have a crack at 
(umble Cell from Issue 35 as my 
debut but when I ran it all I got 
was ERROR 8 at line 480. Im- 
agine my dismay, 1 was totally 
confused as I had used I VPO 111 
and double checked and checked 
again, I also typed in Music Box 
from Issue 36 but as I ran it it 



gave ERROR over and over 
again in line 2002. 
I would like to add that 
although I have had these prob- 
lems, they are the only pmbkems 
I have encountered with your 
listings. 

Inverness 

We like to hear of anyone who gets 
addicted to the Atari and we like to 
help us much as possible with 
difficulties in typing in the listings, 
which is just why TYPO 3 was 
developed. Now are you absolutely 
sure that you are using TYPO 
correctly and not letting one or two 
non-matching codes go by? There 
is no reason why you should get an 
error in fumble Cell and no possible 



way that TYPO could give you a 
matching code if the line was 
wrong. Error S foxes all beginners 
because the error is nal in the line 
that the computer says it is, but in 
data that that line is trying lo read. 
In the example af fumble Cell, 
although your error is strictly in 
line 430 because the computer 
fails at the RTAQ B statement, the 
actual typing error will be some- 
where in lines 500 to SSQ, One 
way to find exactly where it is when 
DATA is being read by a loop is lo 
find out how far through the loop 
the* program has gone when it 
encounters the error. Take a look at 
line 480 and you will see a FOR .. 
NEXT loop which counts from 1 to 
32 and reads the DATA in be- 
tween. When you run the program 
and it stops with the envr r type 



10 Page 6 - Issue 37 



Unfortunately all the best hooks are 
now out of print and the only ants 
that are easily available ore Com- 
puters Machine Language For Be- 
ginners and Second Book or 
Machine language, both available 
through the Page 6 Accessory Sfiop. 
Finally, yes there mil be more Atari 
User shows organised by Database, 
details are on the news page this 
issue. 



ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS 

I hove just started doing an 
electrical course to aid me in my 
job, Obviously the course invol- 
ve? drawing circuit diagrams, 1 
can recall seeing a program 
some time back that enabled 
you to draw electrical circuit 
diagrams. Da you know of such 
a program cmd if 50 where [ 
could yet hold of one? 

John Fallon 
Birmingham 

If you have an XUXE the program 
you are probably thinking about is 
PAGE MARSHAL whitft has been 
coming soon' for about eighteen 
months but is now finally available 
from the publishers Volar Software 
and, by coincidence, is advertised 
for the first time in this very issue. 
The printouts and facilities look 
excellent for an 8 bit machine. On 
the ST there is PCB Designer from 
Abacus software which is distri- 
buted by Precision Software and is 



available from decision direct or 
from the many software discounters 
who don't advertise in Page 6! 



NOT SO GOOD 

] own an Atari B-bit computer 

and I have been a great fan of 
Atari User for many years. I 
have just received the new Page 
6 Atari User and I am afraid to 
say that it isn't as good as the 
original Atari User. 
At first glance your new maga- 
zine seems to be a bit too 
serlOUS. Most 8-bit users one 
children who ore looking to their 
Atari for fun, your magazine is 
just like the newspapers, for 
example the Daily Telegraph. 
Atari User used to be a fun and 
enjoyable magazine, I suppose 
that is the main reason why it 
was so popular. Another few 
things that are missing are a 
TOP 20 chart, software solutions, 
hints and tips on games, what 
games are soon to be released 
grid what games are released 
overseas. I know this is a tall 
order for you to undertake but 
as you only give Atari 8-bit users 
40 pages then I do not think it 
would break the bank if you 
give us about 20 or 30 pages 
extra. Then Atari S-bit users 
would get the coverage we de- 
serve. I would also like to com- 
plain that most of the pages in 
the Atari 8-bit section are used 
up with type-in listings, hardly 



PRINT L (L is the variable used for 
the loop) ond a number will be 
printed on the screen, This number 

will represent the data item that is 
causing the problem, for example if 
it were 1 6 the wrong data state- 
ment would be the 16th number 
counting from line 500 up to line 
550. You wilt probably find that 
you have typed a character instead 
of a number or maybe put a 
comma at tfie end of the tine and 
if you did then you didn't use TYPO 
properly did you? 
The Musk Box problem is slightly 
different but again should be 
picked up by TYPO, The line is too 
long to be typed in as it stands and 
you have probably fast the end 
part. Although the computer can 
show four fines of a program on 
screen you can only type in three 



lines, if you see any program line in 
a listing that goes otito a fourth 
line then you must find a way to 
squeeze that onto three Unes. This 
can be done in several ways. You 
can type POKE 82,0 ino line 
number) and press Return before 
typing in the line, you can use 
abbreviations for the command 
words, such as GR r for GRAPHICS 
and SO. for SOUND and finally you 
can actually leave out nearly all the 
spaces! The computer wilt sort il all 
out for you. Most of these subjects 
have been covered in past issues of 
Page 6 but the issues are now, 
mostly, out of print. As many of the 
good books are now also out of 
pnni maybe it's time to resurrect 
some of the arficJes if there are now 
a number of new owners sampling 
the delights of pmgramming? 



anyone has time to type them 
tn, so please not too many. 

Austin Collins 

You have probably upset 80% of 
Atari owners by referring to them 
as children! Readers of Page 6 
range from youngsters up to folks 
in their sixties and seventies with 
the majority in between. These 
people take their Atari seriously 
whidi is why the magazine is more 
serious. Fun with your Atari is waht 
you make il r not necessarily just big 
splashes of colour and cartoon 
drawings. New games? We report 
what we can find out, but most 
publishers in the 8-bit field are 
hopeless at telling anyone wltat is 
happening and as for overseas, it is 
probably easier to get White Mouse 
defence papers than it is to get an 
answer from an American sofhvare 
publisher: We have tried. People do 
type in the listings, even the iang 
ones, its how a lot of people ieam 
to program. As for an extra 20 or 
30 pages not breaking the batik, 
tell that to our bank manager. Do 
you know how much these things 
cost? At a rough guess you could 
buy yourself about 9 f 000 budget 
cassettes over the next year for 
what it would cost to put an extra 
30 pages in every issue- 



GET IT WRONG! 

J have just received Page 6 Atari 
User and started to read it with 
some trepidation as this was the 

dawn of a new era for the 8-bit 
Atari user in this country. I write 
as q great fan of the original 

Atari User, which was a superb 
magazine^ 

You ask for comments und 
within ten minutes of reading 
the magazine [ have to write to 
you with a plea. Will Page 6 
adopt the excellent Get It Right 
routine used extensively in Atari 
User for their new standard of 
error-checking Basic programs? 
The routine can either be typed 
in, or i5 available on the Atari 
User foolkit disk. Ihe rmson for 
asking you to adopt this system 
is simple; TYPO III is outdated. I 
believe that all dedicated Page 6 
enthusiasts would marvel at the 
speed and ease of use of Ihe GIR 
program. Please take my critic- 



ism seriously. I c;an assure you 
that I am writing on behalf of 
every dedicated Atari User who 
regularly typed in programs 
from the oJd magazine. 
Finally , a question - is my 
XF551 double sided (os I be- 
lieved was mentioned when ] 
bought it) and if so, can Sparta- 
Dos 3,2 use this facility? At the 
moment I am using DOS 2.5 as 
supplied and getting annoyed at 
the slow speeds the drive oper- 
ates at. 

Tris Love 
Glastonbury 

A new dawn? We had our dawn 

long ago, before Atari User was 
even thought of, and don't plan on 
a sunset for a long, long, time, 1 
supposed that utilities are subjective 
things but I can't honestly see haw 
Get It Right is better than 1 YPQ. 
With TYPO you hit RF.TUPN and 
know, there and then, whether the 
line is right - NOTHING can be 
faster than that r can it? Surely it is 
easier to have lite emir cade right 
on the line you are iyj?ing than 
have to refer to crriiart that might 
be two pages away? The short 
answer is that TYPO III lives on, we 
have had dozens of letters and 
phone culls from Atari User readers 
saying it is brilliant, so 1 guess that 
it depends on your point of view. 
The XF551 is double sided, it is 
just that it needs the proper DOS 
which Atari have still not released. 
SpartaDos wilt support true double 
density, if you can afford if get the 
new SpartaDos X reviewed in this 
issue. 



SOME LIKE IT! 

Congratulations on your take 
over of Atari User the new 
magazine is yreot. Being a prog- 
rammer for my father's firm 
requires me to gather as much 
information about both compu- 
ters as I can. With Page 6 Atari 
User I have the best of both 
worlds, only one 8 bit magazine 
to buy with a 16 bit section in 
the price but 45p cheaper than 
ST USER! Brilliant. Keep up the 
good work. 

Tyron Bennett 
Can vey Island 



More letters overleaf 



P*9* 6 - l»uc 37 ll 



COME DANCING! 

Thinking of the superb graphics 
of the Atari gave me an idea for 
a most unusual program and I 
think it would be a doddle for 
one of your contributors. 

In recent years IVe noticed a 
great revival among younger 
people in the art of ballroom 
dancing, yes ballroom dancing. 
After oil, prancing Mfce frogs in a 
circle around a pile of handbags 
isn't dancing, it's boring. So how 
about a program showing the 
basic steps in the form of foot- 
prints moving around the 
screen, both sets Of prints of 
course, ladies and gents. Dia- 
grams in books and their accom- 
panied Instructions are frequent- 
ly unclear and the timing of the 
steps is not easily understood. 

Who knows, maybe the staff of 
Page 6 would be motivated to 
start a dance club! 

E.G. Mite ham, 
West Midland* 

Now there's a mast unusual appti* 

cation. I suspect thai all the wizard 
Atari programmers would find the 
machine code no problem hut 
would blow iheir brains trying to 
figure qui the steps! Might be a 
problem getting in the sound 
effects though, a sampled s Oueh f 
takes up a lot of memory! Maybe 
someone wants to try this out I'd 
rather do the more modem stuff, 
just two footprints and a whole 
bunch of RND cammun&tf As to 
the dance club, our youngest mem- 
ber of staff, Stacey, to falling about 
on the floor laughing al ihe 
moment. Pull yourself together, girt, 
this man is serious! 



GAMES CENTRES WITH NO GAMES 



Whilst reading your last issue 
1 noticed the double page ad- 
vertisement for Atari Games 
Centres. I was delighted to find 
that there was a centre close to 
me « I went down to Toy and 
Hobby in Manchester and 
found to my amazement that 
they had only three games far 
the Atari but a larger selection 
for other computers. They had 
no hardware at all. I'm won- 
dering how on earth it got to 
be an official games centre 
with just three games as even 
my local video shop conies 
more Atari software. 

K. t airhurst 
Manchester 

I am writing to see if Page 6 
can enlighten me on an item 
which left me shot down in 
flames! 1 saw the advertise- 
ment in December's issue far 
the new Games Centres and 
saw Capital Computers so off I 
went on a 10 mile bus journey 
and what did 1 find? Four 
Atari 8 bit tides, so I asked the 
attendant what was going on. 
He said that Atari had sup- 
plied the centre but then recal- 
led it because Atari & bit 
games are to cease from Febru- 
ary. 1 was shocked, stunned 
and not amused at all! After a 
visit to Silicon Centre who I 
though supported Atari but 
only had 12 titles, I was about 
to give up when T saw a lad 
with an Atari tape. I asked 
him where he got Lt and he 
pointed me in the direction of 



Virgin's Megastore. To my sur- 
prise they had 22 titles so 1 
went home happy but still- 
shocked at this state of affairs. 

Spike, 

Temple Gorebridge 

I arm writing to say how 
misleading the new 'Official 
atari Games Centres' ads are. 
The advertisement clearly 
shows a stand with a very 
amount of XE software on it 
and states that there are hun- 
dreds of titles in store at these 
centres for bath XF. and VCS. I 
thought great, loadsa titles for 
both my machines. 1 already 
have ATARI WORLD to go to 
in my area plus four other 8 
bit/VCS stockists but I rang up 
Toy and Hobby in Manchester 
and to my disappointment 
they had only six VCS titles 
and no XE titles in stock! My 
disappointment turned to dis- 
may when I rang their Stock- 
port branch to be told that 
they had NO XE titles and only 
©ME VCS game! 1 am amazed 
at how ATARI WORLD is not 
listed and these shops are. 

Damon Shaw, 
Salford 

We can't really comment except 
to say how sad the situation Is, 
Atari tell us that they are 
extending the Comes Centres 
and producing more 8 bit soft- 
ware (see news pages) but It 
does seem a shambles. Mow 
about clearing this up Atari? 



SORRY, BUT WE 
CANT HELP 

I have been having difficulties 
with a program published in 
ATARI USER bade in February 
1988 entitled Customising The 
Default Screen by Ken Erearly. I 
can get the program to make an 
auto-boot cassette but when this 
cassette has loaded the computer 
just Jocks up. I have checked the 
listing with the new Get It Right 
but I cannot for the life of me 
find anything wrong with the 
program. Please can you et me 
know what is wrong? 

Simon Itowyer 
Winchester 

This is just representative of dozens 
of letter we have received about 
problems with listings from Atari 
User but I'm afraid that, much as 
we would like to help, we just am'L 
All of the listings from Atari User 
are just as new to us as they are to 
those of you who have typed them 
in. We "weren't involved in evaluat- 
ing them and hove not seen a 
working version of most of them, so 
how cun we answer your queries, 
short of typing in every listing 
ourselves? We would really like to 
help but it just ain't possible r 
Maybe there are one or two 
readers who have got Atari User 
programs running who would be 
willing to help others out? If 
someone wants to volunteer lo run 
a sort ofAlari User listing helpline, 
we will gladly publish details but 
we simply do not have the time to 
help out. Apologies to alt those who 
think that we don't care, we do, 
but we just don't have the resour- 
ces to and help with every query. 



GENEALOGY ON THE ATARI 



JJte tetter from Paul Thomas last 
issue sparked off a good response. 
E r G. Richards from London sugges- 
ted several programs for the ST - 
GENERATION GAP published by 
flying Pigs Software, PC, Box 685, 
St. George, UT 84770, USA cost 
awund $39.95 - ROQTS II whkh is 
for the IBM butwill run m the ST 
using PC Dim, cost S195, pub- 
lisher not known - NEWGEN writ- 
ten by Mr Richards himself priced 
at £15. If you send a w to him 
at 2 Pecbarmans Wood, London, 
SE 26 6RX he will send you full 



details - COMPUTE YOUR ROOTS 
written by ferry Hotis, Wasatch 
Genealogical Software, 2899 West 
75SQ South, West Jordan, Utah 
84084, USA, price $29.95. 
Mr Richards also suggests wntmg 
to the Society of Genealogists, 14 
Charterhouse Buildings, GosweH 
Road,Londm EC1M 7BA wftkn has 
a special interest group holding 
regular meetings to discuss geneal- 
ogy and computers. It also pub- 
lishes a magazine called 'Gmpu- 
ters in Genealogy'. The Birming- 
ham and Midland Genealogy and 



Heraldry Society are also said to 
have a computer branch, Finally 
there is a book 'Computers for 
Family HistoryrAn Introduction' 
by David Howgood published in 
1985 by Howgood Computing 
Ltd., 26 Cloister Rood, Acton, 
London W3 ODE 
Mr G. Mance of Essex also wrote 
as he was the chap mentioned in 
our reply who bought the Flying 
Pigs Software. He advises that the 
software and after sales support 
from flying Pigs is excellent don't 
be put off by the name! He paid 



$42 by Access (using a cmffr card 
Is by far the best way to oet soft- 
ware from overseas). He also re- 
commends FAMILY TREE maga- 
zine available from W,H. Smith or 
direct from the publishers at I 41, 
Great Whyte, Ramsey, Hunting- 
don, Cambridgeshire, PE17 1HP 
as well as the book mentioned 
afore 

Thanks also to all the other read- 
ers who wrote in with advice and 
suggestions. There is on a/tkk on 
Genealogy wfte the 8 bit Atari in 
Issue 30. 



12 Page £ - Issue 37 






BLASTCOM is fust what the name implies a good old fashioned blast as wave upon 
wave of aliens come swooping down on u vertically scrolling screen. There is no 
storyline (unless you want to make up your own) just fast, colourful, 100% 
machine code arcade action. Keep shooting and avoiding contact with the aliens 
until your luck and your lives run out. You have four lives to start off with and 
play until you have no more. If you are good enough you can get your name onto 
the high score table, Get typing and get blasting! Plug a joystick into port 1 and 
fire away. 

The program was written with a MAC65 Assembler and was turned from machine 
code to data statements using BOFFO from ANALOG magazine's November 1984 
issue. The loader routine is also adapted from a program originally published by 
ANALOG. 

Karl Fenwick 



by 







TYPING IT IN 




Simply type in the BASIC listing, using TYPO 3 to check the lines as you go, and 
then save the finished program to disk or cassette using CSAVE for cassette or 
SAVE "D: BLASTCOM" for disk, LOAD the program back in again and type RUN. 
Although the program is totally Assembly language it does not create a 
bootable file, the loader simply reads the DATA and POKEs it into memory. As 
the program is just over 2K in length there should be no problem running it on 
any Atari XL or XE or the older machines. 




LISTING OVERLEAF 



GETTING THE SOURCE CODE 

The author is wilting to make copies of the Assembly Language source cade for BLASTCQM available to any 
interested readers for a small payment ; Send £2 for a tape copy ar £.1 far a disk copy ta SARDAKER 
SOFTWARE, 3& Sham Hal! Crescent Flixton, Manchester, M31 SEN. Make all cheques payable to 
SARDAKtR SOFTWARE and please specify if you want MAC65 or Atari Assembler Editor versions. 



+ 



Page 6 - Issue 37 13 



BLASTCOM 



MO I REH **" 



t**-K 



BlflSIUUH 
tnr ATARI HL^HE 

fry 

Karl F?iiwick 



* 



tay 2 rem * 

HP 3 REM It 

XT -4 AEH * 

Jft 5 REM * 

55 6 «EM # r ' * 

KD 7 REH * PA« 6 MAGAZINE - f-HGLAMD * 

HU fl REH HMMI iM rKM M Ml l Mi i W HIti t WIi MmCKM W l i HH i t w M 

MO 9 REM 

TV 218 IffftP 350! ADDR1::24576:ADPR2 = 24576 

HT 248 ? "flPleas* wait 8 f»w noiwnts *#hil 

P HLAST-COH loads" 

ZG 258 FUR LIHE=ZBt TO 1188 STEP 16 
afl ZftH FOR h^i TO 23 
ML 278 READ BYTE : POKE ADDNZ , BYTE 2 fl D DR? "A 

DR2 + 1 
KA 280 T6TAL~T0TAL*8VTE 

OZ 298 IF T*TAL>999 THEit TOTAL=TOTAL-1B88 
LH 386 HEKT X 
ik 310 READ CHECKSUM 
DB 328 TF TOT AL < > C HECK5UM THEN T "DATA ER 

ROR AT LINE * p ; LINE: END 
EH 3X0 MCHT LINE 
HT 348 A^USRCA&DRU 
DY 368 IF PEEKC195J=6 THEN ? "OATA OK' 1 : EM 

D 
SB 768 ? "DATA ERROR "*> PEEK €1951 9CN0 
Yfl 376 REM M MMW IIMil HHU l l WWIl M 
FM 3 88 REM START OF M/C * 
OS 398 REH DATA * 

VD 488 HEM W KHKHWtt HHM KHftHK 

GK 41B DATA 16^^.141,51,182,32^9^^^, 
184,96, 3 2 , &4, *7 , 32 , 118,97,76, 5, 96, 163, 
*,141 f 17i f 182, 127 
ZH 4 20 DATA 141,174,1*2,141,61,182,141,62 
, 162 , 173, 53. 1*2 ,280, 91, 16 J, 4* 141 , 53, 18 
2,169, 8,141,63, 182,162,566 
CfC 430 DATA 8,169,113,162,157,121,1*2,169 
j 117,102. 157, 125, 182, 2 3 7, ?£4 , 4 ,288, 239 
, 168,6,16?, 2,153,221,183,177 
HW 440 DATA 288.288,192,8,288,247,162,8,1 
6 9,166,183,221,2*2,163, 248,4, 144,20, 17 
6, 5,232,224,4,268, 239*814 
TU 4SC DAffl 162,*, 189, 186, 103, 157, 282, 183 
, Z32, 224, 5,288,245, 169 , It, 141, 1*6, IBS, 
141,107,103, 141,108,183,141,129 
CI 468 DATA 1*9, 183, 141, 110, 183, 109, 6 , L41 
,196,2,169,12,141,197,2,169,0,141,196, 
2,169,8,141,280,2,752 
KA 476 DATA 109, 14,141, 199,2, 169,3, 141 ,15 
p 2 10, 109, 65, 141, 6, 216, 169, 2, 141, X- * 218, 
109,128,141,8,210,579 
UN 400 DATA 169,184,141,244,2,141,9,212,9 
6,169,104,141,7,212,169,62,141,47,2,14 
1,8, 2 12, 169, 28 ,141, 434 
9B 498 DATA 111,2,141,27,288,169,3,141,29 
,288, 169, 0,141,1 2, 288, 169, 224, 141, 145, 
182,169, 8,162, 8, 109,284 
HT 580 DATA 2 , 157 . 6 , 288 , I H9, 64 p 162, 157 f 19 
2,2,189,66,1*2,157,133,1*2,157,8,288,1 
8*, 72,1*2,157,137,18 2,248 
OC 518 OATA 1*9,76,182,157,141,1*2,157,4, 
206, 232, 224, 4. 288, 216, 162. *, 169, 8. 157, 
8, 187, 157, 8, 18ft, 15 7, 2 77 
MK 528 DATA 8 , 189 , 15 ? , *, 118 ,157 , 8, 111 , 262 
,266,238,162,8,168,0, 189,8,104,153, 132 
. 168, 15 3,132,189, 153,132 
US 53* DATA 132 , 11 8 , 153 , 132 , 11 1 , 189, 16 , IB 
4,153,224,107,208,280,200,232,224,0,2* 
8, 2 27,96,169,191,141,2,163,764 
KT 548 DATA 169,183,141,3,1*3,169,8,141,4 
8, 2,141, 2,212,169,1*3,141,49,2,141,3, 2 
12,169, 225 , 141 , 0, 353 
YH 55* DATA 2,169,100,141,1,2,169,128,13, 
14, 2 12,141,14, 2 12, 16 2, 98.160,43, 169, 6, 
32, 92, ZZB, 96, 173, 930 
LG 560 DATA 174,1*3,281,68,144,249,162,97 
, 168 , 195 , 16 9 , 6 , 32 , 92 , 2ZB , 169 , * , 141 ,1,2 
18, 141,3, 218, 141, 5, 22 
HJ 57* DATA 218 , 141 , 7, 210 , 286 , 53 , 1BZ, 173 , 
53,1*2,24*, 28 ,18,166, 169,8, 153,221, 1*3 
, 169,225,141,2,1*3, 169,17 2 



JO 58© DATA 1*1,141.3,183,76,186,97,169,1 
51,141,2,103,1-69,183,141,3,183,173,16, 
206 , 286 , 251,141 w 3* , 280 P 199 
KM 596 OATA 96, 162, 0, 13B , 157 , B , 206, 232 , 2 2 
4, 4, Z86, 2 48, 169, 8.133, 77, 230, 57, 182, 20 
8,65,238,58,182, 173,4 96 
LH 688 DATA 58,102,281,1,206,55,169,8,141 
,57,182,141,58,1*2, 169,255,77,54,182,1 
41,54, 182,248,25, 173,283 
HI 618 DATA 2,183,141,55,182,173,3,183,14 
1, 56 ,1*2, 16 9, 9, 141, 2, 1*1, 169, 102, 141, J 
, 1B3 , 76, 24, 98 , 173 , 577 
IK 626 DATA 55 , 182 , 141 P 2 , 183 , 173 , 56 , 182 , 1 
41, 3,1*1, 169, 225, 141, 0,2, 169,180, 141,1 
,2,32,1*1,188, 141,972 
PF 636 OATA 3*, 288, 76, 95, 228, 238, 61, 182, 2 
06,45,2 38,62, 1*2,17 3,62, 1*2,2*1,2,2*8, 
35,169,0,141,61,182,921 
UN 648 DATA 141,62,102,174,63,102,109,121 
,1*2,40,6,254,121,1*2,76,63,98,222,121 
, 182 , 232 , 224 , 4 , 288, 2 , 88* 
16 558 DATA 162, B, 142,63, 102, 169, 225,141, 
8, 2, 189, 1**, 141, 1,2, 169,8, 133,77,173,1 
46,1*2,141,5,288,453 
NB 66* DATA 173,147,182,141,6,288,32,191, 
188, 173, 174, 182, 248,3,76, 20,188, 173, 6, 
200,240.3,76,2*9,99,457 
DU 67* DATA 173,11,286,248,3,76,289,99,17 
3,9,288,248,6,32,1-40,181,76,165,98,173 
,14,288, 248, 3,32, 390 
■H 688 OATA 14* , 181 , 173 , 189 , 162 , 24* , 14, 1* 
1,2, 216, 169, 39, 141, 3 ,218, 2X8, 189, 182, 7 
6,189,98,169,8,141,3,469 
ML 698 DATA 210,32,151,188,173,171,182,24 
8, 2*, 32, 12 1,181, 169, 234, 141, 5, 218, 173, 
198, 102, 141,4, 218. 238, 19*, 971 
FA 700 DATA 102,76,235,96,169,0,141,5,218 
, 173, 16, 208, 288 , 6, 169, 18,141, 198, 102, 3 
2,78,101,173,8,211,827 
VM 71* DATA 41, 15 ,201, 15, 249, 17, IB, 17*, IB 
9,01,102,141,3,99,189,8 2,182,141,4,99, 
32,2,99,169,1,71 
TZ 728 OATA 141,184,1*2,162,8,142,80,182, 
174,88,182,173,184,182,45,9,206,248,17 
,169,1,157,185,102,141,73 
BP 738 DATA 189,102,32,263,181,76,152,99, 
76,65.99. 173,184,182, 4 5,18,266,24*, 14, 
169,1,141,189,102,157,2 
XD 74B DATA 185,102,32,2*3,101,76,152,99, 
24,189,121,162, 248,58,125,133,102,201, 
51,248,18,176,16,72,169,1 
X5 75B DATA 121 , 1*2, 73,255, 1B7, 121, 162, 25 
4,121,182,1*4,76.113,99,281,2*8,144,13 
,72,189,121,182,7 3,255,157,320 
ZA 768 OATA 121,102,254,121,102,104,157,1 
33, 102, 169 y 8, 157, 8, 288, 189, 137, 18Z, 141 
,151,182,169,125,182,248,55,591 
FA 778 OATA 24,125,117,102,201,245,176,12 
,157,13 7,182,141,158,102,32,09, 188,76, 
IS 7, 99, 173, 10 ,21*, 74, 24, 476 
CI 78* DATA 165,51, 174,6*, 182 ,157, 133, 102 
,169,8,157,0,208,189,137,182,141,151,1 
BZ, 169, *, 157, 137, 182, 141,442 
RP 790 DATA 150,182,32,89,188,14,184,182, 
238,80,102, 173,88, 182,201,4,240,3,78, 1 
5,99,141,38,268,76,83 
DF 888 DATA 95,226,162,8,138,157,8,288,23 
2,224,4,200,248,169,1,141,174,162,141, 
38,208,169,0,141,57,32* 
PZ 818 OATA 182,141,56,162,141,54,182,169 
,1,141,8,218,169,0.141,5,218,141,7,210 
,169,47,141,1,218,8 
AV 628 OATA 169,47,141,3,218,169,8,141,8, 
218, 141, 59, 162, 141, 2, 210, 141, 68, 182,23 
8 , 174 , 1*2 , 162 -, 8 , 189 , 913 
K£ 83* OATA 141,102,24,125,129,102,281,20 
,144,7,201,235,176,3,157,141,102,169,8 
,157,0,288,232,224,4,917 
MF 840 DATA 288,228,24,173,59,162,185,2,1 
41, 8, 218, 141, 59, 182, 238, 59, 182, 173, 59, 
182,141,2,218,173,141,871 
tO 85* DATA 1*2,141,4,2*8,173,144,182,141 



14 Fugc 6 - Issue 37 



BLASTCOM 



,7,200,76,95,226, IV 4 , 68 , 192 , 183 , 15 3 , 1© 

2, 133, 206,167, ff ,133,209,146 
HO 668 pot A 170,172,151,102,145,296,200,2 

80,288,2 32,224,8,298, 2 4 6,172, I £9,182,1 

62,9, 169,8, 104, 145 H 295,20*, 4 6 
HI! 876 DATA 298 , 299, 232 , 224, 8, 206* Z43 , 96 , 

173,144,192,261,52, 144, 43 j 16?, 254,133, 

207,76,162,160,173,141*102,639 
QU 009 DATA 201,202,176,35,169,2,133,207, 

76, 162, 10 9,162,9,189, 141,192, 24, 101,29 

7,157,141,192,232, 224,4,88 
UK 90 DATA 298,242,173,141,102,141,4,208 

r 17** 144,102, 144 ,7,209 j 96,173,39,194,7 

2 P 173,31,164,72,102,0,114 
KG 999 DATA 199, 24 , 104, 107,13, 184, 109, 32, 

104,107,33, 194,202, 16,241,104,141,24, 1 

94, 194, 141,32, 18 4,96,7 2, 717 
LU 919 DATA 130,72,162,9,109,157,192,141, 

19, 21?, 9 ,192, 141, 22, 200 ,232, 224, 16, 296 

,249, 169, 17, 141, 27,290, 954 
VK 929 DOT A 169,134*141,16,212,141,22,290 

,169*132,141,23,298,109,130,141,18,212 

,141, 24,298, 173 J 133,192,141,248 
VP 930 OATA 9,288,173,134,102,141,1,298,1 

73, 135,192, 141,2, 26 B, 173, 136, 192, 141, 3 

,28 8,169,54,141,8,2, 185 
HK 449 DAT ft 169,191,141,1,2,104,170,104,6 

4, 7 2,141, 18,212, 141, IB, 212, 141,16, 212, 

173, 142 P 192, 141, 5, 200, 993 
IIJ 950 9ATA 173, 143,182, 141,6, 206, 184, 64, 

169,1, 141,173,192, 173,141, 102, 141 , 146, 

162,141,3,299,173,144,102,330 
QK 960 DATA 141 , 147, 102 , 141, 6 , 290, 169, 215 

,140,140, 162,162, 0,189, 175,182, 153,9, i 

07,299,232,224,9,288,244,513 
OP 979 DATA 96,173, 14B, 192, 141,151,192,56 

,173,146,192,141,151, 162, 2 3 3,8,281,26, 

176,21,16 9,9,141, 173,102, 551 
JC 900 DATA 172,140,102,162,0,170,153,0,1 

07, 2 00,232, 224 .9, 2 98, 24 7, 96,141, 148,18 

3,141,190,102,169,0,141,975 
KH 990 OAT A 152 , 192,174, 151, 102, 172 F 159, 1 

92,109,0,197, 15 3,8, 18 7, 93,8, 107,15 7,9, 

107.232,200,238, 152,192,924 
KK 1999 DATA 173,152,102,291,9,200,232,96 

,162,3,254,196,103*169,106,193,201,26, 

299,0,169,16,157,196,193,117 
vr 1010 DATA 202, 10, 2 39, 96, 96,7,6,7,9,7,9 

,7,9,7,6,7,9,42,49,45,43,43,36,49,0,96 
HA 1620 DATA 42,39,0,41,42,33,49,42.8,6,8 

,0,9,9,0,6,9,0,0,0,7,0,50,33,40,553 
35 103O DATA 37,8,47,36,48,49,45,35,59,8, 

8, 0,8, 7, 9,41, 31, 49, 51,??, ?0, 36, 49, 9, 41 

,286 
KB 1940 DATA 39, 47 , 42, 49 , 33 , 49 p 56 , 8, 8, 9 , 8 

,9,0,0,9,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,590 
DH 1858 DATA 14,30,40,62,120,128,128,129, 

132, 1 32, 132, 132, 131 r 128, 126, 123, D,E* 99 

,5,99,5,99,5,99,674 
ZU I860 DATA 5,99,224,101,224,191,148,100 

,5,99,224,191,224,191,134,199,5,99,224 

* 191 , 224 , 101 , 5 , 99 , 1 , SZ3 
ST 1070 DATA 255,255,1,1,1,1,1,9,0,0,9,9, 

6, 0,0, 253* 251, 5* 3, 120,120, 129,128, 132, 

132,294 
QJ 1990 vflTA 132,132,0,9,9,0,0,9,8,8,0,8, 

0,0,100,109,110,111,0,2,4,6,0,10,12,30 
ZC 1099 0ATA 14, 14, 12.10,9, 6, 4,2, 9,9, 0,36 

,36,36,0,36,36,0,0,36,0,0,9,0,0,324 
HY 1109 DATA 8,9,9,9,8,9,0,8,8,8,8,8,0,8, 

6,0,0,9,0*0,0,0,0,0,0,324 
IB 1110 DATA 8,0,9,9,0,0,0,0,6,0,0,0,6,0, 

9,0,0,0,0,O,0,6,0 F 0,9,3 24 
OP 1129 DATA 9,8,0,0,0,0,0,9,9,0,0,8,9,0, 

9,9,0*112,66,191,103*16,120,71,91,192 
AC 1130 DATA 193, 32,69, 111, 103, 69,111, 183 

,40,111, 103, 69, 111 ,103, 68, 111 ,103, 60*1 

11,103,66,111,193,60,111,390 
JW 1140 DATA 103,60,111,103,06,111*103,00 

,111*103,68,111,103,60,111,103,68,111, 

193, 68 , ill, 193,68, 111, IS?, 749 
0M 1150 DATA 68,111,103,60,111,103,68,111 



JB 
CM 

an 

6K 

UK 
VT 
60 

RB 

Gft 

LL 

HH 
6ft 

TS 

CD 

BH 

TW 

60 

LF 

T6 

oo 
OP 
BR 
JH 



hi 
RP 

DC 

CJU 
EL 
HP 

EB 

PM 
EH 
IS 



,103,00,111,103,60,111,193,196, 11 1 , 193 
,60,111,193,69,111 , 103,68, 2 81 

1169 DATA lli,193,69,lll,lO3,65,0,103j 
34, 3 7, 33, 41, 42, 35, 39 ,39,0,41,35, J* ,49, 
36,0,10,16,367 

1170 DATA 16,16,16,5,4,3,4,3,4,3,4, 3,4 
,3,4,3,4,3,4, 3*4,3,4,3,4,5 14 

1180 DATA 3,4,3,4,3,4,3,4*3,4,3,4,3,4, 

3, 4,3,6, 7,9, 7, 8,7,8,7,607 

1190 9ATA 0,7,0, 7*0,7, 9,7,9, 4?>33, 38,3 

6,0,39,44,36,49,9,0,9,0*0,0,9,960 

1299 DATA 0,6,9, 8>9, 8,9,8, 46, 45,43,46, 
0,41,35, 19,40,36,6,16,16,16,16,16,0,45 
1 

1210 DATA 8,34,3 7,33,41,4 2,36,40,41,8, 

0,0,9,2.0,2,8,2,8,2,8,0,9,0,0,763 

1228 PAT A 8,6, 8, 6,9, 0*9, 8,8, 9, 9, 6, 9,0, 

6,0,0,9,0,9,0,0,9,0*0,763 

1236 DATA 0,0*0,0,0,0,126,153,165,219* 

219,165,153,126,24, 153, 169, 231, 219, 255 

, 165 * 6 8 * 155 , 198, 10 B , 756 

1249 DATA 155,236,57,57,230,230,57,97, 
239, 155, 106, 198, 155, 3,3,3 r 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 19 
2*192,197,192,377 

1250 DATA 192,192,192,192,56,26,126,12 
7,126,20,56,0*14,20,63*127,63,20,14,0, 
9,112,56,24,24,245 

1269 DATA 56,112,0,126,153,165,219,219 
,165*153, 126,9,24,24,126,24,2 4,9, 9,8,9 
,9,9,9,24,985 

1270 DATA 24,48,0,9,0,126,9,0,9,8,8,0, 
0*9,9,24,24,0*9,6*12,2 4,48,95,64,401 
1286 DATA 0,124,254,296,214,214,239,25 
4, 124, 24, 56, 128, 56, S6 , S6 , 2 54, 2S 4, 6 0,12 
6 , 102 * 14 , 2 8 , 56 , 2S4 , 2 5 4 , 871 

1298 DATA 2 5 4,254,26,56,28,286,254,124 
,12,20,60,186,206,254,254,12,254,254,2 
24,252,14,206,254,124,60,651 

1300 DATA 124,224,252,190,196,254,124, 
2 54,25 4,14, 2 8,56, 112,112,112,124, 2 54, 1 
90 , 124 , 198 , 1 99 , 2 54 , 1 24 , 1 2 4 , 2 5 4 ,819 
1318 DATA 198,126,14,29,56,112,0,0,24, 
24,0,24,24,9,9,0,24,24,8, 24,24,40,0,12 
, 24,635 

1320 DATA 48,24,12,6,0,8,8,126,8,8,126 

, , 9 , 96 , 46 , 24 , 12 , 24 , 40 , 96 , O , 8 , 68 , 1 92 , 1 

2,459 

1338 DATA 24,8,24,8,0,69,182,110,110,9 

6,62,8, 248,246,284,238,118,126,102*238 

, 240,248 , 204 , 230 , 118 , 633 

1349 DATA 220, 198 , 252, 128 , 254, 238 , 192 , 

224, 116, 62, 39 ,120,254 ,226, 248, 224, 114, 

62,39, 96,224,224,224,226, 116,923 

1356 DATA 62, ?9,192, 227, 247, 255,219, 19 

5,99, 231, 128, Z54,Z3B, 190, 230, 110, 54,30 

,248,248,204,230,246,228,296,516 

1366 DATA 206,252,230,2 26,129,26,142,1 

98,254,254,254,56,28,28,20,20,28,120*2 

54,239,192,2 30,230, 126,52,328 

1378 DATA 199,190,190,230,246,254,124, 

56,126,0,126*60,28,30,62,126,231,231,2 

47, 255, 255, 247,231, 231,254, 572 

1300 DATA 254,230,224,252,248,224,224* 

289,236,252*220*294,204,204,229,238, 19 

8, 214, 21 4, 254, 254, 238, 198, 296, 2Z9,Z02 

1390 DATA 246,240,240,220,206*286,240, 

240,220,206,190*230,124,248,9,0,0,0,9, 

0,9,0,0,0,0,292 

1400 REM * 2475BYTES 

1419 REM LIST TO PRINTER BLAST , BAS 

1420 LPRIMT "START OF 6 ASIC LOADER . " : t. 
PRINT fLPRINT 

1430 FOR H=100 TO 369 STEP 18 

1449 LIST "P;",N,H:LPHINT "■■ 

1450 MEHf H 

1460 LPflINT "START OF HACKINE CODE OAT 

A."5LPRIWT SLPRINT 

1470 FOR N-l.VlO TO 1399 STEP IB 

1480 LIST "PS" P N,N;LPNIHT »» 

1490 HEKT H 

1588 LPRIMT ! I PRINT It PRINT lk EHD OF PR 

OGHAM" 



Page 6 - Issue 37 IS 






REVIEW 



CAN DAVID BEAT 
GOLIATH? 



About eighteen months ago Martin Bryant caused quite a stir 
when he released his Colossus 4 (C4) chess program on the Atari 
8-bit machines, In competitions it thrashed 22 other leading 
home computer chess programs, including White Knight, Sargon 
III and Cyruss II, so it is obviously a very capable performer. I 
wondered how I could possibly review it, as even the old Atari 
chess cartridge can beat me? 

The recent release of Colossus X (CX) for the ST gave me an 
idea. Why not use CX on the ST to tell me the moves to make 
against C4 on the 1 3DXE? That should bolster the old brainpower 
up a bit! And not only would it match program against prog- 
ram, but aha 8 -bit against ST - a real battle of the giants, or 
should that be David versus Goliath? 

Both programs are very similar in features offered, but as 
expected the ST version is faster, and graphically and sonkally 
superior. The description below applies to both versions unless 
otherwise stated. 

MULTILINGUAL CHESS 

Unlike C4, CX is multi-lingual and has English, French, Ger- 
man, Spanish, and Italian options. The default is chosen and 
stored the very first time you play., but can be changed at any 
time if needed. There's also a language file editor provided, so 
you can cu5tomi.se it to any other language you want. 
On bootup youre presented with a 3D view of the board and 
chess pieces, and CX allows you to tilt and rotate It to your 
liking If preferred you can easily switch to a 2D view. The board 
edges are lettered and numbered, providing the standard algeb- 
raic reference notation for each square. Various areas on the 
screen are used for action prompts, messages, and algebraic 
display of the computer's latest move. 
A second screen, toggled via the spacebar, shows a wealth of 
Information about the game in progress. This Includes players' 
names, chess clocks showing elapsed times for each player's 
moves, and a list of each player's last seven moves. 

WATCH COLOSSUS THINK! 

You can also witness the Colossus 'thought processes'- This 
shows his prediction of YOUR next move., lookahead search 
depth to find HIS best move, current line under investigation, 
number of different positions considered, and best line found so 
fur. This last Item is shown in terms of physical moves plus a 
quantified evaluation of them, or put simply: whether he thinks 
he's winning or losing. 

This screen, of course, provides vital information about what 



COLOSSUS 4 

8-Bit: Disk £14.95, Cassette £9.95 

COLOSSUS X 

ST: £24.95 

Both from CDS Software 



CAN COLOSSUS ON 

THE XL/XL BEAT 

COLOSSUS ON THE ST? 

JOHN S DAVISON REFEREES 

AS THEY SLOG IT OUT 



course Colossus thinks the game will take. In my case he credits 
me with a lot more chess sense than I've got! C4 does this 
evaluation at about 330 moves PER SECOND, while CX works at 
around 500 per second, just like a human opponent Colossus 
continues thinking about his moves while you're considering 
your$. So - ponder too long and you'll find he's had time to 
consider oodles of additional possibilities. 

Obviously, when up against this level of mental horsepower, 
you may not win very often {or ever, in my case!). Thankfully, 
the author has provided facilities for giving Colossus a lobotomy 
if you feel your ego threatened. These include such jolly japes as 
time limiting his moves; forcing him to make your move for you; 
preventing him from thinking ahead during your turn, from 
predicting! your next move r and from using his book of opening 
moves (3000 in C4, 1 1000 in CX), You can also interrupt his 
train of thought and force him to move immediately. Perhaps 
there's hope for me yet? 

CX also has a learning capability - he can extend his book of 
11^000 opening mows with promising new ones found during 
ploy, making him stronger the more he plays. This book is held 
on disk and there's a book editor provided for experts to set up 
their own book openings for special purposes. 

AT YOUR COMMAND 

There are lots of other commands too, giving you a wide range 
of control C4 has extra 'cosmetic' commands to change screen 
colours to your taste, but with CX you're stuck with those 
provided, 

Both programs have setup commands permitting you to arrange 
the pieces for any legal position, to choose black or white pieces, 
and to change the board orientation - with CX having options 
for playing riyht-to-left and left-to-right as well as the up/down 
options of C4. You can also set the playing mode, choosing from 
Tournament, Average r Equality, Infinite and Problem modes. 
Tournament mode allows you to specify the number of moves to 
be made in given time periods. Average mode lets you set an 
overall average time per move. Different values can be set for 
you and the computer, introducing another method of handicap- 
ping, In Equality mode Colossus tries to match his playing speed 
to yours, while in Infinite mode he searches ALL combinations of 
moves (up to twelve ahead) to find the best one. This could take 
a 1-o-n-g time, so there's an interrupt mechanism provided to 



16 Rage 6- I**ur i7 



» fcw 







force him to use the best one found so far if you get fed up of 
wailing. 
Problem mode is used for solving chess problems of the type 

often seen in newspaper chess columns. First, there's the normal 
"White to move and mate Black in x moves' type, os handled by 
most chess programs. Bui then Colossus has the unique ability to 
solve the more difficult 'self mate' and 'helpmate 1 problems, too. 
C4 makes minima] use of sound, being limited to a few optional 
beeps and burbles at appropriate points. CX can do fur more 
though, with a choice of beeps, music, speech, or silence. On 
selecting music you can then choose to hear classical pieces by 
Chopin r Debussy, Beethoven, or Gounod playing away in the 
background. Personally, I found this distracting and much pre- 
ferred the speech option. This uses a software driven speech 
synthesiser to speak the prompts and messages appearing on the 
main screen, including each move CX makes. 

ACTION REPLAY 

Colossus stores every move mode in a game, so you can step 
backwards and forwards through them at will. This mokes it 

possible to see an action replay, recover from a disastrous move, 
or to go back several moves and try out a different strategy, 
There's game save and load features so you don't have to finish 
o game at one sitting. It also allows you to build a library of 
problems and games, with 19 problems supplied with C4 (disk 



version only) and 10 in CX to get you started, You can load these 
and solve them yourself, or let Colossus show you a step-by-step 
solution. In addition, complete games are provide*! (34 with C4 
disk only, 29 with CX), some from matches involving famous 
players like Korchnoi and Karpov, 

Finally, there ore a few novelty features. You can give Colossus 
severe brainache by making him play against himself. Or, you 
can scramble the contents of your own cranium by using 'invisi- 
ble' mode, making either or both sets of pieces invisible, thus 
simulating blindfold chess, 

IN PLAY 

Moves are controlled in three ways: algebraic notation input via 
the keyboard; arrow keys- to directly position the cursor on 'from' 
and 'to J squares; or with joystick on C4 and mouse on CX, For 
beginners there's a Help feature, where Colossus will show you 
all the legal moves available for any piece on the board. And as 
you'd expect, he handles castling, en passant captures and 
promotions without problem. 

With C4 the moves are instantaneous r with the piece disappear- 
ing from one square and instantly reappearing in the chosen 
one. In CX, the piece slides to its chosen destination making the 
move easier to follow. Also, in CX you can change the normal 
cursor to a large hand whie:h can pick up a selected piece and 
manually move it to the required square. Neat, but slower than 
the sliding method. 

In play, both versions of Colossus behaved exactly as I feared. 
Slugged down to micro-cretin level they still wiped the floor with 
me when I played unaided. Actually, CX can be set to play to 
LOSE or DRAW as well as win, but pride wouldn't let me use this 
option! 

THE BATTLE 

So. with dented ego I played the two machines off against each 
other. The first review copy of CX 1 had was very unreliable and 
crashed at the slightest provocation. It seemed this was an early 
pre-release copy, which didn't work properly on older ST's like 
mine. CDS promptly replaced it with the latest version which was 
much better, but still crashed occasionally, usually when select- 
ing menu items. C4 behave impeccably. 
Twelve games were played during the review period. They 
ranged in duration from a short game of 53 moves in 23 minutes 
to a fairly lengthy 186 moves in 70 minutes. I found the results 
surprising - C4 won 5, CX won 5, and two were drawn. C4 r s 
victories were always preceded by CX resigning before being 
checkmated, but 1 forced each game through to its conclusion so 
the vkiories were complete. When C4 lost he always played 
through to the bitter end and doesn't seem to hove the ability to 
resign. 

Unexpectedly, CX seemed slower in response than C4, although 
this could have been the subjective effect of CX J s frequent refer- 
ence to its disk based opening moves book during the early part 
of a game. C4's book is memory resident, so operates quicker. 

AND THE WINNER IS „„ 

On the evidence found during the review there's not much to 
choose between these programs. However, l r m awarding a moral 
victory to C4 (loud cheers from the 8-bit cam pi) considering its 
performance against CX h s superior speed and facilities. 
Both programs are great fun and tremendous value for money, 
but the additional £10 for CXdoes buy same nice extras. I 
particularly liked its clearer graphics, adjustable board view r and 
amusing speech option. Advanced players will appreciate its 
more esoteric features too. But whether expert or beginner, ST or 
8-bit user, you can buy either version confident that you're 
getting state-of-the-art code. If you need a chess program, you 
need Colossus, • 



Page 6 - Issue 37 17 



UTILITY 






FINDER 



A utility from 
Robert De Letter to trace 
keywords and phrases in 
your programs 



In the last issue of Page 6 there was a program for Flight 
Simulator I] that was set up specifically for a printer but the 
instructions stated that you could change all LPR1NT com- 
mands to PRINT if you were not lucky enough to own a printer. 
Quite easy to do provided you can find all the LPRINT state- 
ments, but you are bound to miss some, don't you always? 
There must be many times when it would be useful to change a 
particular statement or wording in a listing and it would be 
handy to have the computer show you every occurrence of the 
word you are looking for. With this in mind FINDER was born. 
There are utilities around that will automatically change vari- 
able names for you but not keywords or phrases. Whilst FINDER 
doesn't actually change the program for you, it will find any- 
thing and allow you to note the line number so that you can edit 
a program in the normal way. 

Type in FINDER and save a copy When you want to use it make 
a copy of the program you wish to change, in LISTed format and 
save that file with the filename TJ: LISTED JMT\ If you don't like 
that filename you can change the two occurrences of the file- 
name in the program to whatever you wish (use HNDEK!). Now 
run the FINDER program, answer whether you want a printed 
report or just to the screen, and type in whatever you want to 
find. All occurrences will be shown with the phrase highlighted 
in inverse on the screen. When you have finished the temporary 
LISTED.FMT program will be deleted from your disk. 
T hope that you find FINDER useful in changing your programs. 
Dont be afraid to improve on it for instance by allowing you to 
choose from several filenames, The cleverer programmers among 
you might also come up with a way to actually get FINDER to 
amend your program for you! 



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MERAK WINNERS 

Yen mil many entries for the competition probably hfiuuit t uninten- 
tionally mode the flnt question too hard (the othcro w*it a. doddle). 
There were only Threr iMttrles that were correct and thr winnKm are 
probably the 'old rnciT ol thf. Atari war-Id llike the Editor!), 1 cam 
r^rtietuber a young |*ff Mintor ol a PCW Show held at the Barbkon 
showing off his firit qoioc for the Atari called 1 urboflex (Gridrunncr 
wd» the next and his first big Atari hit) but H Uwk*. like only three 
other* went along (runny there seemed to be millions there!). Apologies 
to all 1h*t youn^Ntert who were probably only |ui1 in Nunery school at 
the time (yes,. |eW.. yo*i are aetting oldlj, well try to mnkc it easier next 
time. 

Anyway the three who gat U rldjht were D. Stanford of Kinross, Phil 
Brawn of Newquay {definitely one ol lb* old unsJ) and fon Hancock 
trnni Newcastle, We promised S copies as pdices so we dipped into the 
hut l«r another couple who put down GridrunnKr as the first answer 
and the Lucky two were Richard Dsborn from Leeds I :ni vr ™iy and D. 



UPDATE 

MUSIC BOX (ISSUE 36): There was a problem with line 

2275 of this listing which got chopped off at the end because the 
line was so long. The last statement on the line should read 
GOSUB 85. If you type it in you will hove to use abbreviations for 

the keywords. Alternatively you can split the line as follows 

AQ 2275 G05UB J,Sfcfl 

KJ 2276 SOUND QQ , 08 , PO * CI* : GRAPHICS 04 : SET 

COLOR C12,G2,Q2;SETC0L0R 04 j Q6> U4 : COLOfl 

QIIPLOT qiS.a^ibRAHTO 064,fl8!G05UB 65 



18 Page *> - Issue 37 






Be part of the action 

^ATARU 



MIDI 



All the latest hardware and software in (he rapidly 
expanding s^ene of micro music will he on dis- 
play, including keyboards, samplers, sequencers 
and professional studio software. 

With an Atari /Midi setup you can produce top- 
qualily musiCi quickly and simply - editing out 
mistakes in a way that's impossible with live 
recordings, So if you're in any way interested in 
making mu&k with your minn this is the place to 
come to find out all about it. 



CAD 



Computer Aided Design ha* grown to become one 
of the most important uses for modern computers. 

With a CAD system you can design houses, cars 
and electronic circuits - in a fraction of the time it 
would take you with pen and paper. 

With (he high speed and powerful graphics of 
Atari micros it's hardly surprising that bigger and 
better CAD programs are pushing back (he fron- 
Hers all (he time. 

And only at the Alari Computer Show can you 
see all the latest systems under one roof. 



Alexandra Palace! Wood Green, 

London N22 

Friday to Sunday, 

June 23 to 25, 1989 

Fri & Sat: 10am - fipm. 
Sun: iOarn - 4pm 



The Atari Computer Show is hazk - with 
many new products and devvlopmentSr Atari 
has grown to he one of the major players in the 
computer world, supported by an incredible 
wealth of top quality applications, games and 
utilities - all on view at this show, 



GAMES 



Atari computers are renowned for their ability to 
run fast-action arcade-quality games. 

The range of new software on show r will demon- 
strate how the power of these machines is con- 
tinually being stretched, producing faster and 
even more addictive games with sup ml) ;j:;l|- :m \. 

The winning entry in the STOS Games writer of 
the Year Award will be revealed, and several new 
exciting STOS accessories will be shown for the 
fifsl time. 

If you're a keen game player,, you'll find there's 
so much on offer at. the show - you're guaranteed a 
real triMt! 




DON'T MISS IT 



BUSINESS 



Many companies will be demonstrating their latest 
software and hardware, specially designed to 
release the full business potential of Atari com- 
puters. 

As well as products for the 8-hii and ST. you'll 
be able to try out applications for the powerful 
Atari PC compatible series. 

And you'll also be abte to get expert advice from 
professionals, 



gP|^H 



DTP 



The art of combining text and pictures is big busi- 
ness nowadays because, with a low cost DTP pro- 
gram, you can create anything From a club 
newsletter to a monthly magazine or book- 

At the show you'll be able to try out the latest 
scanners, digit isers and super-fast programs, and 
get a first-hand glimpse at the way DTP is set tn 
develop in the future. 



So for a great day out - whether you want to see 
whal the future holds for Atari computer users, 
take advantage of the bargains on offer or get 
advice on specific applications - the Atari Com- 
puter Show is the place to go. 

And if you send in the coupon now, you'll save 
£1 off the price of a single ticket! 

SPECIAL OFFER 

For the first time we are now offering a family 
ticket for just £11, allowing entry for two adults 
and two children. So you can save up to ffi off the 

usual entry pricet 

EoviloGeilhm 

Alexandra Palace is so easy to get to by car, 
rait, underground or bus. ft has its own British 
Rail station, just nine minutes, away from 
King's CrosSi and there's a free bus service 
shuttling between station and show every 10 
minntes- 

Ify&y 're travelling by road, the show is only 
15 minutes away from Junction 25 on theM25, 
Car parking is tee. 












■THE DATABASE EXHIBITIONS 


ADVANCE TICKET ORDER 



POST TO: Atari Computer Show Tickets. 
D*tab*s* Exhibitions, FREEPOSZ 
Eitesmara Port, South Worml LOS 3£ B. 

Please supply: 

□ Adult tickets at E4 (&ave £1 ) £_ 

D U nder 1 6s tickets, at ,50 \ save £!}..£_ 

□ Fam I ly trcket at E 1 1 (save £6) £_ 

Total E 



D Cheque payable to Database Efchibitbns 
D Please debit my Aec&ss/Vis-a card no; 

! I ■ J,J L-Ll 1 I I 1 I I I 1.1 I I J 

Expiry dste: I / "1 
Signed !rP „ „., 

Admission at door: Advance ticket orders 

£5 fadutts), must b# received by 

f3 SO {under IBs} Wednesday, June 14 



N h me ...„. „_ , B . . .,, 

Addrass ...,. . r , . . . 

ri „, Postcode 

PHONE OflDERS: RING Siw H«lMn E : 051-357 2M1 
PfiESTEL OflDEHS: KEY *&9 r THEN £14558383 
MKROLINK.TEIECOM GOLD OflDERS: 72:MAGOQ1 
Ptease quote credit card number and M add&ss 



AE5& 



PROGRAMMING 






MACHINE CODE 
LIBRARY 



Stephen Williamson starts a new series 
for programmers in machine code or 
BASIC with ready to run routines that 
you can use in your own programs 



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Above: CLtAR routirie in Assembly 

Right: Source code for CLEAR in Bp&ic 



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Most machine coJe programmers build 
up a library of subroutines that perform 
frequently needed tasks such as moving 
sections of RAM, setting up the Atari Play- 
er Missile system, saving and accessing 
disk file? etc. This series will provide you 
with u library of machine code subroutines 
that will easily fit into machine code prog- 
rams and for non machine code program- 
mer^ Ive adapted the library routines for 
usti within BASIC programs, so that you 
can lake advantage of the extra speed that 
machine code provides. It is not necessary 
to know anything about machine code 
programming to use them, but a good 
knowledge of BASIC helps. 
All the assembly listings can be used mi 
both the MAC/65 (the best Assembler on 
the market fur the Atari 8-bit) and the 
Atari Assembler Editor (sluggish, but it 
does the |ob)j and can be easily adapted 
for use with any Atari assembler program. 
HEX numbers are not used in the listings 
as this makes it more difficult to under- 
stand for the inexperienced machine code 
programmer - and tesides my brain likes 
thinking in decimal. 

CLEARING AND MOVING RAM 

The first two library routines will erase 

sections of RAM and move portions of 
RAM from one address to another. There 
are many uses for these routines: erasing 
and moving player missiles,, clearing sec- 
tions of screen RAM, resetting registers to 
zero, copying sections of ROM to RAM r 
setting up redefined character sets - and 
many more. 

Each routine starts at memory location 
20000, but can be easily changed to start 
at any section of RAM. The routines con- 
tain no JMP or JSR instructions which 
mean that they are completely relocatable 
Lc. they con be moved to any section of 
RAM without problems.. This also means 
that when constructing the BASIC versions 
the routines can be held in string variables 
thus avoiding any clash with other sec- 
lions of a BASIC program. 



M Page * Issue 37 




ADAPTING THE ROUTINES 

To adapt the Clear Memory routine for 
your particular application change the 
START and FINISH iabels, These, as their 
name suggests, define the start and finish 
points of the area of RAM la be cleared, If 
you want to coll up the routine more than 
once using different values for START and 
FINISH then you must first Iti-ad locations 
203 and 204 with the lobyte and hi byte 
values of your new start address and loca- 
tions 205 and 206 with the iobyle and 
hibyte values of the finish address, using a 
routine similar to that found in lines 160 
to 230 of the assembly listing. Then access 
the routine at the memory location repre- 
sented by the label SI (line 270 of the dear 
memory listing). 

The move memory routine can be adop- 
ted in a similar way - all you need to do to 
customise the routine to your specifica- 
tions is to alter the FROM, TOO and NUM- 
BER labels. The routine will then copy the 
specified number of bytes from one area of 
RAM to another. 

BASIC VERSIONS 

The source code for the BASIC versions of 
the routines is similar to the pure machine 
code versions, except that the start and 
finish parameters etc. are pulled of the 
stack with the PLA instruction and then 
stored in zero page. Remember when using 
parameters passed from a BASIC program, 
the first PLA instruction gives the number 
of puna meters, the second the hibyte value 
of the first parameter, the third the lobyte 
value of the first parameter and so on. 

The BASIC program subroutines load the 
machine code data into string variables 
and are called from within a BASIC prog- 
ram using the command: 

A^TJSR<ADR(gTfflKG$:>) 

List the BASIC subroutines to disk or cas- 
sette using the LIST "C :" or LIST 
T D:xxxxxxxx.xxx" commands, then 
attach them to the end of your program 
by simply entering them using the KN [ b'.R 
*C:* or ENTER "Dixxxxxxxx.xxx" com- 
mand. To set up the clear routine use 
GOSUB 30000, and GOSUB 31000 far the 
move routine. 

To call the clear routine use the 
command: 

A=USRC ADR( CLEAH$ ) , START, FIMCSH) 

where START and FINISH define the area 
of RAlvi to be deored. 

The move routine is colled by: 



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Above: MOVE routine In Assembly 

Right: Source code for MOVE in Basic 







LB ? MACHINE tOet LIBRARY 

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OVERLEAF - THE ROUTINES IN 

BASIC PLUS A GREAT DEMO SHOWING 

HOW THEY MIGHT BE USED 



A=UWADRtMGYE$) t FROM- 
,T0O h NUMBEEO 

where FROM is the start of the FLAM area 
to be copied, TOO is the area to be copied 
to unci NUMBER is the number of bytes to 
be copied, 

THE ROUTINES IN USE 

The demonstration program is cm exam- 
ple of hoiv to use the subroutines in a 
BASIC program. The screen Is filled with 
hearts and a message printed on the cen- 
tre of the screen. The move machine code 
routine then copies the whole of the screen 
display to a buffer, or temporary store 



urea. The clear routine then clears the 
screen display., before the move routine 
fetches the screen data from the buffer and 
re-dlsplays it 

The second part of the program copies the 
standard Atari character set to a section of 

RAM starting at location 36864. The char- 
acter set pointer is changed to point to this 
address (line 220) and then portions of the 
character set are copied from RAM to ROM 
to give the scrolling effect. 
I hope that these routines prove useful to 
you. Check out the demonstration listing 
und try to adopt it to you own use. Next 
time I "LI bring you some more routines 
that wil] enhance your programs whether 
written in Assembly or Bask. 



I'uyt - U Ismj€ - .\? 21 



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REM WKMHhV M MK«)fW W MMMHKh>f H XX>tX^KWMM 
REM « MACHINE CODE LIBRflftY * 

GEM * Fftr A* ART HL/HE * 

ttEH * Dt-Honstration 1 * 

REM * by Stephen Hilliansori * 

REM * - * 

REM * PAGE G MA&AZIHE - ENGLAND * 
HEM W«MKH>miff i mi i WMMMMWWM»MMfcMHH|iH > tM 
REM 

Ott 50 GOSUB 3D0flO:GO5UB 31000 

HW 60 GRAPHICS BrSETCOLOR 2 , O, : SfcTCOt Oft 

VE 70 5M=PEEitCa8)+256*PEEKC£33 

ZP 0O DIM MESS5E123 ; O4JFFER=3008O 

NU 30 POKE 752,255 

GZ ICO A = USR£ADIICCLEAR$3 , SM, SM+9593 

EP 110 FOR I-O TO 959! POKE SM+I, 64 ! HEKT I 

SF 129 POSITION 18,11!? "FIBWiHIMil'IMM'I't 

[Has* 1 

DY 1IO POSITION 10,12;? 



DEM(JHSrfifltIfl 



MK 140 FOR 1=0 TO 5 

WS 150 FOR D = TO 100 ; MEKT & 

VI 160 A^USRfADRCHOUE$> , 5M, BUFFER, 3683 

HY 178 A=U5RCADRCCLEAR$» , 5M. SM+968J 

HY ISO FOE D=8 TO lOOtMEHT & 

UK 150 A=U5RCADRCnDUE$3 .BUFFER, SM r 9603 

f% 2©B NEXT I 

TV 210 A-U5R tflOR CfWVESJ F BUFFER, 3M, 3603 

GK 220 POKE 756 , 144 : A TU5R (ADR CHBUE53 . 5734 

4,5*064, 10243 

NO 250 FOR 1-512 TO 760 

MG 240 A = II5RCi!hf>RCH0VES> , 57344+1 ,36854+512 

,2563 

EM 250 MEKT IlCOTO 2X0 

UQ 30000 REM 

HY 30010 REM 



CLEAR MC ROUTINE 



StOPh^rh Ui idM^Ah 



MACHINE CODE 
LIBRARY 



gO 30000 
HY 30016 
MT 30010 
OM 70050 
5K 3004B 

SH3 
K5 30050 
UF 30O68 
AH 30070 
EF 30009 
KV 30090 
,104,1 
45,203 
LB 30100 
97,206 
,B,2B6 

trf 3O110 



H I^Aft MC ROUTINE 



Stephen Ni n a^son 



«>M 
REM 

REM 

REM Call with: 

REM A=U5R CAOfi CC LE AflS } , START ( Flit I 

MM CLEARS C4S3 

FDD 1=1 TO 47: READ A 

CLEARS EI , 13 = CHRS (A3 3 HEHT I 

RETURN 

DATA 104, 104, 133,204*104, 133*203 

33,206,104, 133,203,160,0,169*0,1 

, 165 

DATA 203,197,205,200,7,165,204,1 

p 208, 1, 36, 24 , 2 3 0,20 3,165, 2 03 , 2fll 

DATA 2,230,204,1*2,255,200,224 



The CLEAR routine in BASIC 



MOUE HC ROUTINE 



u Stephen Hi I I : 



MT 30010 REM 

OK 30030 REM Call With! 

OH 30040 REM A-USR <»&» CCLEARS , START, FINIS 

m 

KS 30056 DIM GLEAR${463 

UF 30060 FOR 1=1 TO 47: READ A 

AU 10070 CLEAR? CI, 13 -CHHS tftl :NEKT I 

EF 30090 RETURN 

HO 30090 DATA 104,1*4,133, 204,104,133,203 

, 104,133,206. 104,133, 205, 160,8, 169,0,1 

45, 203,165 
LB 3O100 DATA 203 , 137 , 205 , 288, 7, 165, £04 , 1 

9?j 205,208,1,36,24,230,203,165,283,201 

IH 30110 DATA 2 , 230 , 204 , 132 , 25S , 206 , 224 

TL 31080 REM 

I A 31010 REM 

MU 31020 REM 

00 31030 REM Call With: 

EQ 31040 REM A-USR CADR CH0UE5) . FROH, ID , HUM 

BER3 
HZ 51050 DIM HGUESC75 3 
VK 31068 FOR 1=1 TO 74 
HZ 31070 READ O sMOUES CI , 13 =CHRf C*J 
CT 31000 NEKt I 
EL 310*0 RETURN 
DY 31100 DATA 104,104,13 3,204,104,133.203 

,104,133.206,104,133,205,104,170,104, 1 

08, lift ,192,255 
%Z 31U0 DATA 200,1,202,13 2,207,134,200,1 

60, Op 177, 203, 145, 205,138, 207,165,207, 2 

01 „ 255,200 
KJ 31120 PATA 9,190,288,165,206,201,255,2 

08,1,36,230,203,165,203*201,0,200,2,23 

0,204 
EB 31130 DATA 230,205,165.205,201.0,206,2 

, 230 , 2*6 , 132 , 255 , 200, 211 






ABOVE - the CLEAR and 
MOVE routines in action 



TL 

IA 
MM 

00 


3 180 A 
31010 
31020 
31819 








REM 


FUJUE MC ROUTX*£ 




REN 


bu Stythtm Williirtson 








REM 


for PAGE 6 




REM 


Call with; 




00 


3104O 

mem 


REM A = U5R CAM: CMOUES* , FROM, TOD , NU 


HZ 


31050 


DIM H0UESC751 


VH 


3 1860 


FOR 1=1 TO 74 


HE 


31070 


READ A;ttOVE£<I,I3=CHftSCA3 


GT 


51000 


NEKT I 


ft 


31098 


RETURIf 


DY 


31180 


DATA 104,104,133.204,104,133,203 




, 104,133,2O£, 104, £ 33, 20S , 1 04, 170 » 104,1 




66,136, 192* 255 


SZ 


31110 


DATA 28B,1,202,132, 207,134, 208,1 




60 ,8,177,283, 145, 285, 130, 207, 165, 207, 2 




01,255, 200 


kj 


31120 


DATA 9, 13S,20B, 165, ?0S, 201,255, 2 




00, 1,96,230, 283, 165, 203,201,0,200,2,25 




0,284 




ES 


31138 


DATA 230,265,16^,205,201,0,286,2 




, 230,286,192,255,208, 211 



The MOVE routine in BASIC 



22 Page 6- Issue 37 








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REVIEW 



Sparta Dos 




New products from 1CD always send shock waves of excite- 
ment around the Atari 8-bit world, and this one Is no 
exception. It's the long rumoured development of [CD's 
excellent SpartaDOS 3.2 tre viewed in Issue 32) culled Sparta DOS 
X, which takes Atari disk users to new heights in terms of 
facilities, performance, and operational convenience. 
For the uninitiated, SpartaDOS is designed as a replacement for 
Atari DOS r the disk operating system you would normally use 
with an Atari disk drive. A disk operating system is a collection 
of special programs which enable you to store, retrieve, and 
manage programs and data on disk. Atari DOS is adequate for 
general purpose use, but more advanced users often wish si had 
more facilities - which is exactly what SpartaDOS X has in 
abundance. 

1CD have been shipping SpartaDOS X with a temporary manual 
in the USA, pending the completion of the fully detailed final 
version. The review copy had the temporary version too, but 
Frontier Software tell me that all UK copies of SpartaDOS X will 
be supplied with the final version If this is anything like pre- 
vious SpartaDOS documentation it should be first class. 

CARTRIDGE BASED 



SpartaDOS X Is totally different from Atari DOS Even its storage 
medium is different - it's CARTRIDGE based, and it's a very 
special cartridge at that! It uses a whopping 64K of bank switch- 
ed ROM to hold the code You've heard of a RAMdisk? Well, this 
is more like a ROMdlskl 4SK of the ROM is mapped out like a 
disk drive, so if you perform a directory list on it you're shown a 
list of program files - just as if they were held on disk As it's a 
ROM (Read Only Memory) cartridge you can't write anything to 
it, though. 

The main advantages of the cartridge approach over the more 
usual disk are fast access speed, disk space savings, and sheer 
convenience. Most DOS systems keep their component programs 
on disk and these get loaded in when required. If you have only 
one disk drive you have to either copy the DOS components onto 
your working disk (taking up valuable disk space) or swap your 

working disk for the DOS 
disk every time some- 




thing needs loading. 
With SpartaDOS X 
there's none of this, as 
everything is available 
from the cartridge. Its 
like having an addition- 
al high speed disk drive 
just for SpartaDOS, 
The lop of the cartridge 
contains a cartridge slot, 
so you can plug another 
cartridge into it. This Is 
really intended for use 
with programming lan- 
guage cartridges, but I 



reviewed 

by 

John S Davison 



found my original Atariwriter cartridge and all my old favourite 
■ jiiine cartridges worked too. The only failure was AtariArtist, 
which although it would run r seemed unable to do any disk I/O 
for saving and loading pictures. I CD do warn you that there may 
be odd programs that won't work with SpartaDOS, so if you have 
a particularly important program you want to use with lt r check 
before buying, 

IBM COMMAND COMPATIBILITY 

Unlike Atari DOS, SpartaDOS X is essentially command driven. 
In use, previous veroons of SpartaDOS reminded me of IBM 
PC-DOS (alright, MS-DOS if you really insist), although its com- 
mand names were different. 1CD have now taken this to its 
logical conclusion and provided additional alternative command 
names Identical to those in PC-DOS Note - this does NOT mean 
SpartaDOS X can run IBM PC programs, just that both systems 
use the same commands to perform similar functions. Command 
syntax is very similar too r so now if you learn SpartaDOS X 
you'll soon feel at home with an IBM PC This could provide 
useful experience for people who move on to a PC later in their 
education or employment. 

To prove the point my seven year old son Peter (admittedly an 
absolute computer freak!) was able to happily operate my IBM 
'PC Convertible' laptop computer after just a few hours use of 
SpartaDOS X - something he's never done before. This included 
working with subdirectories, a topic which seems to confuse or 
even frighten many PC users, 

ATARI XF55I SUPPORTED! 

One of Sparta DOS s great strengths has always been its support 
of many different kinds of disk drive. SpartaDOS X can handle 
single sided disks of 90K single density, 127K 1050 enhanced 
density, and 1S0K double density. It ojso handles double sided, 
double density 36QK drives, including the new Atari XFS5 1 device 
which even Atari, don't fully support yet! RAMdisk* and hard 
disks are supported, and for the adventurous it will also handle 
8' and 3.5" drives, assuming you can find an interface with 
which to attach them. Up to NINE drives may be used at once r in 
any combination of speed, density, and format- 



24 Page 6 -Issue 37 







ICD show that the 
8-bit Atari is still at the 

top with the most 
comprehensive DOS yet 



High speed modifications aren't forgotten either, with support 
provided for the Happy board and SCO's own US Doublet [re- 
viewed in Issue 32). It even supports high speed operation on. the 
rarely seen Indus GT drives, And for even more performance it 
can use the 130XE's bank switched memory as a disk cache! 
You don't have to worry about using different formats either, as 
SpartaDOS automatically recognises them. It had no problems 
reading any of my disks, arid switched between single, enhanced, 
and double density disks in SpartaDOS and Atari DOS formats 
completely transparently. It also coped with standard and 
skewed sector tracks for US Doubler high speed data transfer 
without trouble. 

At disk level SpartaDOS X uses volume labels, ond also provides 
support for subdirectories (like folders on the ST) nested to any 
level you want, with up 1 ,432 entries in each - great for hard disk 
users. Commands are available to create and delete subdirector- 
ies, and to set the access path through to the level needed. Files 
can then be freely created, copied, and deleted in any subdirec- 
tory as required. 

Subdirectory operations may be performed by directly entered 
commands or via a menu system, itself invoked by a command. 
This displays several scrollable windows showing a disk's sub- 
directory 'tree' structure and the files contained in any chosen 
'branch -1 of it. Menu selections are available for viewing, print- 
ing, renaming, deleting, and copying any file shown. Files can be 
handled singly or as a batch, as you can selectively tag/untag 
files in the list and then perform a given operation on the whole 
group - a really useful facility. Menu selections are also available 
for creating and deleting subdirectories at any level. 
SpartaDOS has time and dale stamping for files, provided by an 
internal software driven clock. Current time and date can be 
permanently displayed on an extra line at the top of the screen, 
where it's updated every second. Unlike earlier versions of Spar- 



systems. ICD can also supply a battery driven clock cartridge 
called R-TIME 8. This plugs Into the SpartaDOS X cartridge, 
removing the need to set the date and time at every boot up. 

BUILT-IN ARCHIVING 

Another feature in SpartaDOS X is its ARC facility, based on and 
compatible with the system used on the IBM PC and many other 
systems. It can take a group of files and compress them into a 
single archive file which takes up far less disk space than the 
originals. You can even encrypt them if needed. When required 
for use, they can be decompressed and split back into their 
original form. You're likely to meet this particularly if you dial 
into bulletin board systems, where much of the material is held 
in ARC fonnat to save space and cut download time. 
Amongst its many other features are commands for file protec- 
tion; for hiding files from prying eyes; for finding files you've 
stored somewhere in a subdirectory structure, but can't remem- 
ber where; for unerasing files you've accidentally deleted; and for 
displaying Hies in hexadecimal and ASCII form. You can use 
batch files to execute sequences of Sparta DOS commands, to 
which up to nine user defined parameters can be passed. I/O 
redirection is also available for routing command input and 
output to devices other than the defaults. The cartridge also 
contains a file called XEP80.SYS, which presumably means you 
can use SpartaDOS X in 80 column mode usinij the Atari XEPSO! 
The documentation did not mention this feature but Frontier 
Software have since confirmed that the XEP 80 is supported. 
Most commands available in previous versions of SpartaDOS 
are here r although a few are missing or replaced by new func- 
tions. It's still possible to run external commands from disk, so 
you could run old disk based SpartaDOS commands or even 
write your own If you wished. 

For later release there's also the possibility of a SpartaDOS Tool 
Kit, supplying additional utility programs such as a disk sector 
editor. And, if necessary, ICD will provide cartridge upgrade 
chips at nominal cost if the base code has to change to correct 
hugs, etc. Both should be available through Frontier Software 

CONCLUSIONS 

Once again ICD have triumphed, bringing us yet another 
superb product that opens up a whole new world to the 8-bft 
user. They deserve the support and undying gratitude of every 
serious Atari user in the land, as do Frontier Software for making 
ICD products available in the UK at such reasonable prices. If 
you're thinking about upgrading your Atari's disk facilities, then 
make SpartaDOS X a priority purchase. Jfs probably the shrew- 
dest move you'll ever make. 



SpartaDOS X 

Published by ICD 

Distributed by Frontier Software 

Price £49.95 



Page 6 - Issue 37 25 



XL/XETYPE-IN 




unplotter 



Sun plotter is a some- 
what different applica- 
tion that may be use- 
ful for radio amateur* or for 
educational study and, hope- 
fully it will give yousome in- 
sight into how to draw de- 
tailed maps without using 
huge a mounts of precious 
memory. 

Sunplotter will show the pas- 
sage of the Sun over the earth 
and the user can discover the 
latitude and longitude of any 
place in the world and also 

discover the local time, When the date and time of day are 
entered, the program will draw an outline map of the world 
showing all the areas covered by the Sun's light. These areas, you 
will find, not only move according to the hour but, as the map 
is based on the Mercator projection, the Sun r s J footprint J will 
change its shape according to the season. The program will show 
sunlit land In yellow and sea in blue, while night-time land will 
be in black with the sea in grey. These colours should give clear 
contrasts if used with a black and while screen. 

Once the map is drawn a cursor will appear which can be 
moved about with a joystick while the text window will show the 
latitude and longitude under the cursor plus the time of Sunrise 
and Sunset of that place on the particular day chosen and by 
how many hours ahead of, or behind, GMT the local time is. 

WORKING OUT THE MAP 

En redrawing the map for the program the lines of latitude and 
longitude were made equidistant in order to make calculation 
easier. The area of the world included was from 67 degrees North 
to just over 63 degrees South which avoids the problem of 
deciding whether it is day, night or twilight at the Poles a certain 
times of the year. The modified map was divided into 160 
squares across by 80 squares down, making each 2.25 degrees 
of longitude wide by about 1-65 degrees of latitude high. These 
squares were allocated to land or sen but to fill in some of the 
blank areas some islands were designated land although smaller 
lhan half a square. 

To understand how the map is drawn by the computer you may- 
like to enter the following one line program 

10 GRAPHICS 3: FOR 1=1 TO 4- PRINT #6; CHR$CD;:HEXT I 
which will give you three coloured squares plus one square the 

26 Pflge 6 - Issue 37 




find out where the sun 

shines and what time it is 

anywhere in the world 



same colour as the back- 
ground. 

We could store the map by 
putting into data a series of 
l's and 2's according to 
whether we want to show 
land or water for that particu- 
lar square but if we use 
Graphics 7 r which gives 
Tea&onable detail, we would 
need to store 160 by 80 r or 
12,300 digits. Instead we store 
a number saying how many 
times either of the two colours 
is to be printed and the switch 
from one colour number to the other every time the col our run is 
completed. This switching is done by the expression R=l-R. Such 
a method reduces typing time and memory requirements though 
at the cost of some screen printing time, 
With regard to showing the change between sunlight and 
darkness, since we still have two colours to play with including 
the background colour, we shift the colour number up and down 
two places while the map is being drawn, the position at which 
the shift is to take place being calculated at the beginning of 
each line. The formulae used together with the declination calcu- 
lation at the start of the program gives times and positions 
within about 15 minutes of those quoted in a nautical almanac. 
Greater accuracy would require a much longer program which 
would delay the map drawing process considerably, 

USES OF SUNPLOTrER 

Radio Amateurs and listeners wilt find that having a complete 
picture of the sunlit and dark areas of the world helps treme- 
ndously in forecasting propagation paths on the short and 
medium wave hands. Others will no doubt find interesting uses 
for this type of information and maybe others wilt be able to 
come up with some more applications using the programming 
techniques given 

1 would like to offer my thanks to Dan whose useful suggestions 
were not always received at the time with the courtesy they 
deserved! 



by Peter Scott Welch 



sunplotter 



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EY 730 REM 



£>T BEGINNING Of E&CH LIHE 



:^LCEJLATE POSITION Of SUHRISE AHP SF I 



DM 74* L0N-TANREC*SIHCLAT1/CD5CLAT) 

HI 75* If L0N>1 THEM RI = * ! 5E-15* : GOTO 93* 

RH 76* IF LUH<-1 TMEN RI-16* ! 5E=ft S GOTO 05 

* 

MR 770 LON = -ATNfLON/ S Q R C-LONttL Q«+ 1 ) 3 + 90 

5N 700 LR=fL0N-Gl/2.25 

OE 7*0 lsz'Hoo-lon-o'z.zs 

MA 000 RI=LR*9E=LSlP=0 

I€ 010 IF LR<* THEM SC=LR+16* : RI=L5 : P"Z 

OE 02* IF LS>16« THEM BI=LS-16*:SE=Lft S P=2 

Wt 030 LAT-LAT-E 

FN 040 IF M>"RI AND N<=SE THEM Q=2"P 

AI 858 REM 

YR A60 ? »6;CHRS*0+HJ J 

GH B7B NEKT 1 

NJ 000 IF U=265 THEN 91* 

RC 898 GOTO 67R 

RT ?Ofl REM 

RC 91* H=M+45!Y=Y+13 

NG 920 A=PEEKC100>-24 

FT 93* POKE S4Z79,A 

HM 94* PM-256*A 

TO 96* POKE 559,46 

UH 909 POKE 53277,5 

MM 97* POME 704,14 

¥U 9*0 FOR I^PK+512 TO Ptt+04* 

OR 990 POKE I f « 

EP 1*4* NEKT I 

MU 181* RESTORE 227* 

OT 1*2* FOR I~0 TO 3ft 

PH 1050 REAR A 

DK 104* POKE 1536+1, A 

FE 1090 MEMT I 

QC 1000 S^STICICC03 

MR 1074 K-K+CC5J 

YS 1O00 Y=Y+OCS3 

UZ 1090 Y = Y+IV<1«-CY*92J 

HM 1100 H=H+CM<453-CM>2041 

UU 1110 Z-USR<1S30,K>Y3 

KV 1120 REN 



CDFfiTF WFW CURSOR rtHfi HO U F II 



PRINT HHFI* CURSOR STOPS 



YE 113* IF SO 15 AMR FLAG=« THEN 1060 

CC 114* IF S<>!5 THEM FLA&^Bl? CHR$C12Sl . 
POKE 77,*! REM 



l)N I UBSnBS FIRST MGUE 



CLE^R ri-.XT rtMD D I ^06L E dTTRACT Wfibf. 



KJ 1150 IF FLAG-l THEN 186* 

HA lib* FLAG- (5=151 

RO 1170 IF FLAG-* THEN 1*6* 

FJ 11B8 POKE 050,019 "Sunplot "JGMTS;" hO 

UPS GHT Ufl "jRAYi" '"JMON*:" ».; YEAR 

£0 1190 LAT=:IHTCCF- CY 13>*E3+B,5> 

EJ 1200 L"IMT£Ci70*S75-IM-453*2.2S)+B.SJ 

KA 121fl ? "UHRER CUftbOH LUNG "JARSCL3 

CH 1220 IF L<* THEN ? "t M J JfiOTO 1240 

MY 123* ? "fcF p ; 

MM 1240 7 " LAT ";ARSt|,ATl; 

AS 125* IF LAT CO THEN ? "5" ! &OTO 12 70 



Page £ - issue 37 1 7 



sunplotter 



^nri^f A s*t 



UF ±250 ? p, N" 

an i27fl ? -iiKdi tiMt- 

GMT" 
VH 1Z88 IF L<8 THEN ? "GHT plus aa ;:GOTQ I 

GB ±298 ? "GMT Minus ", 

TR 1388 7 lHTC&^ + fleS<t>/153 J SPOKE 657,19 

GJ 1310 L0H~TAItDE€*5IN<LAT 1/CQ-5CLAT1 

HF 1328 IF L0H>1 THEH ? "^un abd-J* horiZO 

n**i sgoto io&e 

FU 1338 IF LO*<-i THEH ? "5un below hariz 

OH 1 '; 2GOTD i860 

EM 1348 LON--ATH CLOH/SQR t"LOH*L0N+in + 90 

f>ti 1356 SA=CL/15J + CL.6tf/l l 5) 

VZ 1368 Sf4=Sff:GD5UB 1418 

UF 1370 ST=CU/15J-CLIHt^lSy 

ZZ 13S8 SH^ftGOSUB 1418 

QU 1396 GOTO I860 

HU 1488 HEN fitil : LU J ■■Jpyffrt^Mri J«« If -IM !!■] 1 1 »H 

KE £418 IF 5M<8 THEH 5H=5N+24 

HI 1428 IF 5H>24 THCH 5M=SM-24 

ZK 1438 U-INTCSKa 

HK 1446 M=HtTC(SH-IHT£SMJJ*68 + e.5J 

D<* 1456 IF M>59 THCM H-U+±:H=«J 

KY 1468 IF W<18 THEH ? M 6 M , 

ifl 1478 ? H; 

MS 1488 IF H<18 THEH ? "ft 1 *; 

JD 14*8 7 Hi" *'J 

fl.J 1S08 BETURH 

do isie rem r? Fl -l j I Jfcii'wrn rfn 

IZ 1528 DATA 1 , 3 . £ , 26 . 2 , 7 , 1 , 3 , 1 , 2 , 5 , $ . I , * 

J 4,7 J 5 J 5 i 12,4>i l 4,3, 62 
DT 15 3 DATA 2 F i r 3 r 35,l l 2,l J J;l J 2,6,5,fl,4 

,11,4, 2,4,1,63,5 
fiP 1548 DATA 1,3,17,1,7,1,4,2,1,1,1, 3*4*5 

,5, 9,1 * 12, 5,1 P 78 
KE> 1558 DATA 6,23,1,^,6,3,2,2,6,4*14,1,5, 

6,2,5,1,54, 1,7,8 
KG 1568 DATA 6, 1, 1, 1, 23 ,7,5,9,2, Z1,6,Z,4, 

1,55,3,4,11 
OM 1578 PAT A 4,6,26,7,5,1,1,30,6,5,54,1,1 

,3,1 
(IT 1588 DATA 17,2,6,14,1,4,7,7,24,2,4,1,1 

j- 3 , 3 , 52 , S , 2 
OJ 1698 DAfA 155,2,11,21,4,7,24,2,5,1,1,1, 

2,53,8,3 
PU 1666 DATA 26,14,2,7*l*l0*Xl*l,l,2,4,l, 

2,1,1,39,1,13,8,2 
UU 1&18 DATA 31,13,1,7,1, 11, 1* , 2, 1,3, 1,46 

,1,15,8,1,6,1 
V6 1*28 DATA 25,21,1,2,1,6,1,1,19,1,2,3*1 

,62*6,1 
MX 1538 DATA 33,14,1,12,3,3,22,64,1,1 
OH 1648 DATA 46,15,2,9,3,3,21,64,1,1 
JS 1658 DATA 41,27,1,1,25,14,2,1*1*4,3*3, 

1*5*1, ZB 
ftS 1668 DATA 43, 16, 1, 1, 2 , 8, 26 , 7, 1,6*4,4, 2 

*3t, 2,33, 2, 2 
HO 1678 DATA 48,16,1,7,27,6*3*1,2,4,6,3,2 

, 3-D ,3,3 
JB 1668 DATA 48, 5, 1 , 16 P 26 ,5 , 3 , 1 , Z , Z , 1 , 3 , 1 

,4,1,4,2,38,1,3 
UM 1698 DATA 47, 22 , 29, 4 , 1 , 1 , 2 , 1 , 2 , 1 , 1 , 2 * 1 

,10,2,29,1*1,1,1,6,2 
TD 1788 DATA 41, 22, 26, 1 ,« , 4 ,6 , 2 , 2 , 1 , 1 * 10, 

2 r 29,3, 2,4,1 
HK 1718 DATA 43,3,1,17,38,2,2,4,5,1,1,3,1 

p 7, 1,38,2,2,3,2 
TH 1728 DATA 43, 21, 38*1 , 1,6, 6, 1, 2*1*1*38, 

2*2,1,4 
GU 1738 DATA 45, 17*31*9, 11,38,4* 2 
YQ 1748 DATA 48,1,1,16,2,2,31,26,1,32 
*I 1758 DATA 54, 1,1,10, Z, 2, 3± # 26, 1,32 



fttt 1760 DATA 55, 1*1,6, 7,1, 27* 1*1, 21*1* 8,1 

,31 

HK 1778 DATA 56,1,1,5,7,1,28,22,1,6,3,25 

AT 17B8 DAIA 5>b , 1 , 1 , 5 , 36 , 23 , 1 , 6 , 1, 1 , 5 * 23 , 

14 

VD 17-98 DATA Sfl , 4 , 6 , 2 , 27 , ZZ , 1 , 1 , 2 . 8 > 5 , 28 , 

2,1 

VH 1988 DAIA 36,1,22,4,8,1,26,24,1,9,5,8, 

2,9 

TG iAlfl DATA 41,1,21,5,2.1,7,2,22,25,1,8, 

6,6,4,6 

BT 1B28 DATA *7 , 6 , 4 . 1, 26 , Z5 , Z , 6 , 8 , 4 , 5 ,6 ,5 

p * 
VLJ 1538 DATA 64,4,29,26,1,4,18,3,8,5*4,1 
TH 1846 DATA 66 , 3 , 25 , 14 P 1, 14 , 12 , 3 , 8 ,5*4 , Z 
ZG 1858 DATA 66, 2 x 5, 2 , 23 , 26 , 2 ,2*11, 2*8, 1> 

1,3,5,2 
ST 1868 DATA 66,1,3,2,1,4,28,38,11,2,8,1, 

2*1*7,1 
LG 1878 DATA 67, 11, 28, 26 , 14 , 1 , 7 , 1 , 5 , 3 
UY 1888 DATA 69,^*6,26,14,1,9,1,6,1,2*1 
IK 1898 DATA 78, 11, 19, 1 , 5 , 19 ,,Z1 , 2 , 1 P 1 , 6 , 1 
YP 1988 DATA 73,12,26,17,22,1,1*1,6,2 
OH 1*16 DATA 72,13,26,16,24,3,2,4,4*1 
JZ 1926 DATA 67,13, * 5, 18,1 ,4,25,2, 3*4* 1, 2 

*1*1 
MR 1938 DATA 61,1, 4,13*1,Z,Z4 * IB, 1,4, 26, 2 

,2.3*1,2*3,3 
HI 1948 DATA 63,19*21,14,2 7,3,1,3,1,2,1*2 

,1*4 
KP 1958 DATA 61,28,21,13,28,1,6,2,5,5*3*1 
UP 1968 DATA 55,21,28,13,29,4,11,4,1,1,1, 

1 
DG 1976 DATA 54,21,28,13,31,8,4,3,1,2,3,1 
TD 1988 DATA 54,19,21,13,35,1,1,1,10,1,4, 

1 
81 1990 DATA 53,19,22,12,48,2 
BD 2888 DATA 5S , 17 , 22 , 13 , 4 , 1 , 36 , 2 * Z, 1 
A6 2810 DATA 62,17,22,13,3,1,34,1,1,3*2*2 
BG 2828 DATA 62,2,1,13,22,13,2,2,33*5,2,2 

*10, 1,3,1 
DT 2030 DATA 48, 15, 22, 12, 2, 2, 32 , B, 1, 3,13, 

1 
DJ 2040 DATA 49,14*Z3,10,4,Z,£Z,1Z 
LA 2050 DATA 63,13,24,5*1,4*3,2,31,15,6,1 
DF 2868 DATA 55,13,24,18,3,2,38,17 
FB 2876 DATA 61,11,26,9,4,2,39,18 
IP 2888 DATA 68,10*27,9,35,18 
DT 2090 DATA 68,16,28,7,37,18,1,7 
HU 2188 DATA 60,16*28,7,37,18 
YD 2118 DATA 68,9,30,6,38,16,1,7 
HZ 2128 DATA 60*8,31,4,48,4,4*8 
Vf 2130 DATA 66, 9, 31, ! ,42, 3, 6, 8 
GZ 2148 DATA 68*7,66,6,18,1 
HL Z158 DATA 56,7,87,5,11,1 
WC 2168 DATA 49*7,183,2 
UH 2178 DATA 48,5*105,1 
EY 2186 DATA 48,5,93,2,18,1 
TY 2198 DATA 49,5,93,1,9,2 
EtV 2 288 DATA 58,4,164,2 
HR 2210 DATA 50,4,156,4,59,1 
EZ 2228 DATA 96,3.157,3,3,2,152,3 
PM 2238 DATA 158,4,12,1,628*1,1,1,265 
HZ 2Z48 REM IliVJA* WMIMU^J llki 
Kft 2256 DATA 8, 8, 8, 8, 8 r 0, 8, 8, 8, 8 , 1 , 1 , 1 + - t 
, 1, 8, 8, 8 , ~ 1 * 1 , — 1 , — I, ~lj 8, 8*0,0, 1,8, ~ 1 , 

8,0 



CH 2268 REM ! pTjII a» Ai] MH 1 1 :l1i] :1 

UL 2270 DATA 164,104,104,141,8,208,104,18 

4,168,162*0,109,24,6,153,0,136,232,200 

,ZZ4, 7, Z88, 244*96 
ZG 2268 REM hill=MWlT^H3 M J d 
M0 2298 DATA 8, 16 r 46,66, 48,16, ft 






ZH Pag« 6 - Issue 37 



DISK BONUS 



UNDER STARTERS 

ORDERS 

The Atari Racetrack 
by Barry Challis 

A great horse racing program for up to four players 



Under Starlets Orders is a flat rac- 
ing game covering 34 meetings 
with seven races per meeting. At 
the start of the game all horses 
hove an equal chance of winning 
at a starting price of 5/1 but after 
the first meeting, the starting price 
reflects the horses performance in 
previous races. Alternatively you 
have the option to treate form at 
the start of each game. 



There are extensive features in the 
game including 




Computer betting for 1-4 players 

Full colour animated race graphics 

Save game facility 

Multiple betting 

34 Flat meetings at all the major courses 

7 races per meeting 

1/2/3 form shown for current distances 

Joystick controlled 

Home betting alternative 

Print your own betting slips 

Name your own horses 

Photo finish 



PLAYING THE GAME 

Boot up with the disk which will automatically run the program. 
Leave the disk in your drive when playing the game and be sure 
to remove any write protect tabs if you wont to save games (it 
is best to make a copy of the full program onto another disk). 
When the opening options screen appears use the START key to 
select COMPUTER BET ON or OFF and then press the Atc button. 
If you select COMP BET then you will he asked how many 
players (up la 4) r Use a joystick in port 1 to select the type of 
bet from Single, Double or Treble by moving Ehe stick right or 
left. Press the trigger to select. Next move the joystick left or right 
to select the amount you wish to bet. Pressing the Are button 
registers your bet but if yau want to bet the course maximum 
of 25 fust leave the amount on and press the trigger. 

Next use the joystick up or down to choose your horse for the 
first race The previous wins of each horse are shown to the right 
of the horses name and as you move the Joystick the second and 
third places of the highlighted horse are shown, When ail players have 
entered their bets, the race begins. 



If you did not select COMP.BET 
the computer will print the run- 
ners as usual but will run up and 
down the field automatically 
showing each runners form. When 
you are ready to race press the fire 
button. 

FULLV ANIMATED GRAPHICS 

The race proper will show five 
hordes from top to bottom with the 
names of each and the bets placed 
at the lop of the screen. In the top 
right hand corner of the race 
screen the letters CF will show a 
computer form analysis and tips 
who should win the race. Study of 
this will give some Indication of form and how it affects horses 
and will also take into account other factors unknown to the 
punter Unfortunately favourites don't always winE The other 
label TOST shows the distance left to the finishing post. 

SAVE GAME INSTRUCTIONS 

The option of saving your current game is offered at the end 
of every meeting. Up to four games can be saved on the game 
disk and the current horse database is saved automatically when 
you save a game. 

EDITOR INSTRUCTIONS 

The program has 8 horse databases on disk of which 4 are user 
definable and there are 708 horses in total! It is possible to alter 
the details of each horse on the redeflnable databases and save 
these changes to disk. Just press SELECT on the main title page 
for the Editor. There are 78 horses in each database and on 
selecting the Editor you will be asked which horse you wish to 
edit, just enter the number and type the new name. Use the 
arrow keys (without the CONTROL key) to choose the colour of 
that horse. You can change all of the horses if you wish or just 
a few. Return will allow you to exit the editor. 

That's about it. Play Under Starters Orders with a few friends 
and we guarantee that it will having you leaping about and 
cheering as your horse crosses the line! This is one of the best 
multiple player games we have ever featured in Page 6 (it is also 
playable by 1 player) and will give you hours of play, Every once 
in a while a gem comes along [ 



Under Starters Orders Is the bonus on this issue's 
disk and Disk subscribers will have received their 
copy with the magazine- The disk aha contains all 
of the other programs from this issue ready to run 
and it may be purchased individually for just 
£2.95. Send your cheque or Postal Order to PAGE 
6, P.O. Box 54, Stafford, ST16 1DR. Overseas read- 
ers should add 50p to cover postage* 



Page 6 - Issue 37 29 



XL/XETYPE-IN 



AMA 




E 



xcephorous II is one of those cute little fellows that seem lo 
live only in computer games and have nothl ng more excit- 
ing to do with their lives than go around collecting di- 
amonds, nobody really knows why, it just seems to be the 
only worthwhile thing to do when you are buried under- 
ground in a maze that seems to have no way out. Imagine 
spending your whok life just collecting diamonds, must 
take a great deal of patience but l hen your life could just 
as easily be over in a flash, quite literally in this particular 
underground domain, which is full of little bolts of light- 
ning in all the passages. 

You can help Excephorous 11 prolong his life and succeed 
in his quest to collect more diamonds than any other 
underground fellow has ever done. All you have to do is 
move our little friend from I he bottom right of the screen 
to the top left, but the further you go the harder it will be 
to avoid those bolts of lightning. Those lightning bolts use 
up the oxygen in the underground caverns so you only 
have a certain amount of time to find the exit and a rising 
warning alarm only adds to the tension. It can get rather 
fraught at times. 

You need just a joystick and calm nerves to play AMAZ- 
ING! Just type in the listing, using TYPO 3 as you go r and 
SAVE a copy to disk of CSAVE to tape. Run the program 
and away you go. 

looks easy. ZZZapp! Oh well, back to the beginning. 




5C0RE-450 LIUE532'- 1 
TIME=©7 



l—L 



by Trevor Prendergast 



FI 
HC 
KS 
FI 
*H 
KC 
MU 



ftErf H WMWMH H KMMHHH H- MH - HHMHH ) fMMM*HWJ * H 



HEM * 

REM * 

REM * 

REM * 

REM * 

REM * 



AMAZING! 

for ATARI HIV HE 

by 

Trevor Prendergast 



it 



„-„„ . — — * 

PAGE 6 MAGAZINE - ENGLAND * 

NN S REM 

HA 3 POKE 559,8:50500 lBOOB : POKE 559,34:G 

010 bUOO 
KA 10 GRAPHIC* 17:DL~PEEK t560S+PE£KC561J* 

250; POKE DL+Z6, 1 15 :P0KE DL+Z7,l35 
UT 15 FOH tf-9 TO 3 I SOUND K , P , 8 : NEXT K 
EM ZB POKE 71B,33lP0Kt / 1. 1 , 255 : POKE 28,0! 

POKE 75G,CHB/Z56;frIA~0 
LU Z2 COSUB SCREEN 
EU 24 POSITION 7,21:? Hh ? SC j 
KN 26 POSITION 16,21:? ttfcjLJ 
IH 30 If PE£KC2B1>15B THEN POKE J§70*,0 
VA 35 IF PEEKC281 <150 THE* POKE N7B4 f 143 
KV 40 SETCGLOH B , PEE* C20) , 15 
All 45 IF MK-B AMD MV-1 AMP DIA=DIAMAH THE 

N GOSlf© 23*0! GOTO 14 
UT 58 J0Y=PEEK<632> 
GM B5 IF JOV=Al THEN GOSUB 500 
ED GO IF JOY-7 THEN GOSUB S2B 
LH 65 IF J0Y=14 THEH GOSUB 540 
HC 7B IF JOY=13 THEH GOSUB 500 
5 J 8 IF TXHE<9 THEN POSITION I1,2Z:7 ttO J 

"B'MNlrtTIMIEJ ! GOTO 35 
gj 62 POSITION iJ.,22:? tt&lINTCTIMEJ 
M5 *5 TIHE=TIrte-fl. B2 
ftt IBB IF TXHE<=0 THEN £GT0 £50B 
IE 118 SOUND 2 J TIME*1B J 10 J 15 1 SOUIID 3,CTItt 

E«fl83 +1,10,15 
PZ 4BO GOTO 38 
RA ^00 LOCATE MH-1,MV,C 

UN 502 IF C=32 OR C=43 OR CG = iO AW> PEEK! 
7B*J=8J THEH POSITION MK-ljMV^? «6 J "SI" 

^position rm.Hv:? uer 1 "shh^kk-i 

GO 504 IF C-43 THEM GOSUB BBB : ftETURW 

GH 586 IF C~18 AND P£EK*7e^>B THEN G05UB 

?8B ; POP :goto ib 

TO SOB IF C=32 THEN RETURN 
Z5 515 RETURN 

OV 528 TRAP 53BIL0CATE KK + l.HY.C 
IN S22 IF C = 3Z OR C = 45 OR CC = 10 AND PEEK C 
?8*J "OS THEM POSITION MN+l.MY;? B6l"ll" 
JSPOSITION MM,M¥l? »6l" " i HK=MH+1 
GH 524 IF C=4S THEN GOSUB BB3 ! RETUR* 
Vm 52fc IF C = lfl AND PEEKCN7B*J>9 THEN GOSU 

B 300; pop :goto 10 






30 



Page 6 Issue 37 



AMA ING! 



HA 

Yft 



OL 
GP 

ZL 
KH 

LG 



Git 

GU 

» 

ce 
yp 

p* 

so 

VH 
£0 
III 
JH 
GU 

EF 
FP 

rc 

KH 

RN 
HU 

tin 

MI 

OF 

HZ 

OY 

hf 

WU 
TT 
PR 
KE 
AK 
Fl 
Zl 
IV 
IIS 
MV 
PC 
fi 
JH 
CY 
MM 
JT 
KH 
IL 
CK 
HH 
PI 
AM 
KK 
CE 
Ctt 
YU 
OD 
TT 



53* RETtfRH 

548 LOCATE MK J MY-i,C 

542 If C-32 OR C-43 Oft CG = IB AMP PEEtif 

7fl?3-6> THEM POSITION HK,HY-1;? KG^-fl" 

;: POSITION MK.MYJ? ttb j " P, ;HY = HY 1 

$44 IF C=43 THEM GOSUB BB8 S RETURN 

946 IP C = I8 AMD fȣEK(7e?J>e THEM GO SUB 

98ft: POP :gotd 10 
55ft RETURN 

56ft LOCATE HK,MY+1,D 

57B IF C=3Z OR C-43 Oft CC = 18 AMD PEEK t 
709)-B» THEM POSITION HX,HY+l*t »B;"M» 
is POSITION HX,HY:? t*6?" **:HY = liY+l 
574 IT C-43 THEN COSUB 000: RETURN 
576 IF C = IO AMD PEEtit?0?)>O THEM &05U0 

908; POP :GOTO 18 
588 ftETURN 

885 FOft M=7 TO 8 STEP "1 

ft 18 FOR Z-H^Z TO H*5 

828 50UNO 1, Z ,10, lb r SOUND t M Z+H,2, 10 ( H 

EKT ZSMEMT X 

830 SOUND l^rOjBlSOEINO 2 , B> ft,, fl I SC = 5C+ 

50? POSITION 7,21:? IttjSC 

040 OIA-BIA+1 

fl&8 ftETURN 

980 HEM MJ^^|i||f Bfflil^^^^B 

90S FOII H"B TO 255 STEP 3 

910 ^OUHD B, 14,4,15! SOUND 1 , K , 8 w 15 ; POKE 

712, H/t: POKE 718 J K:NEMT H 
915 SOUND 0,0,8,8 SOUND 1,B>B,B 
920 LI=LI-1!IF LI=# THEN 500O 
925 POSITION 10 3 21:* ttfijjLI 
930 POKE 7 12, 01 POKE 710, 39 : ftETURN 
999 GOTO 38 

1885 ? KOJ+ 1 Q k f 

lBie ? mb;"D B 

1015 * S6j*H 

WO;" 

«ft: 
ao?" 

Hfij'U fl k D HB n D ff'j 
«6;"B B D U k k fl fl": 

n*r*u b mm a tmum o»f 

» 6 j"B fl fl fl m k IT 1 ; 



1BZB ? 
1B25 7 
183B ? 
1B35 ? 
1048 ? 
1045 ? 
1B5B 7 
1855 ? 
1008 ? 
1B65 ? 
1B7B ? 
1B75 
1076 
1077 
1B7B 
1BB8 
188 5 
1B9B 
1895 
1890 




»6;"B 

ttttl'l 

*o;"D 



fl k B 



n a k it; 

D DB fl fl B fl V; 

B k +B B B B fl B"s 

Q k B fl D II II H"; 

B IBB B D D fl"; 

Ok B m "3 

•flSCOftE- LIVES= B"J 

*B TIHE = ir-; 



1097 POSITION 10,19s? ttGi'fit'J 
189B HH"10;NY=19:TIME=15?ftlAMnX= 
1099 RETURN 

7 jK>i|||||||||||||||||ur 
a*;" fl k B k * k 0" 



1IB8 
1185 
111B 
1115 
1128 
1125 
1170 
1135 
1140 



k + k 

umn 

B k + k 



n k B 

**?•« ddb 

KOj '« B B a 

t*GJ"fl B fl fl fl lUIHUH"; 

BOfH D B H D D k O"; 

trtr-fl + B k B k SB"; 

ttSrWNnHHmmB fl"; 
«6;-s k k k k k k fl"; 









JY 


1X4% ? m>;"fl iu 


INHHMMHI O": 


HI 


1150 ? B6j la B B 




JI 


1155 ? Hbi-H B 


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JF 


lifio f tJ5;"fl B 


on am n n* 1 ? 



HD 1100 

AC 1178 

AY 1175 

YO HBO 

da noa 

OZ 1104 
HE 1100 
KA 1168 
DA 11^0 
HC 1192: 
JN 1194 
KY 1197 
Jli 1190 
CM 1199 
HY 1280 
YD 1305 
GH 1218 
GH 1215 
RD 1228 
MP 1225 
BZ 123« 
HH 1235 
MU 124B 
IL 1245 
IN 125B 
M5 1255 
MX 1200 
RZ 1205 
NJ 1270 
CJ 1275 
SU 1200 

gp izez 

YU 1284 
TN 1280 
MC 12ft 8 
DC 1298 
ME 1292 
JP 1294 
KH 1£90 
KH 1297 
CO 1299 
IC 1300 
IU 1385 
NA 131ft 
GU 1315 
JF 13Z8 
IT 1325 
LO 1330 
OJ 1335 
HZ 1340 
HE 1345 
IH 1350 
GH 1355 
KT 1300 
PO 1302 
5H 1504 
OO 1360 
GC 1300 
KV 1378 
KG 1375 
DB 1300 
FZ 1382 
JO 1504 
DZ 13B6 
HO 1388 
JB 139B 
KI 1392 



aB;"||5CORE- 
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f BBJ'fi TIME" It' J 

? Ms mnunananiiiiiiii"; 

POSITION 18 j, If if SH; 4i y fll ; 

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REM 

? no;-* u+fl h B"j 

t m$*m a mm+u n b b-; 

7 »6^n fl g k III B fl B* r ; 

? «*j"B k D B II k B I]"; 

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» no; 'IB D B k+U k 
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? »5j a H fl+fl Ik H II IB 
7 «B;-fl B flB B HI B+B 

t itei'fl fl +b n a a 

? wb;"H fl fl flfl k 0+ B 



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? Bfo;»|J^C0RE- LIVE 5= IT 

? tttr"fl TItC= fl 1 

t *** . ^■■■■■■■^^^^■■■■■■— ■ 

position ift, 19:? OB;"*-; 



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Page 6 - line 37 31 



AMAZING! 



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tt6; J U+^ B k 

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tte? 1 B B+B B fl 

tt6;"B B fl B fl 

nsi-'flBBD B 

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kg; "ft B B fl B 

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ttb ; » ■«■■■■■■■■*■■■■■«*■ ■ 

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B fltfl 8 H ,p ; 
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141* ? 

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1420 ? 

1425 ? 

143* ? 

1435 ? 

1440 7 

1445 7 

1450 ? 
5M 1455 ? 
AG 146& ? 

14G5 7 

147* ? 

14 ra ? 

1476 7 

1477 ? 
1476 ? 
148* ? 
1485 ? 
14*5 ? 
1487 7 
145* ? 
1492 POSITION 10,19!? t*5;**a M J 

Mtt 1434 HH = 18:ftY = 19lTtME-28:DlAt1AK = 21 
CS 149* RETURN 

ISA* GRAPHICS IB! POME 756 , CH6S256 I POKE 
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157* NEKT K 
1568 FOR H = 2 TO 18 
15B5 P05ITICIH 16,*!? t**j" II" 
158 O POSITION 1«,H-1E? ***J" " 
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2**8 FOR H=l* TO 4 STEP ~1 

2898 POSITION 4,H;7 tt6;A$ 
LP 2188 POSITION 4,H+lS? **&J M 
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|_T 212* FOR C=* TO ZOlNEHT C 
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T CMlHEKT K 
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YM 2M0 SOUND 1,0,0,0 2 FOR GH-fl TO 5*0:NEH 

T GUI RETURN 
VP* 2568 FOR K-8 TO 254 
KZ 2SD5 SOUND 2, X , 1*, 15 : SOUND 3,M^l,i&,15 

LM 251* NEKT H ^^ 

JW 2528 POSITION 4,12:? EG J M GM3 0B tHIH^ : 

POKE 711 * PEEK C20) 
EH 2550 FOR GH™* TO SOfliPOKE 711, PEEK t201 

;NEHT Ctt:LI=LT-l:IF LI<1 THEM 588* 
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fNEKT CM 
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1«250!POK£ 700,^75 SPOKE 7*9,15;P0KE 71 
8,255 
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AO 6815 POSITION 5,2:? H6; "AWflZlNG ! " 
ZU 6820 POSITION 8,41? «6 ; "by" 
HC 5825 POSITION 1,6ft* «6 1 1 lH3g;JiB JjM tH3H 
^HaB" 

SV 5*30 POSITION 4,^7 Wf> ! ' (3H^ atlHJ M 

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ft: KENT D I NEHT H 
JE 18*5* N711^71l!N789=7*9:LI=3iSC=8:LEV" 

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£P 18865 DATA 223,223,223,0,251,251,251,8 
LV 18878 DATA 68, 126, 219, 255, 195, 126, **, i 

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DH 1*075 DATA & , 15 , 32 , 16 j * , 16 , 32 F J.& 
HH 1*060 DATA 8, 24 ,&*, 126, 1^6, 68 r 24, 8 
MK 10*»* DATA 15* , 78 , ISO , 88 , 15* , 98 , 156 , 1* 
0,15*, 70,150, 00,15b, 90,156, 108,118, 12* 
, 138 T 140,150, I /fl j 250 
FV 1*168 DATA ISO , 25*. 198 , 25* , 208 , 250, ISO 
,25e,lO*,258>170 J 2SO,108,258 J l»*,258,2 

88,250 
lilJ lailO DATA ISO, 258, 1 Sifl , 250 , 78,288,^0,2 

OO,?*, 280, 100,280, 108, 288, 5*, 2*0, 68,28 

8 , 70 , 2*0 , B8 , 2** ? 98 , 288 » 10* 
MT 2*008 GOTO 20**0 ■ 



32 



Page it - Issue 37 



i 



WANNA 
JOB? 

(for a couple of weeks) 



We are so far behind in going through all the 
programs submitted for publication that we need 
someone to help us out for a couple of weeks* If 
you are interested then you need to be fully con- 
versant with the XL/XE (with some understanding 
of the ST if possible) and be able to program quite 
well in BASIC. You need to be extremely quick at 
picking things up and very meticulous In your 
work. You also need to he able to work on your 
own without supervision. 

The job is only temporary, a couple of weeks at 
most, remuneration will be modest (to say the 
least!) but we will pay travel and accommodation 
expenses while you are here. The job will only suit 
someone who is totally addicted to the Atari, 
maybe as a temporary job during University or 
College holidays, and although it may be fun it 
will also he hard work! 

If you ate interested (you must be over 16) please 
drop me a tine or give me a ring* Write to Les 
EHJnghaiu, PAGE 6 ATARI USER, P.O. Box 54, 
Stafford, STI6 1DIL TeL 078S 213928 



TAPES DISCS 
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Page 6 - Issue 37 33 






TUTORIAL SUBROUTINES 



CREATING 
A DATABASE 



In this article and subsequent articles I am going to change 
the format of the Tutorial Subroutines a bit and. Instead of 
providing individual subroutines with detailed analysis., I 
am going to work up a program in stages. My aim is to write a 
name and address database for cassette tape users. The idea 
came from a reader in Brighton who wrote to me to ask if I knew 
of such a program. At first I thought it would be easy to advise 
him of one of the programs T had used in the past, but when I 
went .searching 1 found that they were all disk bused (as are the 
majori ly of 'serious.' programs for the Atari 8-hLt range). 
I would have liked to fully develop this program in advance as it 
is easier to appear slickly knowledgable when describing and 
documenting a completed program, but I have not had time for 
that and so I will have to be strictly honest and develop the 
program as 1 go. In order to leave plenty of memory for the data 
itself the program will have to be straightforward and fairly short 
so [ will write it specifically for the address book function rather 
than try to develop a general database program to do the job. Jt 
Is always more difficult to write a program which is general and 
takes account of many varied uses than to write for a specific 
application hut having said that I will ensure lhal the program 
is documented well enough for you to customise il for other 
applications without too much difficulty. 

DATA BASE FUNCTIONS 

The first thing that is needed before a start is made on actually 
writing a program is to decide in detail what we want it to do. 
For our address database 1 will include the following functions; 



Creating a database 

Loading a data set 

Deletiny records from the 

database 

Printing a record or records 

Sorting the data 



Saving a data set 
Adding records to the 

database 

Updating (making changes 

to) the data 

Quit the program 



For the time being I have treated each of these functions as 

being separate, but as we develop the program they will prob- 
ably fall into groups; for example loading and saving data will 
probably have quite a lot in common. Also there are other 
possible functions that could be included, and which I may add 
when we have a better idea of the size of the program and 
whether there Is enough memory. An example is the ability to 
tag a record or group of records to print or save as a separate set. 

FLOW CHART 

It is important to establish a first Idea of how the different parts 
of the program will interact, this may well change when the 
program is more developed,, but if there is no guideline to work 
to from the start it is easy to get tied up in detail and it becomes 
difficult to find a way through the whole program. Before start- 
ing the main part of the program there will be a need to 
initialise variables etc. and to provide some instructions for the 
first time user. Initialisation can include a title screen, and it 
would be nice to have a set of instructions that can be deleted 

34 Page 6- issue 37 



Ian Finlayson shows you how 

to put together several I 

subroutines with a database 

program specifically for 

cassette users 



from the program when they arc no longer 'needed as this wLll 
release a bit of memory for data. Still I am getting ahead of 

myself - the instruction* will not be written until last as we will 
need to know how the program works before writing instructions 
for others! 

Having decided earlier what functions are to be included in the 
program it is necessary to look at the way they will Interact. For 
this database program each function can be considered to be 
independent and it will be quite easy to link them through a 
main menu. From the main menu the program will branch out 
to any selected functions and when that is complete loop back to 
the main menu again; the exception to this is the quit function 
which will terminate the program - 

The easiest way to visualise the interrelation of the various 
modules within a program is to draw them out in a How chart. 
This ensures that you know where you are all the time and 
where conditional branches go. 1 have drawn up a flow chart of 
the prime functions of this program which can he seen in the 
figure. 

THE PROGRAM 

The actual program part of this issue's tutorial does nothing 
more than provide a framework for the modules to fit in. It will 
run and does prove the flow of the program as a whole. 

Li tie v 10-30 - I have started by defining a whole series of line 

numbers, this will help to keep the program readable. It is- much 
easier to understand GOSUB SORT' than GOSUB 3000 - in the 
latter case it is necessary to scan the listing to find what the 
subroutine does. You will see that the lines are spaced 1000 uparL 
to leave plenty of space for the program lines that have to go in 
between. 

Lines 40^50 - These lines call the initialisation and instructions 
subroutines. The subroutines themselves will be in a later article 
but I have put a little conditional branch in the instructions 
subroutine to try it out. 

Line 999 - is a REM statement banner for the Main Menu. 1 will 
put one of these in before any major program block and will 
ensure they are on the line before the start of the routine. This 
allows all the REM statements to be deleted at a later date to 
release additional memory without changing the program flow- 
tit Is bad practise to GOTO or GOSUB to a REM statement). These 
banners make the program much more readable and help dur- 
ing program development, but do not affect its operation. 
Lines 1000-1 100 - These lines print the main menu screen - it is 
not an exotic or flashy screen but will serve the purpose. 
Line 1110 calls the Keypress subroutine. This is a general 
purpose subroutine which detects a key being pressed and re- 
turns the value of the key in variable KEY. In this case we expect 
a number between 1 and 9 {key rodes 49 and 58) and if a wrong 



HO 
AA 
U|_ 
KT 
CH 
55 
KD 
MM 
HO 



REM HMKKH H WMMMMMMHWKMH H MKrttthM H HKWB 

ttt'H m TLilORIftL SUBROUTINE * 

HEM * AP!>RESS BOOK * 

REH * bSP 4f 

HEM » Ian Finlfly^n * 

REM * — — — — * 

REM * FACE 6 MAGAZINE - ENGLAND * 

REM HWWUMMWMK W MWMMW WMMM t CKWMMK W M t C W W 
REM 



hh io QUiTmeoeo : tvpeit-500^ ; DBLOflD = seeo : 

DfiSfl^-7We ; RECA&ft=&OOB 1 RECDEL=5G88 ! UP 

frATE-488« 
JU 20 SORT-3 O0B - CREftTE:=2088; MAIN MENU- iOOfl 

i KEY^RESS^EOSe 
01 3ft INSTRUCTIONS- LLflftH:. THE TlflLISE=12B08 

MCEYPftEss^iseeo 

E« 46 GOSUB INITIALISE 
ZA 50 GOSUB IHSTRUCTION^ 
331 REM 

: *$ 



O- CREATE NEK DATABASE" 
6K SORT DATABASE" 
11 B- UPDATE DATABASE" 
ii g- DELETE RECORDS" 
" @- ADD RECORDS" 
" @- 5AUE DATABASE* 1 
Q- LOAD DATABASE' 1 
@- PRINT OUT" 
" @^ OUIT" 
3? "SELECT A NUMBER" 
ill* G05UB KEYPRESS; IF KEY<4* OR KEV>5 
B THEM ? "NUMBER MUST BE !-*» ! GOTO III 
O 
FZ 1120 GOSUB <KEY-473#10Oe 
ZJ i??B GOTO MAINMENU 
RH 199? REM ^t^ tftTT^W J .11 iWJ lHW 

mu jteoe ? -cheats database" 

AE ZOB1 ? "PRESS A KEY TO CONTINUE"; GOSilB 

KEYPRESS: RETURN 
ZD Z??? REH WH fAiJilMJJrfilzliH jHHt 
JO 3088 ? "SOIIT RECORDS" 
Ar SOBl ? "PRE3S A KEY TO CONTINUE" s GOSOB 

KEYPRESS] RETURN 
IS $533 REM **-* g^T!J I IJifil ■]>» *** 
MS 4000 ? "EDIT RECORDS" 




key has been pressed a prompt is printed and the program loops 
back to the beginning of the line for another try. 
Line 1120 - This line causes the branching out into the various 
subroutines; when I is selected this line will GOSUB 2000 r 2 gives 
GOSUB 3000, 3 gives 4000 and so on. 

Line 1990 - When the program returns from the subroutine to 
line 1120 this line will loop back to the beginning of the Main 
Menu routine, this loop back will always occur until the Quit 
option is selected. 

Lines 1999-9001 - These lines set up the REM banners ahead of 
each subroutine followed by two lines of temporary program 
which, in each case, prints a short statement of which subroutine 
will go in the space and then calls for a keypress (any key will 
do) to take you back to the Main Menu- 
Lines 9999-10020 - Again this is a temporary subroutine, It 
prompts for u Yes/No answer to check you really meon to exit- 
Either T (89) or y (121) will END the program, any other key 
will return to the main menu. 

Lines 10030-12002 - This is the place for the Instruction and 
Initialisation subroutines. 

Lines 12FW and 13000 - This is the subroutine which checks 
for key presses. As it stands it is very simple and will not deal 
with the most obscure situations {such o$ if the inverse key has 
been accidentally or deliberately pressed). I will put a more 
comprehensive subroutine here later. Keyboard input was dealt 
with fairly thoroughly in one of my previous articles (Issue 31), 



A'. 


40&1 7 "PRESS A KEY TO CONTINUE" ? GOSUB 




KEYPRESS: RETURN 


MI 


49** REH *HH*flT« AM it Jrfn :l d»HH* 


HD 


5068 ? "DELETE RECORDS" 


AH 


5801 7 "PRESS A KEY TO CONTINUE" ; GOSUB 


RA 


KEYPRESS ! RETURN 


5«* REH ***f:VI«:H7i;m'l:l^ 


JP 


6008 7 "ADD RECORDS' 1 


AI 


6881 ? "PRESS A KEY TO CDNT INUE 1 ': GOSUB 




KEYPRESS : RETURN 


OP 


6994 REH 'Ml Ml M 1 II M 


VI 


70©0 f "SAUE DATA" 


AJ 


7081 ? "PRESS A KEY TO COHTINUE" ! GOSUB 




K E YPRES5 : RETURN 


EU 


7999 REM """MM'M M'T II 1 


RZ 


15600 ? "LOAD DATq" 


AK 


BB8A ? "PRESS A KEY TO CONTINUE" : GOSUB 


IK 


KEYPRESS: RETURN 


c» -a O a npu m yc wNRB ii "h J *fc. ^^Tl 1 1 k ^^kW-H-W- 


EH 


9888 ? "PRINT OUT" 


: AL 


3001 7 "PRESS A KEY TO CONTINUE" i GOSUB 




KEYPRESS 5 RETURN 


TF 


?77? REM ?HHf^^H]IQDiVMM*- M - >t 


GO 


18808 ? "Da YOU REALLY RANT TO OUIT? CY 




/HI" 


LV 


1WHUJ CiOSUB KEYPRESS 


JK 


leeze if key=05 or key^izi then ? "*"* 




EM 


DJ 
BH 


10838 RETUflH 


AB7V? REM JHrfiyMjldHlf tk A<H lUM M IC 


LJ 


11008 ? !? "DO YOU NEED INSTRUCTIONS? 




CY/N1" 


HA 


11010 GOSUB KEYPRESS 


GS 


11820 IF NOT CKEY=&9 OR KEYS121) THEM 




RETURN 


BA 


11838 f "INSTRUCTIONS FOLLOW HERE" 


DP 
HZ 


11048 RETURN 


119*9 ittM **H;il#f:14«iit«i]:i*tt* 


VZ 


12088 ? "INITIALISE" 


LS 


12001 ? "PRESS A KEY TO CONTINUE" S GOSH 




B KEYPRESS! RE TURN 


DL 

t.r; 


12002 RETURN 


x^t?? Htn ^~^H H "M ii"l nrirn n 


nj 


13008 OPEN Bl^O^'Ks'-JGET Itl , KEY J CLOS 




E HI!* S RETURN 



THE FLOWCHART 





That's all this time. If you type in the listing shown here it will 
run, and 1 will try and odd piece by piece in future articles in 
such a way that the whole will always run. If you want more 
information or wish to have a say in the content of future 
tutorials please write to Ian Tin lay son., at 60, Rounds Lone 
Crescent,, East Preston , West Sussex BN16 ILK} * 

Page h - l*<me 57 35 



XL/XETYPE-IN 




SCROLLY TEXT 



Over the years the scrolling message has become some- 
thing of an institution, maybe not so much on the Atari 
8-bit5 but certainly on the Commodore 64 and Atari ST. 
Games and especially demos feature scrolling texts which are 
sometimes token to extremes, just to prove a point. At the time of 
writing, the record length of a scroll is 41Kb in the ST 'B.I.G. 
demo' which takes over two hours to read! 
Until now Atari S-bit owners have had to miss oat on the 
delights of the infamous scrolling message but now all that will 
change for the Scrolly Text Editor will enable anyone to get 
famous with their very own message that can be passed on to 
thousands of other Atari users, 

A few weeks ago, having nothing belter to do, I fancied creating 
a scrolling message on my Atari but immediately hit upon the 
problem of how to enter the text into the computer. It turned out 
to be easier to write a program so the Scrolly Text Editor was 
born. It slowed down the creation of my message by over a week 
but once completed simplified the text entry no end. What's 
more there is now an scrolling message editor for the Atari .so 
that anyone can create their own messages. 
The Scrolly Text Editor is a machine code program that can be 
created by the BASIC listing shown. |ust type in the listing, 
checking it with TYPO 3 as you go and SAVE a copy to disk. Now 
insert a disk, with at least 40 free sectors into Drive 1 and RUN 
the listing. It lakes about a minute and a half to create the 
machine code file so go and boil yourself half an egg and when 
you come back you will find a file called SCROLL Y.OBJ on your 
disk, This file can be run by calling up DOS and using Option L 
on the DOS menu, 

CREATING YOUR MESSAGE 

Text is entered .simply by typing along the central scroll bar r as 
you would expect, but to avoid the 'Escape 1 keypresses needed for 
some of the special characters, the seven offender* have been 
moved to the 'Control-Number' positions, AH the CAPS modes 
are supported, a it hough the inverse key now affects every screen 
code enabling all 256 characters to be produced. The editing 
facilities have also been modified so that CTRL plus up/down 
arrows move the cursor to the start or end of the text respectively 
and the TAB and SHIFT/TAB keypresses move the cursor forward 
or back by ten spaces. One final point to note is that although 
the CTRL plus INSERT/DELETE functions work in the usual man- 
ner, the auto-repeat will slow down considerably at times, he- 
cause of the large amount of memory that has to be shifted in 
longer messages. This can be minimised by setting the repeal 
rate to 1 via the OPTION menu. 

1 he function keys produce a few effects worthy of mention. The 
START key enables or disables the smooth scroll facility so that 
you can gel some idea of spacing and of what the final scroll will 
look like, Pressing the SELECT key switches between the two 
different scroll routines available. If the BIG SCROLL is enabled r 
any successive scroll will use Graphics 2 instead of graphics 
and will also include a pretty nifty special effect to create a kind 
of shadow on the letters but because of the restrictions of this 



by Bryan Kennerley 



graphics mode, lowercase and inverse letters, will be displayed as 
different coloured uppercase characters, Control characters will 
give unpredictable results, so if you plan to use expanded text in 
your scroll you should select this option to check on the desired 

effect before saving the message. 

FURTHER OPTIONS 

The OPTION key will bring up a menu of further options and 

also exit back to the main editing screen. Here you can choose 
the option you want by using the up and down arrow keys and 
select that option with the RETURN key as instructed on the 
screen. You can modify the auto-repeat on the keys i.e the 
number of 50ths of a second before the repeat starts and the time 
between each successive repeat - this is similar to the effect of 
memory locations 729 and 730 on the XL/XE. The boot values of 
Basic are 40 and 5 which 1 find annoyingly slow. I personally 
prefer 12 and 2 which speeds things up considerably and have 
used these as the default in this program. If the bouncing lines in 
the header text on the main screen make your eyes ache you can 
disable them from this menu and, if you like music while you 
work, you can even switch the tape motor and key click on or off. 

LOAD AND SAVING MESSAGES 

The load and save options, once selected, bring up a filename 
window at the bottom of the screen which can be closed again by 

pressing the ESCAPE key. You need only enter the 8 character 
name of the file and not the device name or the extender - all 
files are saved to Drive 1 with a .TXT extension. If the cassette 
motor is on when you access the disk r it will be temporarily 
stopped during the process. Should you just want to erase the 
current message in memory just select either option and type 
WIPEME - don 't by to use that as a. filename! 

THE WORLD RECORD? 

From the main screen you may have noticed that you have 
27kb for your message, but if you load the editor without Basic, 
an extra 8Kb is freed giving a maximum of 35Kb. Not quite 
enough for the world record but, if you wanted to, you could 
always attempt the world record for an 8-bit machine which I 
have been told is 2 1Kb in a program for the Commodore 64. 
Whatever you write about in your message, you are bound to 
succumb to the temptation that has plagued the demo writer 
throughout history - the superfluous HELLO concept, I certainly 
have never seen a scroll without a greetings list so if you are 
going to follow this age old tradition, at least mention my name 
tin a good context please) since nobody has ever done this before 
(boo-hoo!) and you can always pad it out with sarky comments 
in brackets (and why not?), they can make a message more 
entertaining. In any case, it is always wise to remember that if 
you enjoy writing the message., it's a safe bet that people will 
enjoy reading it. 
Have funl 



■ 









36 Page 6 « Issue 37 



EDITOR 




MO 1 AE* 

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DL iB rF AS?! THEM ? "OPERATION JUCCEliriJ 

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HP 35 PORE 752,fllEMfr 
BY M flEH 
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15 



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HH 344 AATft 3B, 41,52*47, 6-B.B, 0,0.1. 4, t»tp 



continued overleaf 



SEND US YOUR SCROLLING MESSAGES! ... SEND US YOUR SCROLL 

Everybody tovey to read a strolling message no matter how bod it is and hem is your chance to become famous and have 
your very own scrolling message read by hundreds of other Atari owners. What's mare, when you send in your scroiting message 
well send you back a whale disk fiill of other people's interesting, unusual, inane or fust plain daft serattst 

Att you need to do is use the SCROLLY TEXT EDITOR to make up your own message, save it on 41 disk and send it into PAGE 
6, As soon as we have enough scrolling messages to make up a full disk we will send that disk to you in exchange for yours. 
You tan then spend hours marvelling at alt the crazy things that other Atari users want to say. 

What do you put into a stroll? Anything you like really. The big challenge of doing a really good scrolling message is to think 
up enough to say without repeating yourself or getting totally and utterly boring. Let your imagination run free and come up 
with a better scroti than anybody else! Write about anything, but please keep the language clean and keep away from naughty 
things! A lot of y&unger Atari users will be sending In their messages* 

Go to it! Send your disk (sorry we can't cope with cassettes) to J HE PAGE 6 SCROLL, P.O. Box 54, Stafford, ST16 1DR. You'll 
probably have to wait a few weeks for us to get enough scrolls to fill a disk bul as soon as we have enough, a disk will be 
on its way back to you. 



Page 6 - Issue 37 37 





SCROLLY TEXT 


















a,3^iJl r fi 4 i4 l H^3 r iei 1 ^( r llH J HH F li 






S.3-.7&. >6. 2 26, 173 






,13 3,127,100,126.6.169,0,174,132,6, 157 






4,146,141 




M 


654 DOTft lt,4.C P 740 J 6 P 2«6.1S4,ft. f* , 36 . J 






.34, ^00,173,156,6, 141.146 






HH J36 DATA IJl.U.iir 117, 163,117, MS. lift , 






9, 173,ll d f44, 261 p 7 j 240, 246 , 2 It 1 , 3 . 2-44 , I 




MB 


910 6ATA 6. 149. 6, 96,167.25c, 141,117,6, 






*.lr r .ZEp2*,24,e.6.e,ft.O.O,B,B,0 t *,fl,a, 






, 7B,Z47,3fl,174. |SI 






141 p 146 , fi , 96 . 1*5 . I 1 2 P 76 . 2 J 3 p 1 7 , 1 3 3 , ± 14 






* 




0¥ 


Oftft DATA fl,280,240 t 201 P S l ?44r 1/-.2B1.6. 






, 1 B3 ,113,23 3,0,133,115 






DP J60 DnlQ 4,U^,ft H B,4S, ]7 r 45 r 4J J ift.57 F fi 






24-4 r226,l/3,14 6 P B,ZOfl,S3i J 173 x l M . l> , 2 60 




IL 


726 DATA 166, *0, 1 77,114. 193!pl40, 35,130 






. Ti i . s l , :i / , 5 1. . z h . e , « , o r o r a , a , a , « . . h 






, 64 P 76, ?6. 226. 173 p 171 






, il P 24B , 173 , 146, , 206. 26, 169. 16, Z03 . 14 






Vr 3 70 DATA , lr , ..l , M . . o . q , <] . C . 8 r D , , « , 4 . (1 p » 




cu 


67B bATfe 1,73, 1,141. 171. 6. 32, 2^,42, 161 






4.6. 144 p 1 3 , 30 p Z 37 , 1 44 . 6 






,a r 6 I i,A 1 « J ^ 1 +4,4^,5fl,B7 1 fl 






.£0pl41, lE4 F 6,172 P t62,& F 153 r 34.20D. 1 ^3 




EH 


934 OAT* 166, 167, B,1S3,14B, 35, 135,16,2 






CK 366 DATA W.Xf^B^l.Zt.SJ^,*,*,*,!!, 






, l.-il , 6.2BB, 3,74 






50, 17 3,l*4.6,54.237pl44,Bpl41, 150,6,17 






e H i^ K a i e I i.| r |.| J « J i,e,e,B 




ttv 


664 ftATfl *4r'/20.1!,?, 0, 141, 131,6,1** ,13 






3pl41,6,Z37,146,6.246 






□M 3*6 frftffl 9^,0.6.6,(1,9.^,33,58,59,17, 






2 P fi, 169 P 1 P 14 1. 167,6.173,171,6,73,1^6, 




JH 


946 DATA 23,173,150,5, 201,21,176. 16,16 






4 5 , 5 2 , 4 , 4fl. , 4 /■ , E 1 , Z b . O , O , P i , 41 , ll , 6 






11 j 3B>173, 131,6 






9 . 74 , 56 . 2 1 7 , 1 90 , 6 , 1 70 , 1 5 B p 3 7,159,0, 153 






U5 46o data b,0,q,a, 0.4, 0,0,0, 8,6,6,0,0,0 




GC 


6*4 PAT A 2«B, 5, 7B j 164, 36 „ 169,0. 14 1,167 






, ±4fl, 36, 136, 26?, 16, 249 






,ft.l,lr«,o,e,s,i r is,JT,4t 






j 6. 1*1 ,131 r i ,141.132, 6p 173,17^6,264 ,3 




ez 


956 PAT 6 76,33, 35, 94,90, B0i97j 91 ill 4,1 






AY 416 Pdlu 31,0,44,47,35,43, 2fi.fi, 4,4, 4,4 






6plftgj44.141.44,2 






J2.114, 7.hp32pl4, 34,30,30,31,30,26^24, 






.. e , e , a , a , <, , h . .1 , h , u , u , o , b , o , o 




KD 


706 DATA 141,2,212, 16S P 34. 141 p47, 2 ,141 






29,27,51,51 






uA 4ze data fl J i),H 1 f) r ;j l e ,o p b. d „, a, a, 4i,*o 






, 3 p 212, 173 , 170, 6p 20O, 7, 173 . 149, 6, 241, 1 




IN 


700 DATA 44, 60, 2, 5*. 15, 55, 142. l±r, 93. 2 






^4,17,^^1,17,^16.1 r «,o,6pfl 






1,4.4* ,61. ifiS F 112,S6 






l,l4p66p4Z,36p61 i S7,13,l,5,B,37.35r4,l 






TV -IT* data 0,0,0,8,0,0,0,6,4,0,4.4,0,0,4 




1_Q 


71B OATA 233,44,133.112.76. ?4.36pl73,l 






B>*7.44 






, B . B.0.0,O,B,B,O,O,fl,G 






76 , 6 , 2 B B , 7 , 1 7 3 , 169 ,6,261,21.144,41, 166 




11 


776 DATA 62, *5 , 11 , 16. 44 . 72p 43 ,23, 7B , 70 






¥K **fl DATA 34, 41. 37, 0,E1 F 35 ,60,44,26, 0,0 






,H2p3i6,223 F 22pl33,112 






, 9fl F 71 , 7B , 160 , 131 , 1*9,1*6. 146. 174 . 144p 






r * r * ■ * , 6 * * , B r 9 , * , O , B , B , , O , fl r B 




nc 


726 i#TA 16Sp 113, 233, 6, 133, 113, 32, 4* ,4 






14* . 195 ,141,12*, 133 , 1 2 B 






JO 4BB DA T A 0.8,4,4.6,6,8,8,6,0,0,0,6,8,8 






1,173, H5,£, 261,2 E6,2fl fi, 16.1 t5.11Z,Z4 ? 




LIM 


906 OATA 165, 143,116 pi 30, 17 3, 166,190,1 






,6,0.0,0,8,8, ft e,e,e,i> 






10* , 1 40 , 6 , 1 3 3 , 11 2 p 166 ,113 






77, 13 9, 14*, 17*, 100, 171,lSlp2i,l3Zpl67, 






JE 464 *Am 6,6, 0,0, 0,0,0,8, 0,4. 6, 6 ,6, 6. 4 




IV 


734 DATA lB*,141p4, 113 p 113, 76. 76,39,10 






153 h IT* 4 162 , 12 7 p 03 , 61 , 1 22 , 1 B 5 , 1 ? 4 






.8. D. 0,0,0,8,8,6,8,8,8 






6, 113, 66, 237, 169. B, 133. 112. 149,113.217 




HO 


990 DATA 125, 121. 77, 63. 57, 64 p 161,77, 72 






Gf 4?b oat* a.aj^.ftjj ^.e^.g.a.e,?!, 






, 1 7 B , 6 , 13 3 , 113 ,76,76,30 






, 74 p 111, 164, 126, 109, 75 ,44, lli,66p 147 , 6 






tl i B i (I 1 f ^ 1 h ,i fl .i 8 .i 8 , , B , fl 




FU 


746 4A1A 12p46 l 4*p3Z J 137.41,lB0,O,173j 






7 , 1 76 . 7* , 19 B , 13 3 p 104 , 97 






JI *BA 04T4 6.*,6.0,6,fl,flp0,e,fl,fl,0,fl,fl,B 






167^6 ,146, 167, fi, 201, 1 p 144, 14 . 177. 192 . 6 




HE 


10OO DATA 151, 1*2. 143, 134, 134*3*, BA, 12 






rfJJ.I ,4,4.0,0p6pB r O 






, 163 p 30, 26fl , 169, 2fl 






4 p 100,44, 16B,5ZjlflB,lfl3, L66, \ 12,36.231 






JO 470 OUT* 0,92, Q l fl J A l A,a i 4 l ll J B r » l 8,j r B l 




K 


76H DATA 14 1 , ±64 P £,76 P 9B ..22S P 173 , 1 *4 , 6 






, 6.141,3 44,6, ±66 ,113,253,67 






U. B. 0,0, 0,8.9,6, 47, 4fc, 8,6 






r 266 p 146 , 6 , 2 B0 F 22 p 1 73 , 140 , 6 , 2 B6 , 1 4 1 , 6 , ! 




MM 


1414 9ATA 14 1,143, 4, 96, 15 3, 6,56,237, 14 






0D 5 88 DATA 4 7.3B,38,0, 3 5, E2 j&B,44, 47, *6 , 






246. 14 jl**, B . 13 J . 112 






B, 6, 166, 165, 166. 737,141 pO, 174,132, 50, 2 






B,e,47.]!a I .ift 1 »i 1 ijt,i + 0,iJt F iJZ,ni,i7 J i 




CH 


764 iATA 16*p62 v 131,113p2z,44p41,32pl3 






5 3,0,141,±42,6,13fl r ?33 






8 p 13,20, 21 






7.4 1 F 169. 1 F 141. 131,6.164,45.169,6.15 3:. 




OL 


1626 iATA 32,141,143,0,76,173,140.5,13 






EP Sit DAI A Z2r Z3. 2*, 25,16,79,2 32, 3, IBB, fl 






136, 3B h 136 ,16, 256. 169 






3, 126, 173, 1*1*6 j 133, 127. 32. 147 ,4±p 190, 






dUhflx^ifi. S08, fcA, 1, 15,13, 13,15,13,0,8, 




UJ 


770 DATA 12^144. 16*. 6. 169,6. 141, 16fp6, 






4 r ±65 ,133,0, 133 , 1 76 , 34 






frB 






141 , 1 70 , 6 , 1.7 2 , 162 , 6 , 163 , 30 , 2 06 , 177 ,171 




AH 


1B30 DATA 136, 16, 247, *6, 173, 1*2, 6, 133, 






PB 526 PATA ! H ll P 4« J 84ia P 14 J 87 P 73 J 88 d fi9 > 






,6,288,21,169,62,141 






126,173,147,6, 133., 127, 37i 167,41,164*4, 






7 7,69.32.32,77,266,136,6,14,42,159,1,1 




ZH 


706 BdTA 44. 2, 141. 2, 212. 169, 64, 141. 47. 






143,137.6,153, Z±B F 34 , 1 35 






41,130,0,173 






2, 1*1 j, 3, 712, 16*. 265, 141, 111. 6,76, *4, 22 




D6 


144* 0ATA 14,247,96,173,144,6,2.4,103,1 






M6 aso data izi l fi J zes f i7 1 i?i J isa J * J *M 1 7 1 






B , J 6» , 2 11 , 14 1 P 46 , 2 






. 133i 124,173 F 143, 4,160 F 4, 13 3 F 127, 32, 16 






2 fl 4 •, 3 , 230 ,1ZV O , lO » IB j 2 BO , 1 2 B , 6 # 16 , 1 H , 




K« 


7*6 4A1A l4l,2,2lZ,±6*p42,141,47,Zpl41 






7,41.164,4,145,136,6 






173.126.4,201,11 




,3,212,169,22,l*l F 36,2il69,*5 r J41,37 r 2 




HP 


1B60 DATA 153, 255,14. 136, 10, ?47, 76, 169 






VP 54B OAT* ZeS.H/Zfi^lS^tJfi.I.f^.jffi, 






,±61pl,lL41pl6 3,6 






,0,158,4,153,135,0,136,16,250, 160 .176, 






1 p 1ft* , 13 1 P 14-1 , O , 2 F 1ft 3 j 36 , 1 4 1 , J. , 2 , 1 B 4 , 6 




LH 


466 FATA 16» P 26p 141 ,1?4 r 9 . ±6*, 4, 172 , 13 






153,127,717.41,34.144,36 






4, 71, 157,72,16? 






2, 6 fc 103, 3» F 206, 7E F 96. 2 20 , 1 73 , 131 . 6 . T44 




RH 


106* 0ATB 20O.7,16E.126,217 k 4*i36.144, 






EH fiVO D-ATA 3, 141, 4, 3. 1 2, 173, 15 7, 6, 26B, 27. 






, 3 , 7B p 30 , 1 2.B , 173 , 16 






2 1 , Za 4 , ±35, 6 , ±65, 126 , 56 , 249 ,48,30,133, 






17 2, 126 , fl , 2 4 D , 6 j 14 B F 16 j 2 12 , 1 36 j 2*0 , 26* 




r:w 


414 DATA 2 14 , 41 P 4, 246 p fl.. ±6* , 233, 14 1,14 






126 p 145. 127, 74 9,41, 3 6, 133 






, 16ft r BJ plBSj 26 , 36 , 1 41 






4>6. 76 ,162 P 39, 173 p 9,216 p 265, 146,6, 246, 




RT 


1076 DATA 127,7E,179,*1, 200,244, 232. 22 






UL 5 6t PAT* IB, 212,141.22,260, 2-96, 1 3 2 r 4, 2 






11,171,147,6,244,26 






4,5, 206 ,212, 165 , 4 , ±65 ,135,0,176,103,36 






64,147,173,133,6,244. 1*,17J, 131. £.46. 2 




RD 


B20 DATA 266,147.6,76.142,39.32,166,39 






. 36 , 1 S3 , 123 ,6,134,16,243 






6, 16*, 126, 141,6,2,15 9 






,2»B p 17, 173,166p 0,141 „ 147, 6, 76, 162, 39, 




PT 


1**4 OATA 96, 173, 17T. 6, 16.14, 14, 165 r 3. 






BH 57* frfrli 36. 1*1, 1,2, 144. 164, 14*, 64, 16? 






264 , 1 44 , 6 , 2 fl B „ 3 , 3 2 




166 ,10 2,3,180,6,3ft, 157 ,39,15,136, 2*1 , 1 






, B 1 , 141 , B , 2 , 169 ,37,141,1,2, 144 j 1 fl B , 104 




Q? 


414 4ATA Il5,3*p76p*4p224,i73p*,714 l 14 






6,244.*6pl73,ll4p6 






, 64 ,157, 77, 141, B 






1,1 46, 6 > ±66 , 129 ,217, ±57 , 40 , 2* B , 27 , 136 , 




PH 


1*95 DATA IB, 1* . 3* , 165 . 3 . 166 . 142 i 3, 145 






RG EDO P-ATA 2 , 167. 50 . 14 1 , L , 2 F 1B4. 16* , 1*4. 






±92 , 263, 2 BB, 246, 160, 12 , 217 






,15,36, 157 ,73,35, 136 , 1 82 , ±6 , 2 *6 , 90 , 1 7 3 






64, 72 p 172, 71. 173 . ill, 6. 2 41,61 F ?f«>UX. 




vz 


444 DATA Jlp41,24fl,12plt6,16,Z44,lt9,2. 




, 171.4, 16 p 14. Z4,1B5 






& r iS.3 r 76,El,37 






66, 14 1,14 6. 6, 24 1.14 7,4,96.76, 73.* A, 152 


F* 


±1*8 OAT* 3, 166, 462,3.145,16.36. 137, IX 






DF 5>0 Dfiffl 230 F lEtpft J ,Zftftp3,Z-36 H 174 J 6 F -161 






,192,126,2*0,*, 192,129 




3,38,136,28 2,16,2*6,95,173, J 55, 6 j 141,1 






P J. 141 p 132 r 6, 16*.fl.3?7.112,141i J,ai,3Ei 




rn 


066 OATA 2BBj4,lE3,0pZ40,3Bpia2,*7pl44 




36 P b r 32 P 1 10 , 42 , 15 8 , 2 






165.1'lrX«.i63, F 134 F 35 






.9. 1*2 . £21. 176,5, Si. 233 r 14 , 766 , 21. 174/ 


m 


1114 DATA 145,135.4. 153,107-. 43, 134 p!6 f 






HH 6flO frftTfl 2BOj 1D2 F 42, ZOO , 24 & , 2 3B . 1 1 i , 20 






133.6,246.14,1*7,33 




247,36,173,156.6.141. 1 54 i 6 . 32 , 1 66, 47, 1 






8.2.23*>tt3. 32 T44, 41 ,32^137, 41,173, 144 




zn 


B60 DATA 14 4,14,172.39,176-, 10,24, 103, 3 




4A, 2 , 143, 13 5,6, 15 3 , 147 












2 . 224 , Z , 240 ,3,24, 103 ,32,174,114,6, Z0O . 


f.F 


112 6 PAT* 4 3, 135, 16, 2 4 7, 96, 17 3, IS 2, 6,7 






OP 616 DATA 146pfi,ZgS,141 F B F Ze6pl4 F 10? F P P 






2, 9.129, 174, 142. 6 




3, 1, 14, 16. 24,143. 3 ,166 , 162, 3 . 165. 14,36 






±33 ,112, 169 j 62 p 1 3 3 , 113 F 3 2 r 44 , 41 F 3 2 , 1 3 7 




¥>* 


67* DATA 2*B, 6, 174. ±*3, 6, 2*6,09,100,0, 




, 157, 167, 43, 13 , 2*2 






r 41, 173,132, 1,141.4 






14S .112, ±73 , 166 ,0,141, 140 , 6 , 152 ,174 , 16 


nv 


1136 DATA 1ft, 24 p 36, 1 7 3, 107 p 6, 16,10,24 






U^ 626 BAT* 217. 16^ F fl|. 141. a, 2. 16S F 37. 141 






I , A , 13 7 , 16 , Z00 ,17 3, 144 




,165,3,168, 162,3,163 ,14,36, IS 7, 22 7, 43, 






j 1 p 2 F 164 , 160 F 1*4 r 64 F 7 2 r 1.VZ F FZ . iftf .3.1* 




MM 


444 iATA 6,245,144.4,246,25.173.1*6,6. 






136, 2*2, 16 . 246. 9ft, 173 






1,4,212.173. 157.K 






765.141.6.206. *7 , 230M*0, 6. 200. J, 230,1 




HU 


1148 B-ATA 2,211, 41 ,8,74,24,165,2, 166,1 






6U 63t DATA 2-BB F Z7,172, 128*6^48, 6, 14H P 1H 






41, 6, 3 2, 67,* 1.32. 






67. 3 .169 . 18,36, 167, 11 ,44. 136. 742 , 16 . 74 






j 212 F 136j 206, 2BO, 166, fl F IflS, 2B , 36, 141 P 1 




HP 


4*4 iATA 66,41,32 ,117. 41, 23*hJ17p 2*4.2 






0,96. 161. 9,1*1. 115 






6,212.141,22, ZOO , 2*6 , 1 7 Z 






, 23*0 , 1 1 3 , 72 , *4 , 4 1 , 3 Z , 1 3 7 , 41 , 3 2 , 66 , 40 , 1 




KO 


115 B OATA 6,141,116,5,141,137,0,152,6, 






AI 04fl OATA 4pZflBp24t,16t.76.l4l F « r 2.1«f F 






6*. t,96. 162, 16. lii 






1 7 3 , 16* p 5 , 36 p 253 , 36 , 36 , 1 4 4 , , 1 41 , 130 , 5 






i* r 141, 1.2.144,3 66.144.64. 173,166.4,24 




TK 


966 iATA 165.210.47,173,126,105*711.47 






,254,135,6,700,237 























38 Page 6 - Issue 37 



EDITOR 



-.1* 1168 DATA ^a.^^j.i^Oft.jAi, uw.-i.n 1 .,. 

14S,B r 17Q, l^ J jl,ia,lS3,lJE i e j 13ft. It- . - - 

■J p Iftj 248, 240 .-»?. *4 , 34 
VU 11?A ftflTfl 112 r ii2,hK,H J i.l,i ( ii2,tt.afl, 

* J . 2 , ? . 2 . 2 , II 2 , 39 , 24 , 4 4 , 2 . 1 I 2 , 66 . L 4 . I 

4.112,112,56 
P* .1*11 0AIA 144,44, U2p46,144p44, 112,248 

.fl?^«i..H.M,zn 1 «,» f ii 1 # J ii,ij 1 e,a,a r B 1 
Ft" 1178 DATA (.1/4, 175,100, 169,475,1/4. L7 

i , 1 2 , 1 7i , i as . 1 74 r ifli , a , b , , o , ft , a , « , p , 

mv 1200 QaYa fl J *,,B r i J a J o J fl- r i P A 1 ti J B.tf i o.a 1 

6, J 3, 13 P 13, J 3, 13. P 3, 13, 13 p 13, 13, 13 

HH 17,0 DATA 1 3 , ■ r 0- , , ft, * , 9 . 8 , B . B . 6 r a , B , ft 

.b,o, ft, A, a. 0.8,8,8,0, a, 51* 

TK 1ZZ0 OATA 37.44,17,23,32,8,36,37,44, J3 
, 97, B,fl, 8, 8,24,0, «, 8,8,0, B, 0,8, 0.4 

IH 12 39 Oft T ft B,8,e, 8, A , 0.0,0,0, 0,0,8,8,5 8 

,37,48,37.33,32,8,50,33,51,3 7,4,0 
CT 1Z40 DATA *.0.0,Z6,8,B,0,8,B,Q,«,t1,B, * 

UM 1258 ^1A 0,43,17. E7, , 15 p44 , 41 , 3 5, 4 3 , 

9 , , fl r , # , , B , Zfl j, e p « p B , ft , 4- P B ■ , B 

«' E0, 33, 31,52,37, 50,4, 4ft p 47, 53,53 
£H 1270 DATA 41,45,37,0.0.24.4,8,8,0,0,6, 



KG 17«« *APA 0, B.B^Ifi, J3. 31,31, 37,52,52. J 
7,0,45.4 7.92,4?p50,0,B,26,*.0.B,0,B,B 



P4V 123 



• ,4, 8, 44 ,4 7, 33, 34,4, 5Z. 37, 5 6,52 
P* ±300 MTft l,i J l i * i M,l.l.l, B , Mh l^, 
j , B j , , • . * . j, , ft , B j. 

JJ 131* bar* B>0.t,t, 4,81,33,54,37,4, 52, 3 

?,fit.i2,ft,B l B 1 e,e,B 1 rt 1 ij,B 1 B.e,e 

fl 9 ■ B , V j B , j, ft , ■ , , . B r 3 3, 43, , 

ti . B . 36 , 4 7 r 55 . 43 , B , 3 3 , 5 B , 50 , 4 V , ft $. . * 

PL 1130 DATA 52, 47, *,44p47, 54,37,1?. 50,1? 

pS1,53 p 58, 46, 8. 52,47,8 ,41,37,44,37, 33. 

■2,0,4 

QM 1340 DAT* 4-.B,B,B,8,a,B,e,8.*,0,B,a,0, 



p ■ w , d , ipifVji 



0.4,8,8,8,0,0, 4 64, 469 ,1? 2 ,166, 174 
HC 13B.0 DATA 141,173, 165, 454. 6,0, 0.0., ft,B r 



HI 137* PAT* 0,0,8.0,0,0. 0,0,41, 45, 47, B, 3 

7, 50, 5B, 4 7, 94, 0,13,8,40, 44, 3 7, 11, SI, 37 

tn 1300 BAY* 4,50.37,32,30,67.8,0,0,0,0,0 



XT 130* 9ATA ft, 8, 173, 161, 6i 140, 3, 78, 90,22 

0,153, 192 . 1 4 1 , 14 , Z 12 , 1 73 , 164 , 6 , 240 , * , 2 

00,154,15,76,1^11,45 
2T 1408 DAYA 173. 102,4, 2.40,13,200, 15.2, 0,1 

44, 3, 79 P 1 78 ,45, 103 ,4, 141, 1. 218, 173, 16 3 

,4,240,14, 233 ,183,3 
JA 1418 DATA 240, » # *4 ,179,43,109,144,141, 

248,42. 1&9.44. 141, 24 7,42,173, IS?,&. ZOfl 

,87,473,11,208, 203. , 7 p 244 
■H 1420 OATfl 84,281, 2,200. 73. 173, 131 ,6,48 

*7, 15? , 40. 16B . 34, 75 , 119. 45 , 142 , 02 , J 66, 

00,142, 48, I, 142, Z 
HU 1410 PAYA 211, 144 P 49,Z, 140, 3,212, 14*, 1 

36,141, 30, 2, IE 9, 37, 14 1.37,7;, 183, 0,1 41, 

453,6.163,28,141, 164 
UD 1448 DATA 4, 1? I ,185,5,141,447,4,173.13 

9.6,141, 148, G . 14?, 293 . 141, 145 ,8, 169 . 4 . 

372.142,8,153,38,230 
IP 1458 DATA 70, 30, 2:26, 173, 15.114,41.4,24 

4,8.18 9,25 5,141.146,4, 75,99,228,173,9, 

21 . 249 , 14 5,5, 208 , 1 I 
HK 1400 DATA 171,147,5.248,22,2*0.447,4,7 

0,34,228,32,144,49,141,3,206,17,173,15 
3,4,141, 147 , ft , 74 , 70 
PP 1474 PAYA 228, 206, 146, 6.244, 3, 32, 240. 4 
5, 76. 76, 224, 173, 159, 6, 144. 1 P 74,42,47,1 



/J, 9,219, HI. 146,5 
Ul I i«B OAT ft 20 f, L 4, 248,14, 281. 14, 248, 29, 
241,12, 240,61, HV, Wj. 14 L, 14/, ft. f&, 32, 
118,46,^06, 138,6^15,5 
0^ 1479 DATA I A 9, 9 , 141 , 158 j ft . 3 2 . 21 B , +6, 76 
. 56 . 46 , 3 2 , 21 , 4ft , 2 -S 9 . 1 3B , 6 , 1 73 . J 46 , * , 2 
ft 1 , 7 , 2 0B , 5 , 1 fc9 , 
Ml 1508 DATA 141, 168,6, 32, ?I4, 45. 173,154, 
l>, 14 1, 140, B. 19 ?,0,1 72, 15?, 4, 153, 38.2 011 
,73,173,158,6, 10,16fl 
W 1614 BATA 185,89.44.133,125,166,^0,46, 
1 33 , 1 27 , 1 , 1 1 9 h fl j i 03 , 40 . 1 24 . 4C , 1 45 , 4 
, 1 S3 , 46, 17 3, 40, 176. 45, 287 
JZ 15?0 pftTA 46, 236,455, 6, 1?3. 155,5, 3*1,4 
1, 2B8, 5. 14 7, IB, 141 , 156, 0. 32 r 47, 4 2, 70, 5 
6, 43, 23B, 156,4,173 
16 1536 DAYA 156. 6„23l, 3.1, 2B6, 5, 147,1,141 
>*56.0,3Z, 78,42.76,54. 44, 173, 152, 6, 7J. 
l,141 i 152;",6.3z 
N^ 10414 DAYA »t, 42. 76. 39, 46, 173, 157, 4. 73, 
1,141, 157 .6,32,116,41,78,56,44.173,2,2 
11,73,8,141.2 
H. 1550 PAYA 211.32,137,42,169,255,141,14 
7 ,4, 173, 13ft, 5, 141 . 144, 9, 35 , 1.69, 1, £41 , 1 
53,6,32,0,47,78,38 
VJ 1358 8AfA 44.137, Z , 141,159.5. 3 2,4,47,7 
0,58,44, 173. 146, 3, 18, IB, 14,141,136,6,1 
8,18,24,109,140 
Yf 1570 4ATA 5,105.1 ,t*5. 04.193, 126.469 .4 
3, 105, 3, 131, IZ7, 172, 156, 6. 104, 33, 30, 16 
6, 177, 125, 71, 124, 140,1 26 
CT 1944 DATA 136 ^14 ,2 47, 74, 15 3, 164, 141, 24 
2,41, 10 0,44, 141,24 3, 43, 197,0, 141, 14*, 
, 168. 7 , 161 , ,133 , 103, 44 
T£ 13*0 6ATA 163,32,153, 16. 45. lJ6 r 16, 243, 
147, 129, 144, £*3, 44, 73,173,7,340.141.14 
6,0. 144, 38 , 2±7, 157, 40, 244 
L6 16BB 44T4 t4,130,16^Z4Od2*l^Sr,Z48,75, 
2*1 ,23, 240, 97, 2*1 ,12, Z40, 115,141, 255, 1 
41,140,4, 141 , 147 ,6,94,1 72 
AK 1610 B0T4 19,144,251,192,27,144,4,172, 
33,144,243. 452/ , 17 Z, IBB, 5,163. 341, 4 4, 24 
, 148, 3 2, 153 . 14, 40, 172, 7 
UH 1424 4AY A 240, 4, 210. 104, 8, ZB0, 165, 241, 
44, 7, 42/0. 193, 2.33 , 44 , 109,8, 1 72 , 13Z ,6, 15 
1,30,288^471.154,6,141 
G* 1634 PAYA 146,6,169.0,76,172,168,6,240 
,132,409,4,433 283, 44, 15 3, 14, 44 ,138, 15 
1 , 263 , 44 , 441 ,14,44, 148 
RV 1444 DATA 160,6.70.112,4 7,164,144,141, 
141, 42 , 167, 44, 444 , 241, 42 , 167, B, 172 . 462 
,6, 153, 14.200, 141, 15:9 .1 
HU 2888 8ATA 94 , 187, 1, 141, 44k. 6. 149 , 0, 172 
,152, 6, 15 3, 3*, 289,172^160, 6, 1*9.28 3. 44 
,41,127,153,243,44,76 
5M 1444 PAYA 2X6,47.0,40,34,49/70,40, i«7. 
48, ±13 . 44 . L4B , 40, 157,44, 160, 40, 321, 46. 
8,47,87,49,124,47 
Ztt 1478 DATA 169. 4, 133, 1.12, 169. 52, 113, 113 
*11 .44, 41 , 32, 65 ,44, 12 , 137, 41, 169, 8 , 474 
,15 2,5, 157 , 30 , 268 , 76 
U9 1680 D4T4 54,44,169,8,24. 109,140,4, 133 
, 112 ,189, 62, 109 , 141, , 133, 113, 32 ,44 .41 
* 31 , 65 . 44 , 32 , 1 37 , 41 
UD 1690 DATA 76, 253, 47, 171, 14*, 8, 280,5. 17* 
1, 148 , 5,240, 216, 153, 112,56, 233 . 1, 133, 1 
12, 166,113,333i6,l33,113 
*F 17*0 PAYA 32,44,41,32,53,40,32,137,41, 
76, 39,44, 173 , 144 ,5, 2*9 . 144, 8 , 266, 8 , 17| 
,145,6,205,141,6 
BE 1718 DATA 240,175,210,112,200,1.2 34.11 
3, 2 38, 14 4, 6, 2BB, 3. 2 30, 143, 6, 32, 55, 4*. 3 
2,137,44,74,33,40,173 
DJ 472* PAYA 134,6.73,1,141,134.6,31.5,42 
,74,191,47,173,413,4,71,1,141,133,6.20 
1,3,300,3. 141 

MP 1738 DATA 1,141, 133, ft, 32, 219. 41, 78, 253 



# 47 P 1*1,0, 141,U3,ft.3z, a 3 7, 4 J . 70, 2*p3,4 
7,169,1,141. 133,6 
40 1/48 DATA 17,237,41,76,25^,47.173,148, 
G.*6. 237, 144,0, J[J1,1 SB ,6, 173, 14 1.6,237 
, 145. 6 , 2 68, IB . 1 71 , 154 
(!l_ 1750 0A1A 6,201,16,174,^,75.8.48,165,1 
12, 24 , 1*5, 10 , 1 33 , 112, 165 , 1 1 J , IBS , B , 113 
,113, 32,44, 41. 32.65 
EP 3 7ft3 DATA 40,14.137,4 1,71,, 3 9.40,1/3,14 
4,4,ZBl r 18,176,8, 1 73, 145. 9, 286,3,76, fl 
6,47,166,112.56,233 
K0J 1776 DATA 10,133,112.165,113,2^3,0,133 
,113. 32,44,41, 12.65.48,32,137.44,75,39 
, 4 1 . 1 7 3 , 14 4 , 6 , 2 08 , 5 
Aft 17 81, DATA 1/3,145,6,248,1*1. 1/3,144,6, 
Z B5 , 1 4 8 , 6 , 203 .34,173,145,6,2*5, 141 ,5,2 
06, 26, 173, 440, 6, 5b, Z33 
p+L 17** PATA 1,141,140,6,173.141,6,233.0. 
141, 141. 6. 32, 68, 41, 32, 87. 41, 12,112,41, 
165,112,56,231,1 
15 1BB0 frftrA 133,112,465,113,233,6,133,11 
3 „ 32 ,44, 41 , 168, B , 162, 1491 . 112, 32 ,65, 48, 
3Z, 137,41. 76.53, 48,17 3 
H8 4014 PAYA 144, 0.245, 148, 6, 268, 0,iri, 14 
5,4,2*9,141,5,240, 14.159, 1,141,165,6,1 
41, 166,6,76,17,48 
5|= 1420 DAYA 76.253,47,78,56,40,171,142,6 

,280. 9, 173, 14 3,, 6, 244. 243, 169 pi, 44 4. 144 
,6,141, 166.6,76,37 
mf 1410 DATA 40, 149, Bp 24, 187,144.6.141,16 
7, 4, 167p 3 2, 189, 14 4, 6. 141 ^166, 6,165,112 
,133,116,165,113,133,117 
PH 1840 B4TA 162 ,fl,460. 1.17?, 129, ±29, 424, 
165, 126 , 245, 107 p5 . 288. 7, 165. 127 , 208, 15 
0,ftp 240, 6,230, 128,288,234 
ZB 105* BftTA 238,127,204,235,159,4,129.11 
3,288,140.0,173,148,6,261,155,288,3,20 
6,141,6,12.60. 41,32,65 
OV i860 DATA 40,12p07,41,32,112.41,±63,8, 
141^165,5,144.464^6,76,166,32,46 9^0,24 
,1*9114*, 4, 133,426 
Hf 1876 DATA 167,52,189,441.6,133,127,154 
,1,182,8,441,12b, 143 , ±25 , 445 .116,137,1 
11. 206, 6, 155, 127, 177. 113,240 
LZ 4944 PAT A ±2,l7a,116.145 lf lZ6,Z81,?55,2 
88,232 . 190 ,127, 280,210 . 149, 3, 129, 411. 2 
34,148,6,206.3.233,141,6,32 
UC 459* DAYA 68, 41, 32, 66,40, 32,87,41,12,1 
±2,4 4,16 9,0,141,464.4,141,166,8,76.164 
,32,240,144,87,30 
54 1944 DATA 34> til, llZ, ±12, 441, 142 , 112, 1 
12 . 2 44 . 218 , 1 34 , 19 p 7 , ±38 , 36 , 442 . 1 1 2 , ±± 
2,111, 11 2, ±22:, 112, 112, 112 ,246, 8 7 
Tr 1910 DATA 10.34, 65, 40, 3 4. 72,169, 36 ,441 
,14,212,141,4.212,173,132.0.141x4,212, 
16 7, 76 ,141,22,280, 167 
UP 1920 40TA 74,141,23,240,161,106,444,14 
, 288, 159 , 110 , 141, 25, 2B0, 161 , 144 ,141,0, 
2, 469,56,181,1, 2, 494 t 64 
XK ±738 DATA 72,138,72,452,72,187,5,441.1 
. Z 12 ,141,4,242,141,Z2, 208 ,141,23, 288 , 
4 41,24,28 8, 14 4.25,7.88, 162 
24 ±94* OATA 6,172,132,4,141,10,212,234,2 
34, 234 , 141 , IB, 212, 234 ,214, 234, 208. 140, 
4 , 2 41,142 , 206, £3 7, 2*6. 13 2,4 
14 1758 DATA 14, 73,159,7, 141, 131,5, 444i4, 
177,112, 141 ,141, 33, IBS, 137, 39, 133, 136, 
35,208,172,25.204,245,238 
ZI ±966 DATA 112,288, 2. £34, 113, 234. 109 T 6. 
288,3,2 30,170,9,32,4 4,41,3 2,13 7,41,173 
,144,6,283,444,6,240 
IR 1978 PflTA 22,173.145,8,285,144,0,246,1 
4,183,0.131,112,16 9,52.113,113,32,44.4 
1,32,137,41, 469,2,141 
VY 1904 PATA ±,212,169,132.141,22,1*0.1*33 
.01,141,8,2,169,37,141,1,2,104,166,104 
,±76,444,64,226,2,2 27,2,8,3 2 



Page 6 - Issue 37 39 



Mark Hutchinson's 

Random Notes on the Atari 



£+ ometime ago I enquired in this column about the use that 
^^ people put their A l ARl's to. It was only a general ques- 
LJ tion and I did not really expect a lot of response. How 
wrong could I be about our dedicated band of PAGE 6 readers? 
Many of the uses to which Atari owners put their machines are 
interesting but most people seem to think thai they are the only 
ones interested in using their Atari in a particular way. They are 
probably wrong, there is someone, somewhere in the Atari world 
who is also interested. Here are just a few samples of the letters 
that gave my postman his hernia, maybe we could get a few 
people together?. 

A MYRIAD USES 

Are you retired? Mr Arnold Beecroft of 91b Dowell Close, 
Taunton, Somerset, TA2 6AU would like to set up a group for 
retired or elderly people. He would be quite surprised at the 
number of letters I get from people in their mid seventies! J think 
this is an excellent idea and 1 wholeheartedly encourage him. 
Why not write to him and see what can be accomplished for 14p 
plus an 5AE! Arthur Morris of Romford (who just happens to be 
retired himself) was so pleased with William Renbow's article on 
producing a book that he has now produced his own book and 
saved a few hundred pounds. 

My thanks to Nigel Holly man for the thirst quencher, and 
apologies for the wait! Jack Taylor of Cumbria has written a 
program to help him with stocks and shares and he informs me 
that he also uses it for football pools, with J moderate success'. He 
also uses a football analysis program which, he states modestly, 
has not mode him more than a few hundred pounds! Any offers 
for the program? 

] bet you thought that preach.ro had an easy time, didn't you? 
lust a few sermons on Sunday and a few visits here and there, 
right? Wrong t lohn |arvts wrote to me about his use of the 
computer and it is quite extensive. If there are any other mem- 
bers of the doth who might be interested in a utility program 
that |ohn wrote to help him with his duties then you can contact 
him at 205, Great Hivings, Chesham, Bucks, HP5 ZLQ. 
All the way from Italy, on what looks like real hand mode paper 
(can it be true?), comes a letter from Paul and Luda Clark They 
run a hotel and were not too impressed by Mini Office 2. Like 
many other people who have written over the past few months, 
they wouid like to see a good database that works first time, but 
preferably one that can be tailored to Tit most needs. If we had 
someone to start this program then it could become a series of 
updates each issue. 

WRITING PROGRAMS FOR SUBMISSION 

This brings me to the issue of programs submitted by readers. 
QK r you have a great program that works for you, Fine. But will 
it be useful for others, as it stands? Does it need tidied up to cut 
down on memory usage? What about REM's? If someone wants 
to use it then they may also want to amend it. Where most 
programs fall down Is in the documentation. I know the old 
adage, and we all do it, When all else fails, read the manual' 
however, when all else fails the manual needs to be there. Try to 
send your program as a LJSTed file as well as an ordinary SAVE. 
Also, use single density, DOS 2,0 or 2,5 format not DOS 3.0, 

LETTERS AT LAST! 

I have had an amazing response to this column since the 
change of format, and 1 have to apologise here and now to those 
of you who may be wailing a reply. I really do have a backlog of 



The Ways you use your 

Atari ... 

Submitting programs ... 

Lots of Letters 



mail to catch up on. Who said, *Work expands to fill the 
available time."? It is true. 1 seem to have even less time now, 
however those that included an SAE will get their reply just as 
.soon as I can get it out. 

Nice to hear from Paul Rixon again with (after how many 
years?) an answer to the Coons Patch' question osked so long 
ago in this column. It is a technique of 3-D surface representa- 
tion pioneered by S.A. Coons. We finally get there in the ends, 
folks! He also told me of his disappointment in the, so called, 
ATARI Games Centres. Anyone el$£ find this? (Lots of other 
letters saying the some thing, Ed.) 

Paul, along with a lot of other readers, has complained about 
the lack of 8-bit software. Probably the best thing would be to 
start some sort of petition at the next Atari Show> signed by all 
who want new 8-bit stuff on the market, At the end of the show, 
copies could be given or sent to as many software producers as 
possible. If they see the demand they might well try to produce 
mote software. The alternative is to get your hands on older 
software. 1 know that many of you have had your ATARI'S for 
years, but what about the new owners of two to three years? How 
many of them have played RasterBluster', to my mind the best 
pin ball game ever for the 8-bit? Crypts of terror? Wizard of Wot? 
Astrochase? I could go on and on. Why can't these programs be 
brought out again on budget labels? These games were all 
available in the UK and were excellent for their time and most of 
them still stand up well today. There are many more that 
appeared only in the USA and have not been seen for some 
years r including a game and a utility for the ANTIC mode 4 and 
5 screens - something seldom fully used over here. 
I believe the future of 8 bit software is in your hands, starting 
with the next show (I write this in February). I know users will 
read and think hard about this suggestion, but will any of the 
software houses or vendors take the chance with older, and in 
my humble opinion sometimes much better, software? Time will 
tell 

RAMBLING ON ... 

Next issue I would like to ramble on about moving from an 
S-bit to a 16-bit system and how traumatic it can be for some of 
us (if something else does not grab my attention beforehand!). If 
any of you have bought an ST and immediately got rid of it, 
please let me know why. I have one or two comments to write at 
the moment and I am sure that you can guess that at least one 
will be levelled at ATARI UK themselves, 1 will really try not to be 
too vitriolic however! 

Don't forget to write about anything interesting in the Atari 
world to Mark Hutchinson , 1 P Hollymount, 
Erinvale, Finaghy, Belfast BTIO OGL 



40 Page 6 - Issue 37 





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Page 6 - Issue 37 41 



T 
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A TUTORIAL SERIES BY GORDON CAMERON 



2 GOING ON TO 



PROCEDURES 



Did you spot the deliberate mistakes in the last 
article? I cunningly neglected to put in the line, 
'45 GOTO 10', in the Atari Basic program on 
Page 30, column 2, doing the language an injus- 
tice it didn't deserve! The eagle-eyed amongst 
you will also notice that I broke the rule stated in 
bold type in the text - 1 should NOT have the 
word 'THEN 1 after the IF statement on line 30, in 
the DO-LOOP example on Page 31, column 2. 
Also, a line, 65 Y=X*X\ would certainly enhance 
the program. If you spotted these little 'errs 1 , full 
marks. If nol r pay a bit more attention this time! 
I'm very sorry „ won't let it happen again E 
Lost time, [ tried to cover the language in 
general, as well as trying to introduce the struc- 
tured commands available, I'll try to continue in 
this last vein this time, by talking about another 
structured idea - that of the procedure. Proce- 
dures are supported to a certain extent in Turbo 
Basic, and can help improve readability and 
undcrstandability, as well as moking sizeable 
programs easier to write. 
There are many times when it is tempting to 
write the same piece of code many times in the 
same proyrum. This is wasteful of space, and 
confuses your program. In such a case, you could 
write the bit of code which is used repeatedly as 
a PROCEDURE. Procedures can be used to 
do specific TASKS, and bearing this in mind, 
programming becomes simpler. Normally, when 
you write a program r you are probably tempted 
to write the whole thing at once - 1 know, as this 
is what I used to do! It is simpler, however, to 
break a problem (which your program will even- 
tually solve) down into a set of smaller tasks, 
which in turn can be broken down, and so on. 
For example, when writing an art package, it 
would be easier to sit down and write separate 
procedures to, for example. Draw a line, Fill an 
Area, Plot a Point, Detect a movement, Load a 
Picture etc., rather than attempt to write the 
whole thing from scratch. This approach means 
that, at each 5tep r you concentrate on that task 
ONLY, and work on it until it works, You don't 
worry about how it'll interact with the rest of the 
program, gel the modules to work individually, 
and they'll hopefully work when put together. 

PROCEDURES IN TURBO-BASIC 

The above examples are all very well, but what 
does it actually mean in practice? You have 
probably written tasks or Procedures of your own, 
without knowing It. If you've ever used sub- 
routines in Atari Basic, then these are very simi- 
lar indeed. You write a subroutine which does 
something, and your program uses GOSUB to 
cull this subroutine. At the end of the subroutine, 



marked by J RETURNS the main program carries on where it left 
off. Instead of GOSUB, you use the following syntax to use a 
procedure in Turbo Basic 

HO FRQC <prooedupe name> 

ISO — 

1 30 - 'Body F of procedure ■ 

140 - 

ISO EHDPROO 

The body of the procedure is the program instructions. These 
lines are automatically indented. To cult the procedure, you use 
it r s name, and NOT its line number i.e. 

EXEC < procedure name> 

When the procedure Ls finished, and your computer gets to the 
line ENDPROC, the program will then continue running 

from the place where EXEC called the procedure, 
When programming p you may have a commonly used bit of 
code which, say, clears the screen and this gets called whenever 
your program needs to clear the screen. You can Implement this 
In Atari Basic with the subroutine at line 9000, for example, 
then., 'GOSUB TO00 r will clear the screen. Alternatively, in Turbo 
Basic, you could write a procedure. The main differences are 

1. Procedures have a name, and you call them by that 
name, and NOT by a line number (e.g. 'GOSUB 9000' 
becomes 'EXEC CLEARS 

2. The code in your procedure is automatically indented., so 
you know what code is done by that procedure. In sub- 
routines, it is often difficult to know what refers to what. 

I'd better give you some concrete examples. The following 
procedure, and corresponding subroutine in the old basic, will 
draw a border on the Gr, screen : 



TURBO-BASIC 


ATARI-BASIC 


(with procedures) 


(subroutine) 


130 FROC BOEDER 


130 REM Atari B&SiO Border 


140 P03. 0, 1 PRINT " <38 tl 9>" 


140 FOS.0, i:?"<3e* h &>" 


150 FORI^£T0 19 


160 F0RL=8TO 19 


ISO FOB. 1,L: PRINT "*" 


160 POS. ljL ;?■•-" 


170 FOB- 06, L: PRIHT "*' 


170 POS. 58, L:?- 1 *" 


L80 MBXTL 


130 KEXTL 


L90 P0S. 0. £0:FRINT " *38 * 1 S> 1 


190 FOB* 0,330:? "<38*'A> H 


200 ENDFR0C 


200 RETURN 



You could call it by having lines like the following 



TURBO BASIC Procedure Call 

400 EZE0 BORDER 
430 STOP 



ATARI-BASIC subroutine 

400 GOSUB 130 
430 STOF 



There is not a lot of difference in the above examples but you 



42 Page 6 -Issue 37 



can begin to see the advantages that the structuring and inde- 
nting make in Turbo- Basic. I am sure you will agree that it is 
much easier to follow and read the TB program. The fact that the 
procedure is called by name, and not line number, also makes 
the language more 'English-like'. 

To make your programs even more readable, 1 recommend 
putting a couple of rem minus lines before and after every 
procedure {remember, type 2 minuses on a line to get this effect.) 
Listings 1 and 2 demonstrate this quite well, and the comment 
lines have the effect of 'separating out' the individual parts of 
the program. 

Note that in Turbo Basic, you are not allowed to let the 
program pass over a procedure definition an error will occur Jus! 
as in Atari Basic if you let your program run right through a 
subroutine without calling it . In Turbo Basic you need to put 
your main program at the beginning, with the procedures listed 
later on and you must have a STOP before the start of your 
procedures. Unless, that is, you make use of ..,.. 

THE GO# COMMAND 

You can have the procedures first, with the main program at the 
the end. To do this, many programmers use the GO# command 
at the start of their program. This is a Turbo Basic command 
which, like GOTO, jumps to a bit of code. Aaarggh, I hear you 
say - messy jumps. CO# is better however, as it goes to a 
LABEL, and NOT a line number. That way, if you renumber a 
program, you don't affect where the program jumps to. So, if you 
HAVE to jump somewhcre r use GQ#. For the destination of one of 
these jumps, you need to have a line on its own, with the label 
name, preceded by a # sign , For example 

10 G0# MAIM 



9000 # MAIN 

0010 REM MAIN PROGRAM STAHTS HERE 

If you use this to skLp past your procedures, you have the 
following structure : 

Goto the Main Program 
Procedure 1 
Procedure 2 

Procedure n 
Main Program 

with the procedures that your program uses listed before the 
main program. The first procedure is commonly a setup one, 
listings 1 and 2 show how the GO# command skips past the 
procedures to get to the main code. Remember, if you start 
running out of lines r you can always use RENUM, as described 
in the last issue. 

STARTING TO USE PROCEDURES 

You now know enough to start writing some procedures of your 
own, perhaps to do such simple tasks such as setting up the 

screen, drawing borders, and so on. Remember - you can put any 
code in a procedure that you would normally put in your 
program. That includes loops, tests and other control structures, 
as well as the normal commands. As a general guide, if you 
have to write a bit of program to do a particular job then put it 
in a procedure if 

the bit of program ts u$%d more than once 

ft is more than, say, a puge in length, and 

if you reckon the use of a procedure wiU improve the 'tooJf and 

readability or your program, 



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listing 1 



You do not HAVE to use procedures. Turbo Basic will quite 
happily allow you to go on using subroutines, as in Atari Basic, 
and, if you want you con go on using GOTO's all over the plut;e, 
and creating spaghetti code. Turbo Basic merely gives you the 
option to put a bit of structure into your programs, 

A QUICK INTERLUDE 

As a bit of light relief, before I continue waffling on about 
procedures^ Lhe following two commands will be of use if you 
have ever used the ON ... GOTO or ON ... GOSUB commands in 
Turbo Basic. I've been trying desperately to plug procedures, and 
the use of GO# instead of the normal GOTO, however, whqt if 
you need to use the ON <variable> r type of expression? Do not 
fear. Turbo Basic has the following commands 

ON <variablc> EXEC procedure!, procedureZ, .,, procedure n 
ON <variable> GO# label 1, label2, ... label n 

What the ubuve will actually do will be obvious to those of you 
who have used the Atari Basic: equivalents. Otherwise, a brief 
description is in order. The first command means that if the 
value of <variable> is l p then procedure 1 will be executed. If 
<variable> has the value 2, then procedure! will be executed, 
and so on. As a quick example, suppose that, depending on the 

continued ovzrteaf 



Page 6 - t&sue A? 



4* 



value of a variable choice, you want to 

h Call a procedure to add 

2, Call a procedure to subtract 

3. Call a procedure to multiply 
4 r Call a procedure to divide 

the bit of program might look like 

10 OK CHOICE EXEC ADD, SUBTRACT, MULTIPLY, DIVIDE 

If CHOICE is I, then add will be executed, if CHOICE is 2 then 
subtract will be executed, and so on. When the procedure has 
been completed, the program will return to the line after the 
ON ... EXEC one. 
The ON ... GO# command works In an Identical fashion. 

DUMP and TRACE 

To round off this little excursion, these two commands will be of 
use when you start experimenting with Turbo Basic. The com- 
mand DUMP 15 usually typed after a program has stopped 

running, whether it be after a crash or a successful run. Vou type 
It In on its own r and press Return - no line number. What DUMP 
does is to give you a list of ALL variables and their values at the 
point when the program stopped, It also, handily, lists the names 
of all procedures and labels, together with the line where they 
are located. Numeric arrays are shown along with the DIMed 
values plus one. Strings names are followed by their current 
length, then the DlM J ed size. Don't worry if you don't follow - 
just try it! The details tend to scroll past quite quickly r so use 
CTRL 1 to pause, and browse ot will, 

The second useful command is TRACE- When you type this, 
and execute a program, as well as the program executing, the 
computer will also output the last line number completed success 
fully, In this fashion, you can determine where the computer is 
when a certain 'thing" Is done. It's great but don't take my word 
for It - try for yourself. When you are finished 'tracing' the 
program, the command TRACE - will disable the feature, and 
allow program to run without the line numbers being displayed, 

Anyway, iVe been waylaid long enough - back to procedures! 

HOW DO I USE PROCEDURES 
EFFECTIVELY? 

As you have probably noticed, the procedures I have talked 
about do the same thing EVERY Lime e.g. always draw a border 
or, like the following extract, always set up the screen. 

50 PROCSTABTUP 

60 FOEE 752, 1 

70 SETCOLORS, f 

80 SETCOLOR 1, 14, 14 

90 PRINT " <Gtear screen characters " 

LOO EHDPROC 

This is useful in itself, but what if you want to influents what 

goes on inside the procedure [for example, scroll a message)? 
Simple! You can use variables INSIDE the procedure that are 
used ANYWHERE eLse in the program. If you've used Pascal or 
other structured languages, you will recognise this as meaning 
that what we have is global variables - Turbo Basic has no local 
variable. This means that if, say, your main program uses a 
variable X F then the procedure can use and alter that variable 
too. In Listing 1 F the procedure SCROLL uses the variable G_MES- 
SAGES r which is set in the main program r and it manipulates 
this string to achieve the scrolling effect- You can set G_MES- 
SAGEJ lo whatever text string you pleuse r up to a limit of 255 
characters. 



This freedom, however, leads to a problem. I've been trying to 
describe procedures as being separate entities, independent of 
one another. But, if all variables are available to all procedures, 
it is all too easy to Inadvertantly alter a variable's value some- 
where in your program, not realising that it has affected another 
part. For example, say you have written a procedure that you 
use in many different programs. This procedure uses a variable 
X, which it initialises and changes. This is fine, unless your main 
program or another procedure happens to also use a variable X. 
Then, if you alter it in one place, you alter it everywhere. This 
may or may not be what you want Be warned!! 

I suggest that you use certain names all the time., everywhere, 
for values that you use to control FOR loops, and as temporary 
values, (for example, use variables with single letters, or with 
names such as J LOOP' and 'TEMP'). For all other variables in 
your procedures, adopt some sort of naming convention. A good 
Idea is to use some sort of prefix, If you have a procedure, PLOT, 
which uses its own variables, then you would be better to use 
variable names like PLOT_X and PLOT_Y, rather than X and ¥ , 
Using the underscore (_} in variable names helps to avoid ambi- 
guity. 

Finally, if you wish to pass values from your main program to a 
procedure, use some other convention, I use the prefix G_ in 
listing 1 - the G signifies global, which reminds me that the 
value is being passed from the main prcKjrum. Examine Listing 
1, and you will see that I have used GJvlESSAGEI, as I men- 
tioned earlier. The value of this Is set in the main program, 
before the procedure call, hence the G_ prefix. 

The above is jast an outline - do what you find easiest. 1 
understand that the last bit may seem a bit vague and difficult 
to follow. DON'T WORRY! Experiment for yourself, and you'll 
most likely master the procedure within a few hours of tinkering. 
After ail - it's only a glorified subroutine!! 

TO FINISH OFF 

I've included one program (Listing 1) which sets up a screen and 
border, then scrolls a message until a key is pressed. This is a 
good example of procedure use, as is the other program (Listing 
2) which demonstrates what structuring and use of procedures 
can do for a program. In Listing 2 you might not, and in fact do 
not need to P understand what the actual code IN the procedures 
does, but the procedure names and indenting should help in 
understanding what each bit does, I hope! 

The program is just something I came up with after tinkering for 
a bit with the MOVE command r which I hope to describe in a 
later article. It draws some pretty patterns on the screen, then 
proceeds to scroll the top half upwards, and the bottom half 
downwards. Then various fancy screen fade/wipes are executed, 
before the whole process repeats. You don r l need to understand it 
to make it work, so give it a go. It should give you a good idea of 
what Turbo Basic is capable of. 

UNTIL NEXT TIME 

Well, I guess that about wraps it up for another issue. I hope I 
haven't lost any of you this time round. I try to write as 
informally as 1 can, to keep the articles readable, without getting 
too technical, but I don't know if I succeed or not, I also fear I 
have gone on at too great Length once more. I can see. the Editor 
shaking his head, even as I write [ 

Anyway t write to me if you have any questions, and if you want 
me to cover any particular area in the future. If nobody writes, 
then I don't know what everyone wants, or thinks, so put pen to 
paper. Ill be all too pleased to reply. 

Next time r I'll try to cover some of the new commands available 
in Turbo-Basic, such as those for Graphics, Memory and Arith- 
metic 

Write to me Gordon Cameron, at 13 Muir Bank, Scone, 
Perthshire, PH2 GSZ, SCOT1AND- m 



44 Page 6 - Issue 37 



TURBO BASIC DEMO 



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£150. Telephone: Norwich 0601-633322 
(alter GpmJ. 

XL SYSTEM: SOOXL, 1050 Drtve, XC12 
tw nrrU-r, joystick and 2& original games. 
AIL worth aver £500. Asking £180. Tel: 
Ol -289-5199 

53ASTTM: 1 year old, used far few hours 
only. Also 100 CMrnenl. boxed originnl 
programs* including Powerdrame. Super 
Hang-an, etc, and Puae 6 magazines 
from Issue 2 to 35. Cast new over iZOQO. 
Would OOiisiuer splitting {not maas!). 
Offers Please phone G2&JS-&976ZJ after 
fiprn i.it weekends- and ask for Ray. 

SFLLCH SYNTHESISERS: Pflae $ speech 

synthesiser, ready bail! (uses f/5 ports): 
£20. Maplln Computer speech synthesiser, 
usina whole words stored on ROMS (needs 
S50 interface or parallel I/O port); £ZS. 
1*1, [1502-5*6025. 

XI. 5YSTEM; B00XL, 810 disk drive, cm- 

sette player, AD di§k^ fllL-d wilh games, 
ulililits, ett.. ROMs, tapes, disk boxes, 
30pLu£ maaojtnei, £1 ft a.n.o. Ring Gra- 
hum on 0322-664292. 

XL SVSTEM: 8O0XL, 10.50 D/driv« r 1010 
tj^iinh'i. .()?M printer (Long cable), nvs- 
tick, disk boxes, Mini Offkt II, Atanwritcr 
rluh. T'TiKirnxidi-T, D-DCopiei, D05 2 *i 
Z.5. Turbo Basic, games 011 Cartridge., dliks 
urii.1 1apcs, £250 o.n.o. E.Morton, Si Hat. 
field Gardens, West Monk»™iun, Whitley 
&uy. Tynt & Wear NE25 PQF. 

XL SYSTEM: 8O0XL 1050 disk drive-, 
Pfionemark Tecordec., various soltware on 
disk and tape. CI 20. Tel: Caernarfon 
(02S^J m£ 



8 BIT CLEAROUt; XCll Dusl OOVtt, 
tl.5D; Music Maker (cartridge}, £5.00; 
Pilot Lanquaae (cartrti^yej, £5.00; Macro 
Assembler (disk}, £30.00, Eastern Front 
(cassette}, £2.00; Cofiwrsananal French 
(Curette). £3.00: Trivial Puisalt (dlsVj, 
££.00. Ait wflwore tltftt art originals. 
Phone Dave on Cardiff (0222) H216Z? 
Monday - Friday <9.00am - 5.00pm} or 
Cardiff (0222J 5$fi4-l0 eveninys and 
weekends. 

XL SYSTEM: BOOXL, LOiO dist drive, 41 D 
tape deck, lots of softWQr* t>n cassette and 
disk, loads of magazines, hlank disks, 
joysticks, hook* c:md locking dis-k box. Sell 
for jusl £170 (including carriage hy neKt- 
day coaner! !j. I'hojif McuJt Wayman on 
0422-330573 between 9am and ?j?rn or 
on CM 2^ ft3^Z3« at any other time. 

XL SYSTEM? 80QXL, XCI2 cosserfe r 1050 
piinter/plortei plui ft spajK rolls of paper, 
12 cassette games plus joystick. £12X1. 
Buyer mast colled. Tel {05435) 50% 

XI. SVSTLM; &00KL. 1050 disk drive, 
1010 recorder, joyrtLck, lots of tapes and 
disks Olid 2 cartndges (all original) and in 
good condition. £140. Tel 0l*»*4-435B. 

STSYSTEM;520S1IM 1 mouse. juy^LLcfc, 
14 w.illw[i re disks. Little used, hargaln 
£22.S. Speech synlhesisor I'ltmi Page 6 
issae 19, £10; Numeric keypad from Alari 
User Octol^r 1^66, £8. Compute! books 
'Mapping the Atari" and 'Atari GaLLtCtSofl 
Vol. r, tio Iru. 1 two. Mactionics pnnter 
Interface for Atari *00, £S. fftll: RrchckiJe 
(07[>?K*0244, 

SI SYSTEM: 5205TFM plus 1Mb Drive, 
mouse, Fast &asJc, Comp Pn> |;i1ick, 
Purtgpxmmaster, F-Type plus lots erf other 
aames, PD staff, Eaoaciilnw. boxed (cos! 
C5Q0pJus). Sell for £J0O o.n.o. Rl no ]ame* 
an 0d&l}-62O-4OS3 after 6pm. 

XE SVSl EM: 130 XL plus 3050 Dlik 
Drive. Mac fiS, Action f pins Io*:ilki1, Mini 
Of Ik i- 2 plus manuals,, games, all Atari 
User Maa*. plus some Pogt- 6 and Monitor 
mogi, Kuviswd Mapping the Atari, lark^ 
able Disk boy plus m disks und ioysuck. 
txcellcni condition with boxes. £.T5D. Tel 
0352ei-5Afi7 aftei fipni- 

XL SYSTEM^ 80GXL 1050 Disk Dri^e, 
102? Prinler, Philips BM7S02 grwn Muni- 
tor, white computer desk, lockablc -.1:sk 
box. All boxed, plas prLnter stand, soft- 
ware and disks. L2BQ o.n.o. Tel. 
Ql-517-B39fi 

SF354 DRIVE: 1 ft nm§ fin 5T including 
widl ui^r £100 of original somware. £fiO 
o.n.o. Telephone Kevin un (061H42-^79l. 

XL SYSTEM: 300X1, 1050 Drive fitted 
wiih U.S. doubter, XC12 data recorder , 
£50 Interface, 1020 printer/plotter, 822 
thermal printer, loach tablet phis Atari 
ijilisl (ufl ridge. 100's of disk games, 
books., maaazjnes and disk uuko, £400 
0-n.O. WjJ] split some items. Phane 

XL SYSl t.M: K00XL, 105O disk drive, 
1010 cassette recorder, manv disks und 
cassettes, 2 p&y&Lkks. All in excellent con- 
dition. Also many issues of Atari Usee. 
mxuiuals und books, worth over £400] will 
sell for £250 o.n.o. Tel. Film AlfrW after 
A pm . 

MODEM; V21, V22, 300 and 1200 baud. 

Full and half duple*, £75. Datari interface 
with software, £30arboth for tiff), ROM 
Emulaicji- pl^s wftwore and Instructions, 
£7.50. Books and maa*:j/.i in ■■ !<■! 
0-1 J:i-H7?53-i after 6pm or weekends. 

MEMORY UPGRADE: 256K upoTade for 
300XL. Includes R k 15& Drams, Decoder, 
C hi[> Sutkcls, full fittina instructlans and 
software. Modified LX^S 2.5 ojits slnqle 
density virtual drives D7 & 5a. £50. Tel. 
042iue? Q 5 33 after Opm or weekends. 

XL SVSTEM; 130XE und 1010 recorder 
£50. Original lopes: Tomahawk, Calours- 
rjH^ce and StiarW Odyssey, £2.00 each. 
Books: 'RevLwdMappjng the Atari . 
"SOOKL and &eyonef r , £5.00 each o.n.o. 
Tel. {0507.5 $05244 

1029 PRINTER; AS new, testd with 
paper and software, £125. Phone DaiPBO 
on (0621 J 7fi2^^& evenings pkase. 

XL SYS1CM: J^OOXL, 1050 disk drive, 
boxed with over 40 public domain disks. 
Buyw must COlleel, £115. Tel. 
09^2-592653 (Najelncj) after 5pm. 



1029 PRINTED Complete with Font IV 
eharuAlcr thip, £E0 o.n.o. Tel. Robert on: 
01-^63-2&47 after 5pm. 

MONITOR: Ix'iw Kes EOuflitOr polled), 
1050 disk drive, XCll tape recorder with 
assortment of cussellci.SpaitaDos Rome 
clock. Atari Microsoft basic II, MAt/*5. all 
are GOrlridgts wish manuals. Two books 
Assembly Language Froyrumminy Foe the 
.Miiri >:Murb Cnasin>ana Machme t.an« 
guaae For Beolnners (Hichard Mansfield), 
ull lor £150 o.n.o. Will split or any reason- 
able offer cotwidered, Phone 02o9-7*3725 



WANTED 



PROGRAMS; Disk copy of the two prog- 
rams 'Alpha' and 'HexjKlt (up ancfran- 
nin-y) irom the book Atari 130SE machine 
Lanauaqe far the Al,isoluk 15e_ujnner r . Disk 
supped. Ring Hany on (07 Eft -i7:mfi 

PAGE 6; Issue 1 wanted. Phone An:lv oh 
0264 7ftl9«fj 

UJ\K I J Kf VI /PRINTER: 1050orXF551 
dls-k drive in running order, tpsan oc any 
conipulible dot matrix printer wilh or 
without interface. Will tolled anvwhere in 
the North West. Ring Gwen on Oft 1 2\il 
5150 

lUSlJ t>l%-K PR1VE/FRINTER: 1050 dink 
drii r e (standard or enh<jji< i-di. AIsli Epson 
compatible dot matrix printer with Atari 
printer cable if possible. Please call Kevin 
with DfUe and particulars on OXFORD 
1-0865)711091 

XL STARTER^ SOO XL and COSHlti wan- 

tfil id enable us (o get started - ours is 
cubbish! - aLso an original instruction 
IkhjJc. as ours is missing. ROMs anil s« >n 
ware to suit younu; usee also welcome. 
Please telephone with price jequSred lu 
Nlct Mills i;0B677> 2M&. 

% I A1JVF.NTURE5: Sierra On-Une ongin- 
als:- Space Quest 1 i-i '2. \\t\\w Quest l v 
I -i-i* uTe Suit Luny in the Land of the 
Lounge- IJaards, XlbKed-Up Mother Goose 
ujid rjluck Cauldron, Packaging un impor- 
tant but MUST be orlglno! games with lull 
doCUcnenlullon. Please write, statina price 
and postage costs reauired to; ]ohn K. 
&arnsley. 32 Merrivale Road, Risina 
Riook, Stafford, STl 7 91113. ENGLAND. 

I'HIM KR: Atari 1020, 1027 or 1029 in 
aood condition - mint be capable of print- 
siingmphici. Preferably with manual. 
Telephone: Mr.T. Paine on rknunor Reads 
(Cfjfl* 0243>-622231 

PHINTTR; Atari 1027 or 1029 with softs 
ware. Write lo: "Mark t'enw^k, 29 Conway 
Streel, Long Eaton. NoHinanam. hIGlO 
2AF. 

CASSETTE DECK; 1010, XC or Phone- 
mark. Also manual far Epson LX&), 
Machine Language 2nd book and De Re 
Atari. Phone Stev* feMord [0952) SI 8950. 

SUPER 31 J PI.C11 JER 3: Help! Does any- 
one oul there hove a copy {ortglnaL) of 
Super 3D Plotter 2. by Ck-tnon Software. If 
i«j contact Steve Holmes, 5 ^"hltmore Ave- 
nue, Crassinoor. c:hesteriicld542 5A£. 
(Will pay up to £20 oi swap for Mopping 
The Atari - revised -edition). 

SUPLRSCRIPTr word processor and 
manual In aood Order. Phone; 
021-1 3.-6 IB J any time. 

XL SVSTEM: SO0XL and HMD drive in 
exchona^ for my Commodore C64. data- 
corder, software, manuals,, e^c I will col- 
lect if in NX. Enolandi'Scotland area. 
Phone Steve on 0S73-256fiO. 

DISK DRIVE; 1050, Alarl &umc RcL 

S ! i ; n 1 1 . 1 1 V; i .,- ,.\ | : | r i. . impilter M..i:'i . ji ; I , 

kttni Office ll r plug other buiiness/en- 
uineerina tonmus, Phone Krackley 
(02aO)-?u^H.-l^, duv ut evening. 



PEN PALS/HELP | 



PEN PALS- I would like lo hear from 
other 8 bit usees around the world, \ have 
a 130XF:, iwi> 1050 disk drives, XEPfiO, 1 1n- 
new Diamond GOF^ 5T jnr {Graphic Oper- 
ating, environment on cartridge - looks 
and acts like GEM on the SD.Write or 
I-:. -Tie. GuiLlermo Martinez, 241 Nt25th 
Street, Miami, Honda 33137, U.S.A. Tel. 
<3D5) 576-89^5 

ADVEHTURL HELP: Can cuiyCM idl me 

how to aet jiast thi puitcullis and the 
trabi in The Golden Baton (Adrtntuft 
Internal Ion a !>?? Please write to: Tim Her- 
man, 25 Prince Edward Rood r &llk L ricay> 
l.^.'K, c;m II 2KB -M- ring (0277) 651029. 

XL/At OWNERS: Contact wanted from 
any S-hit owners anywhere, to exchange 
hinW^'ps. All letters answered. Write to: 
Mick AllsoPr 9 Markhouse Avenue P Wallh. 
amstow. LONDON El 7 ftk¥. Tel 

SIERRA ON- LINERS!! Anyone, any oa*, 
anywheie in the world to hetp me set up a 
nationwide/worldwide Sierra On-line 
Adventure Players Group. Please send 
your ideas, suggestions, interests and Lom- 
ments to: John R. oarnsley, 32 Merrivale 
Koad. Rising Brook, Stafford, Staffs, 5T1 7 
9ER. ENOLAKD. 

!tl PENPALS; Hi! To all Atan asers. I m 
fulie (29yrs> and I've lust become the 
proud owner oE a 520STFM. I need help 
getting started and I'm interested in 
graphic aft databases ana just wnilng 
letters, so come on! All letters will be 
answered promptlv, U.K. or abroad. Wn1e 
to: Julie, 140 Malvern Crescent, Darling- 
ton. Co-Durham, DL3 9UN. 

TESLTPRO: I would like ta heur from Te\- 
tpro users. Beginners or experienced users, 
problems or hints and tips, Let me- know, 
write to Steve Holmes-Brown, 23 Pool 
Close, Trench. Telford, Shropshire TF2 
6C:/ 

XL USER; My name is David. I haw ^jm 
800XL, 1050 disk drive. 1010 tape unit 
and a 1029 printer. I am interested in all 
types of software. adTOIYturtt, accade 
aumea, etc., all Lettecs answered^ Write lu: 
David FaaaLn, 49 lohnson Stree? r Lower 
Hopton, Knrfield, West Yorkshire. WF14 
ftPO- 

ST PENPALS; If you are interested pleose 
write to Daniel Rates, ft Birches Close, 
Selsey P West Sussex. P020 9EP. 

LOCO/LISP USERS: Anyone wha can 
help a lieal nner please, I have some U.S. 
pnwjrum literature as a guide. Contact; 
|im Cutler, 44 Water 5lrcct, Great Har- 
w.xid. Lanes. BB6 7QR. 

ATARI PENPALS: My name is Ole Ger- 
de.n r [-"m 16.. male, and am looking for 
olhei computing :'uris n:. write to in Great 
Hrikjjn, 1 would, verj- much like to do on 
exchnncje to Britain to improve my En- 

tlish and leom more ahout com pu tiny in 
mam, :=-!..■. is; wrile (in Inallsh!) to: Ole 
Gerden, Structsdamm % 2H90 FIdN5- 
BURft, West Germany. 

XL PENPALS: I have recently acojulred a 
lOSO Disk drive with i :■■-.■: : nfiunecment 
for my tf P0XL and would like any infor- 
mation an Laser software. Write to: Alan 
ttruUun, 25 Stevenson Street, North- 
ampton, "I%1N4 yi a F or phone: 
<06X)4}-7632IQ. 

XL CONTACTS: I am an B-ail cassette 
user and I would like to hear from anyone 
who owns the A00XL and oasscttt svstem 
to exc.h<jnyL' hints, Lips and news. 1 r\QV* 
got quite a ooad collection of budaet 
ucjniL-synd urn interested in adventures. 
Please write to: Damn Moloney, 5* Dis- 
raeli Road. Forest Gate. London r:7 9[1 , 
ENGLAND. 



COM ACT is FREE of charge and mm bej usc*l by any genuine 
Atori rnthu^iast for contacting olher owners Any notice may 
br iniluiltti except those offerinu %t?flvkur^ only tor sole t>r 
e\f.huntjt> cir those offering items far xuU> cximmercially. The 
Editor rt^i^rvvN the right to omit any nut ice received at his 
discretion. 

Send your CONTACT notice to CONTACT, PACE *. P r O, Box 54, 
Stafford. M lb H>R, Please write yuur notice on a separate 
sheet tif pupir, not as part of a letter. 



46 Page 6 - Issue 37 



^^—*mmtm 



8-BIT GAMES ... 8-BIT GAMES ... 8-BIT GAMES 



PUT THE RACING GLOVES ON 



It's arrived!! initially advertised in late 
1987, Red Rats SPEED RUN r billed as the 
most realistic roily game on four wheels, 
has finally been released on the Atari B bit. 

Unlike previous race simulations, this one 
features a 'behind the driver' view from 
inside a Sierra Cosworth rally car. This 
display is most impressive, with meticu- 
lous care having been taken to re-create 
the car's interior and dashboard. To the 
right, the driver is seen to steer and change 
gear, smoothly and realistically, as you 
issue commands via the joystick. Through 
the windscreen, a familiar grey track with 
red and white kerb stones twists into the 
distance, with a backdrop of countrywide 
and occasional track-side hoardings, 
Sound isn't quite so spectacular but Red 
Rat have included an audio tape in the 
package for you to^play in your hi-fi while 



Title: SPEED RUN 
Publisher: Red Rot 
Price: £8.95 c«tt&/£12,95 disk 
Players: 1 
Control: Joystick 




Budget priced software has traditionally 
been produced In cassette-only format and 
this has left a sizeable* number of disk 
drive owners feeling dejected and forgot- 
ten. If you are one of them, you'll be 
pleased to learn that Players have taken 
the initiative and re-released two of their 
budget cassette titles - BUBBLE TROUBLE 
and EXCELSOR - as a disk based Zap-Pak\ 

Original ideas are few and far between 
nowadays but BUBBLE TROUBLE is quite 
unlike any other game on the market. For 
a start, it's set in a bath tub where you 
assume the coveted role of a brave bubble 
(ye& ( a bubble!) who is eager to escape 
from the dangers lurking within! The aim 
is to collect a number of smaller bubbles 
enabling you to float to safety, whilst 
avoiding a multitude of vicious bathroom 
accessories from a plastic duck to a fear- 
some nail brush which are all out to burst 
you! Extra points are obtained by eating 




you try out the game. 

From the main title screen you can select 
automatic: or manual gearchange mode. 
Automatic is recommended for beginners 
whilst manual mode will give those expert 
drivers a real run for their money as they 
grapple with the Sierras 5-speed Gelrag 
gearbox. Keeping on the circuit may seem 
rhullcnge enough though as the car slides 
violently through each corner. Observing 
the track through the windscreen doesn't 
really give much of a clue as to your 
position, and an indicator just below the 
rear view mirror is therefore provided as 
an alternative. Don't get too near the edge 
or you'll crash and have to wait several 
seconds for the car to be repaired! Crash 



once too often and your car is disqualified 
from the rally. Disk owners get an addi- 
tional bonus in the form of a workshop 
menu, from which they are able to select 
either extra tyre grip, fuel injection or a 
super-efficient repair crew. The latter op- 
tion is perhaps the most useful as the 
delay encountered can otherwise become 
rather frustrating, 

Certain aspects of the game are a little 
disappointing. For example, there is no 
indication of your progress in the race and 
the game simply stops when you have 
travelled the required distance without any 
prior warning. There only appears to be 
one circuit, and after a few goes you begin 
to long for a bit more variety. There also 
seems to be a problem - at least with the 
disk version - which sometimes causes cor- 
ruption at the top of the screen, detracting 
somewhat from the otherwise brilliant 
graphics. Presumably the amount of mem- 
ory needed to produce that incredible cock- 
pit view meant that sacrifices had to be 
made in other departments. 

Despite a few problems, SPEED RUN is still 
an essentia] component of any software 
collection, if only because it illustrates the 
superb graphic capabilities of the Atari. If 
you're willing to persevere with manual 
gearchange mode then the game should 
also bring you hours of enjoyment. In- 
novative stuff, as usual, from Red Rat. 

Paul Rixon 



ITS OLD BUT IFS A BARGAIN! 



bars of soap {not a diet Td fancy!) but 

speed is of the essence as each level has a 
strict time limit imposed. 

Graphics have been tastefully devised in 
a humorous fashion to coincide with the 
bathroom theme. For example, the play 
area - or bath -fills up with water from an 
overhead tap which empties through the 
plug hole when your lives are diminished. 
Adequate sound, lots of colour and some 
pleasant special effects add up to make a 
simple but addictive game that is sure to 
appeal to younger Atarians. 

EXCELSOR has been programmed by the 
same author as BUBBLE TROUBLE and it 
shows in the distinctive rainbow shading 
technique used to create a colourful dis- 
play, No bath tubs here though - the year 
is 2136 and the discovery of molecular 
travel has finally put a miraculous stop to 
Britain's traffic problems. No more 
queuing up on the Ml, now you can travel 
anywhere in a matter of seconds! Unfor- 
tunately, Alien forces are at work and 
they've developed a method of capturing 
human souls during the transportation 
process, suspending them in pure Nexus 
energy as 'Soul stars'. As one of the few 
remaining humane you must don your 



F.xcelsor Prototype fetpack and attempt to 
free the souls before the Aliens capture 
yours! 

It's not a bad story, as excuses for shoot 
'em ups go, and you'll have realised by 
now that each level in the game is essen- 
tially a case of collecting a set number of 
soul stars whilst avoiding, or eliminating, 
the Aliens and other static nasties that 
serve to hinder your progress. Plenty of fast 
action is assured and some good visual 
and sonic effects are included for good 
measure. EXCELSOR is certainly one of the 
better budget games currently available. 

Full marks to Players for showing some 
understanding and letting disk owners get 
a taste of the bargains for a change. 
Budget priced disks are something Id like 
to see a lot more of. Other companies take 
note! 

Paul Rixon 



Title: Zap-Pak 
Publisher; Players 
Price; £4.95 on disk 
Players: 1 
Control: Joystick 



Page 6 Issue 37 47 



8-BIT GAMES ... 8-BIT GAMES ... 8-BIT GAMES - 8- 



BUT DON'T PUNCH THE REF! 



Of qll the sports In existence, football has 
got to be one of the hardest to computer- 
ize. ]ust how can you simulate a team 
confrontation involving twenty-two play- 
ers with only one or two joysticks? Not 
very realistically is the truthful answer to 
that one, and for this reason most of the 
football games released in the past have 
simulated the managerial aspects ratber 
than the sport itself. Thorn EMI were tbe 
first to have a go at something different 
with a cracking little game called, some- 
what uninspiringly r Soccer ond Tynesoft 
recently added their contribution in the 
form of EUROPEAN SUPER SOCCER. So 
how does it measure up? 

SUPER SOCCER opens up with a well- 
designed title sequence, complete with an 
appropriate musical accompaniment. One 
or two player mode is selected at this stage- 
by a press of the OPTION key. Von are 



Title: EUROPEAN SUPER 

SOCCER 
Publisher: Tynesoft 

Price: £8.95 co$$ 9 f£12$5 disk 
Players: 1/2 with joystick (s) 



next required to select your team national- 
ity from a choice of six alternatives by 
positioning a cursor over the flag of the 
desired country. An opposing team is then 
randomly appointed. In fact, it doesn't 
really seem to make much difference 
which country you select, as the team col- 
ours do not feature in the game thereafter 
and subsequent reference to either side is 
simply made by specifying 'home -1 or 
"away". Once the selection procedure is 
complete, the players emerge onto the 
pitch., a whistle sounds and a timer starts 
counting downwards for the first half of 
play. In the background, an atmospheric 
hiss of the crowd is heard which later 
increases in volume when a goal appears 
imminent. 

The pitch scrolls horizontally over about 
three screen widths in a rather jerky man- 
ner. Each team's players - distinguished by 
their contrasting dark and light shirts - are 
quite large in size r and although this ini- 
tially seems attractive it is clearly delivered 
at the expense of playing speed. A white 
square around a player's body indicates 
that he is the one currently under joystick 
command. This may change if another 
player of the same side happens to be in 




the path of an oncoming ball. Unfortun- 
ately, some of the computer-controlled 
players on your team seem less than com- 
mitted to seeing their side win, and can 
sometimes hinder rather than help your 
progress! When an opposing player 
approaches your goal, a press of the fire 
button sends the goal keeper into a fear- 
less dive ■ not always in the right direction 
but occasionally making a save! Corners, 
knock-ins and goal kicks are automatic, A$ 
for headers, there aren't any as the hall 
seldom travels higher than chest height I 
For a one player match, EMl's Soccer is, 
in my opinion, imminently more playable 
than the Tynesoft game but for two play- 
ers, SUPER SOCCER would appear to be a 
worthwhile alternative. If you're tired of 
staring at league tables and want a slice 
of the real action, this is probably the ideal 
game for you, 

Paul Rixon 



UP ABOVE THE EARTH SO HIGH 



STRATOSPHERE is r in effect, the sequel to 
Excelsor which Is reviewed elsewhere in 
this issue According to the plot, it's five 
yeans on and the battle to save humanity 
from an Alien invasion has almost been 
won. Note the 'almost 1 - due entirely to a 
number of hyperspatlal Motherships that 
have somehow survived the previous en~ 
counter and are now menacingly orbiting 
the Earth, And guess whos ]ob it is to get 
up there and finish them off, once and for 
all?! This time you abandon the Excclsor 
prototype jetpack and head for the stars in 
a craft described as a J sleek bi-wing 
fighter 1 . 

The Motherships are protected by layers of 
spherical shielding, and you are expected 
to break these down by repeatedly firing 
missiles at them. Avoiding the deadly 
'soul-suckers' on patrol in the vicinity is an 
added complication. The action takes 
place on a single screen - there isn't any 
scrolling as your craft simply wraps 
around if you steer it across a screen 
boundary. A Mothership is located in the 
centre of the playfield, surrounded by 
three rings of shielding ond various static 
obstacles which together turn the game 
into a sort of inter-galactic pin-ball 
machine! In some ways the graphics are 




reminiscent of First Star's excellent Astro- 
Chase, but the much acclaimed rainbow 
colouring technique has been over-used in 
an attempt to disguise an otherwise 
rudimentary screen construction, 

Your ship is poorly defined, mono col- 
oured and travels rather quickly relative to 
the size of the play area. It can move in 
all eight joystick directions - an ability that 
can quickly lead to utter confusion, espe- 
cially in such a small arena. It's not made 
any easier by the ship's irritating habit of 
becoming stuck between the obstacles! Eli- 
minating those pursuing nasties is certain- 
ly not the effortless job It seems at first! 
Once the shielding has been successfully 
disposed of, the mothership is quickly eli- 



minated and the preceding level of play 
begins, The screen designs differ through- 
out the levels but the underlying task re- 
mains identical. 

STRATOSPHERE is an extremely simple 
game and I'm afraid the content is just 
insufficient to maintain a player's interest 
for any length of time. Payability is a 
most important quantity for an arcade 
game and on this occasion 1 could sense 
no power of addiction willing me to have 
'just one more go r . Players have produced 
some top quality software for the Atari in 
the post and have more lined up for the 
future so I guess this momentary lapse of 
standards shouldn't be viewed too harshly. 
Best give this one a miss and see what the 
next offerings are like. 

For those who are interested, nonetheless, 
the game is also available on a disk based 
'Zap-Fak 2 J at £4,95, It is paired with 
Dizzy Dice, a fruit machine simulation 
that was reviewed fully in PAGE 6 issue 31. 

Paul Rixon 



Title: STRATOSPHERE 
Publisher: Players 
Price: £1.99 on cassette 
Players: 1 
Control: Joystick 



Page 6 Isive 3 7 



*mmmmmmmmm 



III 



8-BIT GAMES ... 8-BIT GAMES ... 8-BIT GAMES 



in 



UNDERWATER ESCAPADES 



When you've jumped a thousand plat- 
forms, annihilated countless Aliens and 
piloted innumerable helicopter gun ships 
through ihe evil tyrant's fortress, the arriv- 
al of a new £1 .99 arcade game tends to be 
greeted with less than an outburst of en- 
thusiasm. Let's face it - these budget J jobs' 
are all much of a muchness aren't they? 
Well thats what I thought until [started 
ploying PERISCOPE UP. Little did I know 
that it would turn out to be Atlantis Soft- 
wares best release to date. 

Why? Graphically the game is unlikely to 
raise any eyebrows, sound is of the famil- 
iar uninspiring nature synonymous with 
software of this type and the concept is 
anything but original But what it does 
have, most importantly perhaps, is that 
one essential ingredient that can make or 
break any arcade game - addictiveness. 




Title: PERISCOPE UP 
Publisher: Atlantis Software 
Price: £1.99 on cassette 
Players: 1 
Control: Joystick 



Put simply, you 1 1 always want Just one 
more go', even if the thing frustrates you 
or your favourite TV serial is just starting. 
For those who keep track of twenty first 
century predictions, as concocted by the 
staff writers at Atlantis, it's now the year 
2007 and disaster looks imminent as Bri- 
tain's VAX 3000 Super Defence Computer 
has malfunctioned (obviously not an Atari 
model"). Consequently, hundreds of nuc- 
lear missiles could be launched across the 
world, triggering global thermo-nuclear 
war. Being a crucial element of the na- 
tion's defence, the VAX 3000 is heavily 
protected against infiltration and the only 
way for you to save the day r it seems, is 
by traversing the miles of underwater ac- 



cess tunnels remaining from the time of its 
construction. All you've got to do is to 
navigate the underground passages in 
your submarine, locate and destroy six 
reactor pods and collect eight digits of a 
pusscode which will eventually shut down 
the computer. 

There are certain similarities with master- 
Lronic's Powerdown here as the tunnels are 
frequently blocked by doors and laser 
gates which must be skilfully dodged or 
opened using numbered keys accumulated 
en route. There are various other obstacles 
too and any contact with these or the 
surrounding walls is naturally fatal. All 
this and you may forget to keep an eye on 
the fuel tanks, but don't because the result 
is equally catastrophic. Joystick controls 
are simple but slightly unusual in that a 
press of the trigger passes command over 
to a small scout craft which is used for the 
collecting of articles and for shooting at 
the reactor pods. The submarine is unable 
to perform either of these tasks but the 
scout can only move within the bound- 
aries of the current screen, There are three 
scouts allocated to each submarine and 
two submarines in reserve. A fair provision 
of extra lives in my opinion. 

At first glance it seemed like PERISCOPE 
UP would be just another of those tedious 
cavern games but experience has proved 
otherwise, 

Paul RlxQn 




HENRY THE LOONY LEAPER 



Alternative Software have a habit of re- 
releasing old Atari software from a variety 
of different companies, but this time 
they've obtained a game that hasn't 
actually reached the shelves before, LEAPS- 
TER was originally intended to be a full- 
priced Red Rat publication, but for one 
reason or another, never quite made it. 

In the game you play the part of school- 
boy Henry Leapster, whose quest is a 
strange, but straightforward one - to get to 
school on time! Unfortunately the authors 
of the game were unable to dream up a 
suitable plot so you've just got to accept 
that this journey involves travelling 
through a missile base and a grave yard! 
For reasons unknown, Henry can r t prog- 
ress from one location to the next without 
first collecting a certain number of objects 
such as suitcases, keys and multicoloured 
question marks!??). These are located in 
suitably inaccessible places such that 



Henry must jump onto other objects - most 
notably cars travelling along the high 
street - to reach them. Accurate timing is 
a necessity as Henry can easily get flat- 
tened by the passing vehicles, and he must 
also avoid missiles, troops and Zombies 
among various other adversaries that you 
certainly won't recall from your school 
years. There's a time limit to each screen 
too - presumably the headmaster is in hot 
pursuit with his cane! 

Music on the title screen is quite pleasant 
but this continues into the game at a 
rnuch slower pace, the ability to turn it off 
therefore being much appreciated. 
Graphics are quite good - the vehicles 
especially so, being recognisable models - 
although the background colouring did 
bring back long * forgotten memories of 
Who Dares Wins 11 (i.e. lots of brown!). 
Henry himself is quite nicely animated 
and responds quickly to the joystick. 

Apart from the ludicrous plot, my only 
major criticism concerns the lack of any 
status information. For instance, we're not 
informed on the title screen whether the 
music is currently switched on or off, de- 
spite the necessity to select the desired 
state before the game itself commences, 



and there is also no indication of the num- 
ber of objects required to complete each 
screen. This makes it necessary to re- 
peatedly move Henry towards the right 
hand edge of the playfield to see whether 
the next location will then scroll in. As the 
vehicles also appear from this side of the 
display, the procedure does have potential- 
ly disastrous consequences! 
Overall it's not hard to see why Red Rat 
had second thoughts about adding LEAPS- 
TER to their range but in this revised 
budget format from Alternative Software 
it's got to be worth the effort. Alternative 
is perhaps the operative word as there 
arent many other games quite like this 
one! 

Paul Rixon 



Title; LEAPSTER 
Publisher: Alternative 
Price: £1,99 on cassette 
Players: 1 
Control: Joystick 



Page 6 Issue 37 49 



MAKE YOUR ATARI HAPPY! 

Get some back issues NOW! 



PAGE G back. Issues represent an excel Ien1 way qI Increasing Ihe enjoyment of 
yaur Atari wilh articles to enlighten you. programs 1o type in and reviews ot 
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ISSUE 21 - A packed issue wilh games. TRAIN CRAZY. REVENGER and FORKLIFT. 
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ISSUE 2$ - Another biggie! A must for lo29 printer owners with 3 great utilities 
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DISK AVAILABLE - DOUBLE SIDED! TWO lull SWfcS 
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ISSUE 27 - Some- tracking li stings for the B-bit. In GREAT BRITAIN LTD. you can 
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version of backgammon and there's ANTS IN YOUR PAWTB i DISK COMMAND and 
others. There is a leature on word processing and stacks of reviews. The ST 
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DISK AVAILABLE - some L-O-N-G LISTINGS! 





ISSUE 28 - Exlend Ine incredible original Munch y Madness wilh the MUNCHY 
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o1 reviews. For ST users. 1he tirsl in a series of USING GEM Irom C plus FLIGHT 
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DISK AVAILABLE - Also contains Ihe winning title 
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ISSUE 29 - One 1hat serious 9-bit users have been walling a long time lor - a great 
lull leature database - MJD BASE plus an amazing story maker, STORYBOOK, that 
allows you to create illustrated slories. Then 1 here's a great game Irom ANTIC 
called CLIFF HANGER and an ALJTOHUN maker and more. Cheat on commercial 
games with ZAPPING THE RIGHT BYTE and read slacks ol reviews. The ST 
section has a lype-ln program, SCREEN OR A6BER, which allpws you 10 snatch' 
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DISK AVAILABLE. DOUBLE SIDED. Wilh BONUS 

iiory lor storybook and storybook ruder. 

ISSUE 3Q - A grftal fallow up to solid Modelling allows you to animate 3-D objects. 
Try 3-D ANIMATOR. How about a puizfe with LETTER CASTLE or en arcade style 

shoal-up Trom ANTIC called DESEHT CHASE? Articles mlcudc an in-depth look 
at GUNSLINCER, Gcncuioqy With Your Atari arid First Steps on saving screens, 
Leads ol reviews including AfJTODUEL and P;R: CONNECTION. The ST seclion 
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end a chaltenging game called BOWL TRAP. A feature on SSI. more Tutorial 
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2000 and THE DUNGEON plus many more are also in this issue. ST SECRETS, 
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seetlon incl udes IM G SCAN, BASE TWO. TEMPUS and many more. 

DISK AVAILABLE - All the e*1ra liles lor ORDINAL 
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machine language arcade game. Olher type-in listings include another game, 
CRYSTAL CRJS1S and two utilities, COLOUR TUNER and SOFTKEY. the latter 
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850 SPLrr reveals secrete about Ihe 950 interface. DESIGNER KEYS allows you 
to customise the keyboard. Then Wiere's BEGINNER'S BASIC plus ii new series 
on TURBO BASIC, re-views ol MERAK, Draconus, Joe Blade and more, For the 
ST we have B BOOT to allow you to boot Irom drive B. STOS reviewed, TRIP- 
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SACK ISSUES are £1.20 &ach In Ihe U.K.., £1.95 far Europe or surface mail elsewhere and £2.75 far Air Mail outside Europe 

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SO 



t'ucjtf 6 - Issut- .17 



The 



ST 

FILE 



Do you want to be a 

HERO? 

Two new Fantasy Role 

Playing games compared 

see pages 68 and 69 



SKY FOX I J from 
Flertronics Arts 




ST NEWS 



FERRARI FORMULA ONE gaining chum 
pi unship points 



Electronic Arts are getting busy again with FERRARI FORMULA ONE scorching its way around all 16 circuits of the 1986 
Grand Prix season with driving and strategy based on actual event.* of the 1986 season you can thrash Ayr ton Senna 
for just £24.95, Up in the air, EA have SKYFOX II also at £24.95 with a new plot, enhanced graphic animation, better 
sounds faster at t ion and a more realistic sensation of flying (that's what the press release says!), can you afford to miss 
it? 3D FOOL from Firebird at £19.99 looks interesting with the ability to actually walk around 1 f he table and take shots 
from different positions and featuring 'Maltese' foe Barbara who apparently is a real person and European Pool Champion 
to boot! feff Winter is back and blasting with ANDES ATTACK full of frenetic action^ fast, colourful and only slightly weird 
bat guaranteed to leave you senseless and all for just £9 SSI The man reckons £20 fur a game that takes a relatively 
short time to write is a rip off so Llamasaft blasts in at a more realistic price, pity a few others don't think (and do) 
likewise ... CRIDRVWER is caming next. Cascade have ■ P.JV.A, li'AIi/tfOJf where you pilot a micrasuhmcrsihle through the 
blood stream to stop the erratic growth of a second brain (yuckf) t it says the price is £19.96 (every penny counts}. The 
ultimate pinball game is TIMESCAWER from Electric Dreams far £19.99 with (ho levels to each level and each level 
only accessible from a time tunnel on the previous level (or was that three levels with ...?). From Activision comes REAL 
GHOSTBVSTERS at £19.99 and \f ILLINIUM 2.2, a strategy game set in the year 2200 with tactical strategy, arcade type 
JD action and puzzle solving with graphics of "sheer beauty*. Announced as 'coming soon' is GOLD RUSH from Sierra, 
not announced (amid continuing rumours that intbcom is pulling out of the ST mar her) is ZORK ZERO. Finally, close 
the page a hit. nobody looking? Okay, fancy some Hardcore Software? Oh, its only a MIDI program and that's the name 
of the company. Still, if you are into music you can get DATA DVMPER for the Kawai Kl synthesizer for £29.95 with 
a version for the Casio CZ and Yamaha VK series to follow* 



REVIEW 



Protext . . . 



Serious word processor's do it without GEM 



In the world of the ST word processor, Protect is different. 
You con tell as soon as you load it up - white text on a black 
background. Clearer and more relaxing, 1 thought, especial- 
ly on a TV, hut this, and just about every other default setting 
Imaginable can be changed to suit your own needs and tempera- 
ment if yoa don't happen to like U. 

The next thing you notice, with a slight burst of panic, is that 
(he program is sitting there waiting for you to TYPE IN a 
command. Yes, really. No menus, no windows., just like the way 
our great grandfathers did it. At first, this is a bit daunting, since 
you have to learn the commands and enter them in a command 
area, and then you can even take another memory test by 
learning the combinations of key presses that let you access the 
commands directly. It looks like you might have to read the 
manual after all Amor are very understanding about this. In 
their own words, "manuals are items that come with programs, 
are intended to be used to prop the keyboard at a better angle 
and are only to be read when all else fails!\ Realizing this, they 
have tried to make their 4 cm thick offering as readable and 
useful as possible, and generally they've done a very good job 
with it, pointing the user to the sections which demonstrate how 
to make use of the program before trying to impress him with 
some of the more esoteric functions., The tutorial documents 
supplied on disk are similarly well thought-out, being simple 
without giving the impression that you must have recently had a 
lobotomy. If you spend half an hour or so with the tutorials, 
you 11 be in a position to use the most basic parts of Protext, with 
help available on-screen to prompt your memory. 

THE FASTEST AROUND? 

The point of all these typed-in commands is that by using them, 
GEM can be bypassed. Now GEM is very nice, very pretty and so 
easy the cat can use it, but it just isn't very fast. It was invented 
so that people could execute complex operations using simple 
mouse movements instead of command lines. In one sense, 
Protext is a step backwards since it relies on the user putting in 
some extra work to get anything out. On the other hand r it 
allows Protext to carry out operations such as scrolling at speeds 
beyond those of any other word processor on the ST - Tempus is 
reputedly faster but it isn't a full fledged word processor. 

As an example, one area which benefits from Protexfs speed is 
the search arid replace facility (see table 1). 

Not only does it zap through a document and give a report of 
how many words were found, it's also able to cope with com- 
mand codes, so that, lor instance, as well as normal word or 
phrase replacement, any unwanted blank lines can be replaced 
by searching out the code for a hard return. Control codes, hard 



TABLE 1: 
Time taken to replace 37,000 a's with 37,000 e's 

WordFlus 3 2S3 seconds 
Le Kedacteur 119 seconds 
Protext 46 seconds 



returns and the like can be shown on screen if you wish at the 
expense of the WYSIWYG display, appearing as inverse video 
characters. 

To go through every single command available in Protext would 
be miii:h lots boring Lo read (and far Coo much liki. 1 hard work to 
write) So instead I'll just say that it has all the normal basic 
facilities you'd expect from a good word processor,, usually with a 
few extra bits tagged on, and I'll only touch on some of the more 
unusual features. 

One of these is the Box command. Using this it is possible to 
construct pseudo multi-column documents. It works similarly to 
the normal Block commands, but will actually deal with any 
area that a box can be drawn around, so if you format a 
document as one column, you can place a box around the 
second page and move it up next to the first, giving the layout of 
a two-column page. Any further editing will, unfortunately, 
destroy the format, so make sure everything's finished before you 
try moving it around r Another way of achieving the same thing 
is to use Protext r s extensive print commands to print only the 
odd numbered pages, rewind the paper, change the margin and 
ask it Lo print the even numt>ered pages, also useful when you 
want to print on both sides of the paper- 
Typewriter mode lets you send text directly to the printer which 
is ideal for writing the occasional envelope or short memo. 
Marked blocks can also be printed directly, so any small sections 
of text that you want to check the look of can be printed 
independently. Similarly, a block can be saved to disk,, either in 
Protext format or as ASCII. 

AN EXTENSIVE DICTIONARY 

The spell checker is incredibly versatile, being able to search for 
wild cards of uny length and in any order. This means that it can 
solve anagrams, help you out with the crossword puzzle or tell 
you all the words in its (upda table) dictionaries that have sixteen 
or more letters and what words of any ienglh have two x r s In. ft 
is also incredibly fast, as long as you have enough memory to 
put the dictionaries onto a RAM disk. If you only have a 520 
with floppy drive, then the disk is consulted for every word, and 
speed drops considerably. One strange thing about the 70,000 
word dictionary is that it recognizes words that I didn't even 
know existed: 1 can understand the inclusion of *pc J , but have 
you ever heard of the word r xx r for instance? There is also a 
German dictionary available and doubtless other languages will 
be catered for at a later date. Unfortunately, there is no the- 
saurus, something I find invaluable and would have expected to 
find in a program of this quality. Hopefully this will be available 
in future versions. 

Disk management is possible with one fairly major omission; No 
formatting. Again, this will hopefully be included later. The 
catalogue command does, however give the remaining disk 
space r and the top information line gives a continual update on 
the size of the document, so you should always know if you have 
enough space to save your work, Also, the latest version of 
Protext gives you access to desk accessories, so a small format 
accessory will solve that problem , 



52 P«»e 6 - Issue 37 




ppute^t- Upturn 1 ppn ? K.= i ■<■ 

t>4$C 1 ling 1 C-b 8 I 



RmhK-jtirsli'kj A- 



li t*H Hua- 14 »f thf St itsr-d BrpusiBC PrrtKt li iitrtptnt. Y&u cia 
ifll « won IS you 3Hd it us J MtiEtt tun *n i fil*di btckgrsind. 
Clcirer i Ad n«rc rfeliii*g, I tlfintit, njtttiltu uiiril, but this, 
ml just tbuut BWEry »t!WP tirfwlT SEtttnj inigirbiMe lm it cfcflrtflrt 
to suit yuir «fi neids *ai tEftperwent fcf yiw dufl't toesei* ts Site it* 

Ihe unt tfiini »au satin, HLth i jlijht burst irt pnic, Is tlut tt» 

fK. rfetlEy, Hp nemu, no ulMllHf,. jut 
like tin H«y our p-nt inndfithtrs did It. 
At first, rtijj J] i att Ulrttlfti, Sinet pq 
Mv« to Ictrn t tH umhsj titf ttttr then in 
t CMflifrd ittip lid thcrt you cjrt rurn ttKt 
imtlitr nimhj Utt Jjg iNMlni tht 
>_—__. i -«—« i „«•». j —± i *„ „ j < „_„ j «„** j 

tunii rutins rf Mv Drcjjcs tint lot ynti tcttss the iwitntt HEritUg. 
St ] en*? ]|tc ysi; nlgrtt hivt to rtid tht mmol ifttr ill. flrnnr ire 
Wbj ifflOBTStirtdS^ It Wit tltlf ■ In thelJ- nn words, 'toitaitll ire LtOJU 



Protexfs $met-WY$IWYG display 



II ibf mrld of tit ST mrd proctstw, Prawit ii differs*, tw t*t 
till oi nip h pliri it w - hmu tut h o Mode frocfcrtiri, 
Clwor HdrtofE r^uiAiK I tHuffkf. npttloUi ■* t T*, wt thJi> 
Mi jut «*t«t mri otfttr tftfut? sett in ImHamJo tu bt amm 
to uft y»w wt Mrts Mi uvrPHt if m toft howtn to like it. 

Tht itfiit ttUn. hh tttJtt. Hitti o sllitt torn of SMic is tht tti 
nrogrM ii UttlAft tfcert njJtlH far iif tt 7ME 1* J £ 

>— I ■ ■ ■■ i r | — — — | ii i | nn . n . ; -~Ht 

Y« , fu)ll|. if MFH^ M HltHHtl j«t 

likt iHe Hts our root or^fitMrj rfid it. 



UHJCE k(t*i: Tht Jost 

DptEHi fiJ.Cri.SAilE 



The separate command mode from which features like 
search and replace and speit checking tire performed 



reviewed 
by Piper 



OTHER FEATURES 

Protexl includes a calculator mode which ha& options to insert 
the result of any calculation directly into ihe text with up to nine 
decimals, Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division are 
supported, with brockets forcing the order of calculation away 
from the normal MDA5L 

MaU merging wSth Pretext is almost a language unto itself, 
containing conditional clauses like IF, ELSE and even UNTIL. 
Using these meuns that you can treat your data file almost like q 
data base, only sending out letters to those addresses which fulfil 
q certain condition, inserting variables and deciding how many 
decimal places should be included in calculations, The printing 
itself can be proportionally spaced by using the microspacing 
command, even if your printer doesn't support proportional 
printing, und the background printing facility allows you to 
carry on working whilst the printer is still thumping out your last 
document- 



Special characters can be accessed directly from the keyboard, in 
fact, Pretext allows you to almost completely redefine the 
keyboard,, alio winy whole phrases to be stored as. one key press. 
These phrases., along with any special formats and screen set- 
tings can be saved as EXEC files, and loaded up into any other 
document thereafter, very useful if you spend half your time 
writing in a language other than English and frequently want to 
use 'non-standard' characters, For long phrases, or strings of 
commands, there is a record' mode, which will remember each 
keystroke, then 'play back' that same sequence whenever you 
coil it up„ These macros can be up to 255 characters long and 
include commands, text and calculations. Jf 255 characters isn't 
enough for you, the end command of one macro can be used to 
call another macro, the linked pair being performed as one 
operation. Used sensibly, macros can greatly extend the useful- 
ness of the package, for example by recording search and replace 
operations on a series of words which you abbreviate while 
writing, but which you want in full in the end product. One 
macro will cope with all the replacing in one go. This technique 
can also be used to convert files in other formats over to Pretext 
format, replacing all the 'alien r control codes with 'native' Pro- 
text ones. Once you r re satisfied with your key definitions, they 
can be saved as a separate KEY file r which can be reloaded at 
any time, 

The graphics capabilities of Prole xt are its greatest limitation, 
consisting solely of a line drawing facility with which sections of 
text can be outlined, nice for giving tables a more professional 
look r but little else 

The price of Pretext puts it firmly in the 1st Word Plus range, so 
now you're probably expecting some sort of comparison and for 
me to say which 1 think 5s the best buy. Tough. Although they 
are both word processors, their approach is totally different, and 
it r s going to be down to individual preference as to which is best 
for you. Pretext is, 1 believe, the most powerful and versatile 
word processor currently available in its price range, and Amor 
are in the process of releasing other pieces of software designed 
specifically to interface with it, such as Protext Office, and they 
already include with Pretext a file conversion program so that if 
you have documents created on other word processors, including 
1st Word Plu$ r you don't have to start all over again fust because 
you bought something new, 

Protext is not, however, the easiest piece of software to get the 
hang of r simply because of the amount of information that has 
to be assimilated to make use of even half of its facilities, and it 
is not always the most friendly either (its possible to get the 
ever-popular 'PC bus error message by asking it to do things 
which the manual specifically forbids, }. Here 1st Word, and just 
about any other GEM based program, wins hands down. If you 
bought your ST in order to get away from command lines, 
Protext is not going to hold much appeal to you, but if you want 
full control and facilities that you don't even realize you want 
until you've got them, then a little effort with Protext will leave 
you happy for a very long time, 



PROTEXT 
Published by Amor 
Price: £79,95 

Points for: Gives almost complete confroJ, very fest, very 

versatile. 

Points against: Lots to memorise, no Thesaurus, bit cramped 

on a 520, no disk fbrmai command. 



Page 6 Issue 37 53 



JOAN OF 
ARC 





oan of Arc is basically a Defender of 
the Crown clone from France. For- 
tunately for those who like that sort 
of game, both the arcade sequences 

and the underlying strategy elements are 

significantly better than DotC, but it re- 
tains some Of Lhe worst features of that 

program, namely the tedious pauses 

while it shows you pretty pictures or 

loads the next sequence* and the lack of 

balance between the arcade and strategy 

elements. The game needs both mouse 

and joystick. All selection is done with 

the mouse, but you have to use the joys- 
tick for most of the arcade games. 
It is May, 1429. You are Charles, the 

Dauphin of France, soon, hopefully, to 

be Charles the Vllth, King of France, The 

main screen shows a map of Fran cv, 

indicating which provinces belong to the 

French and the English, and aha those 

belonging to Burgundy and Brittany, 

both of which are rebelling. Your objec- 
tive is to turn the whole map blue. 
Selecting one of the two prime icons 

[jives you a map showing the weather 

unci another showing how friendly the 

French provinces are to you. The other prime icon brings up a 

menu of .seven options, Once you have been crowned you can 

use all of these. For the moment you have just one small army 

led by Joan so you select 'Start a Campaign' and head for 

Orleans. The instructions are atrocious, you actually need to 

select 'Displacement', point at loan's flay, point at loan's name, 

and point at your destination, None of that is in the instructions! 

This is further complicated by the fact that often it will display 

a large box with a message m it. If you press the mouse button 

to get rid of the box, you will discover that you have also 

unintentionally selected a province as well - use the joystick 

button to get rid of boxes! 
Once you have moved to an enemy province you can start 

attacking towns, for each town you have to play two joystick- 
driven arcade games, first hack your way past enemy soldiers to 

cross a drawbridge and enter the town (you can hack in three 

directions with your sword), then scale the ladders to reach the 

battlements - you can climb, jump sideways, or raise your shield 

to avoid falling rocks* but the boiling oil is deadlyl 
The first problem with the arcade games is working out how 

to use the controls, the first two aren't too bad, but the other two 

are terrible. One involves you defending the tops of the [adders, 

with weird combinations of button and directions - at last I 

found a use for my StarTrak button joystick! The other is one- 
on-one mounted combat where the instructions are completely 

wrong: attack is push, slush is pull charge is pull and keep 

pulling., and left and right both turn you and make you ride - 

you don't need to keep pointing left or right - five errors in one 

paragraph! 
The second problem is the pauses - once you have crossed the 

drawbridge you get to watch little men run across for 20 seconds 

then wait for a 30 second load, it may only take you 5 seconds 

to climb the battlements, then another 20 seconds of little men Reviewed by John Sweeney 

54 t'utj* 6 - Uvur 37 



climbing up walls, followed by another 30 second load - you 
can't suppress any of it - you have to watch the little men - and 
there are a lot of towns to capture! 

The third problem is the difficulty leveJ - none of the arcade 
sequences are ali that difficult once you have mastered them h but 
when you do lo.se one you can never be quite certain whether 
it Is because you have insufficient skill, too small an army., or 
just some unlucky ''dice throws' by the computer. 
You will also meet enemy armies in the open - here you get 
another tittle game to play r mouse-driven this time. The battle- 
field is displayed with a row of icons beneath it to allow you to 
command your archers to fire or move Left or right your troops 
to move left or riyhL, your cuvalry to 
charge, or your bombardiers to raise, 
lower or fire their cannons. The terrain 
and weather varies, the armies are 
shown as scores of tiny slick men mar- 
ching or riding over the plain r and the 
bombs and arrows ily overhead most 
realistically - good fun to play, but again 
difficult to tell how much of your success 
is. due to skill and how much to superior 
numbers or luck. 

Once you have freed Orleans and 
Rheims you gel crowned and can start to 
use all the other options: Diplomacy 
(Armistice, Peace Treaty, Alliance, 
Buying towns, Ransoming Prisoners - an 
excellent source of income), Espionaye 
(spying out Garrisons or Armies), Help- 
ing Hand (Assassination or Kidnapping - 
you have a number of nasty pieces of 
work in your employ !>, Taxation (both 
yearly tithes and special taxes - watch 
out lhaugh they have them the wrong 
way round on the menu!) r Royal justice 
(Arrest, Pardon, or Execution), and Rais- 
ing of the Royal Armies. 

The concept is great, the implementa- 
tion not so good in places, Some of the 
selections require numerous choices r for example if you are 
trying to ransom one of your prisoners back to the enemy, you 
need lo select an enemy to negotiate with, a prisoner, a ransom 
amount, a locution for the negotiations, and two ambassadors, 
Although this gives the game a lot of depth, it takes a long time 
to select (about one and a half minutes, mainly because of the 
superb graphics it insists on displaying EVERY time), there is no 
way to cancel anything if you make a mistake (this applies to 
the whole game!), and, should you be rejected, there is no 
indication of why you failed - did you ask for too much, or 
maybe you sent the wrong ambassador, or was it just the town 
you chose for the negotiations? The lack of feedback makes you 
wonder what the point of a tot of it is. Fortunately there is a nice 
speedy save/restore facility so you can recover from yoar 
mislukes[ 

Despite all theses niggles., the game does have quite a lot to it. 
The graphics are superb throughout and there is plenty of variety 
- you can even get your mother-in-law beheaded for witchcraft 
if you like - complete with gory full-screen animated graphics! 
If you like the combination of strategy and arcade game and 
are of a tempera ment such that you don't get too upset by 
having to watch coins fall into a box for 45 seconds every lime 
you collect taxes (and I thought watching paint dry was boringi) 
then joan of Arc is certainly worth looking at. I much preferred 
it to Defender of the Crown r and if they ever actually bother to 
play test one of these games with real people, then one day we 
may get a superb game of this genre - how can a game of this 
depth not have a PAUSE button? 

Created by Chip/Softgold/GO!/US. GOLD 
Priced at £19.99 






'mm 



SETTING THE ST APART 







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hy invest thousands of pounds on a 
typesetting system, or pay high type- 
setting charges, when you can achieve 
the same high standards on your ST? Sales 
brochures, business forms, newsletters, 
all can be produced on the Atari, using any 
DTP program capable of producing PostScript 
files. For example:Pagestream f Fleet Street 
Publisher and Publishing Partner We are the 
only bureau able to offer a large selection of 
typefaces for the ST together with quick turn- 
around and professional advice. 
Please phone for further details. 




■THE 



S - E - T_- T - 1 - N * G 



STUD 







SUITE 6 - ST. THOMAS STREET STABLES . ST, THOWAS STREET . NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE NE1 4LE TEL: 091 232 151 7/2324*95 ext 306 

JJl.JIJv.llJ.lll 



Contacts: Phil Coo/es {Atari) 



rr (Sates A Macintosh) 



A MIDIot's Guide to Music Making on the Atari 



1. 



Just what is 
MIDI? 



Anyone interested in popular music can't have failed to 
notice the impact of computer technology over the last 
few years. Electronic musical instruments- use similar 
hardware technology to computers, and it was inevitable that 
computers would eventually be incorporated as a music making 
aid. Two major events helped make this possible. One was the 
advent of MIDI, the Musical Instrument Digital Interface. The 
other was the arrival of the Atari ST r which came ready equipped 
to exploit it. 

Before 1983 each electronic instrument manufacturer tended to 
use his own pet method of internally controlling and externally 
interconnecting his keyboards and sowd sources. This was fine if 
all your gear come from one manufacturer, but posed problems 
if it didn't. And it usually didn'tl 

To complicate the issue, many of the early electronic: instru- 
ments were J monophonic' r Ue. could only sound one note at a 
time (like a clarinet, for instance). 'Polyphonic 1 sound with two 
or more notes sounding simultaneously (like a piano, for exam- 
ple) required a separate sound source for each note, and separate 
keyboards to play them. The result was often a heap of equip- 
ment interconnected by a spaghetti-like mass of cabling., which 
the poor musician needed six hands to play and a degree in 
electrical engineering to understand. 

KEYBOARDS AND SYNTHESISERS 

Today, the tenn keyboard generically describes anything having 

a piano-style key Layout. As well as piano keys electronic 
keyboards also normally have a plethora of control buttons, 
wheels, and switches to activate various functions. Usually., but 
not always, there's a sound source built into the same case. 
Often there's a built-in amplifier, speaker, and various automatic 
chord and rhythm features too, making it a completely self 
contained instrument well suited to home use - hence the term 

home keyboard'. Good keyboards also have the all important 
MIDI ports. 

A sound source is a means of electronically creating sound and 
is usually known as a synthesiser, ft may be built into a 
keyboard or exist as a separate unit r when It's known as an 




One of several Jaw cos* MIDI keyboards available 



A new series in which 
John S Davison shows that you 
don't need to be a professional 
musician to enjoy making 
music with your Atari 

"expander' or ''rack mount 1 module., connecting to a keyboard via 
its MIDI ports. A true synth J allows you to custom build sounds 
to your own specifications. These are usually known as patches' 

and have to be programmed into the synth, often an arduous 
task involving manipulation of dozens of parameters. Other 
forms of sound source include various types of J pre-set J sound 
ye aerators designed to provide a fixed ranae of specific sounds, 
or 'timbres', usually push-button selectable. Modern synths 
usually include many such pre-sets in addition to synthesis 
features. 

THE BIRTH OF MIDI 

In 1983 the major manufacturers collaborated in the design of a 
standard interface and communications protocol for electronic 
musical instruments. The aim was to simplify interconnection 
and provide standard control messages which suitably equipped 
instruments could send to each other and act upon. In .simple 
terms it allowed you to play anybody's sound source from 
anybody else's keyboard. Each manufacturer could still use uni- 
que INTERNAL design for his instruments, but EXTERNAL com- 
munication would conform to the new standard, 
To keep the link simple and inexpensive they based it on a 
shielded twisted-pair cable terminating in ISO-degree five pin 
DIN plugs (as found on many hi-fi systems). When used with a 
serial digital interface this approach allowed many different 
control messages to be transmitted via the same cable connec- 
tion. Previously > each cable hud usually been dedicated to a 
specific control function, 

Polyphonic operation was a prime requirement so the link had 
to be fast enough to play musical chords, achieved by rapidly 
transmitting the individual notes of the chore] in sequence. For 
the technically minded the agreed standard specified a 5mA 
current loop to communicate asynchronously at 31.25 kilobits/ 
sec using one start, one stop, and eight data bits. 
Another requirement was for 'multi-timbraL' operation, that is, 
polyphonic sound with each note potentially having a different 
timbre, to sound like a group of different instruments playing 
together . This was implemented via sixteen MIDI 'channels', 
each capable of handling a separate timbre. A sound source can 
be set to respond to messages for a yiven channel and to ignore 
others. This, allows the musician to selectively play a particular 
sound source in an interconnected group, or to play several 
sound sources simultaneously from one keyboard. 

MIDI MESSAGES 

MIDI keyboards don't simply activate switches to turn sounds on 
and off. They generate short (usually three bytes or less) digital 
control messages which are then transmitted to and acted upon 



56 Page 6 - Issue 37 



by John S Davison 



by other components of the MIDI system. These components 
could include the keyboard's own built-in sound source, or exter- 
nal sound sources linked to the keyboard via MIDI ports,, which 
we'll hear about shortly. 

The most fundamental messages are Note On and "Note Off. 
Press a key and a Note On message is sent. It contains the note 
number, velocity value, and channel number. Note number tells 
the sound source the pitch of the note to be played, while 
velocity value specifies how loud it should sound. Pitch range is 
128 semitones (10+- octaves), each semitone corresponding to a 
note number. The note is played by any attached sound source 
set to respond to messages with that channel number. It sounds 
until you release the key, when a Note Off message is sent to 
silence it. 

The next most important MJDI message is Program Change. 
This causes the sound source to switch between any of 126 
'programs' an a given channel, where a program is usually a 
pre-set timbre or your own custom designed patch. It's generated 
by pressing a selector button on the keyboard. 

Other common messages include those created by various 
keyboard controllers, the most common of which is the 'pitch 
bend J wheel used for varying the pitch of a note around its 
nominal value. Then there's the 'modulation' wheel, used for 
varying some other aspect of the sound such as amount of 
vibrato. Some keyboards also have 'aftertouch' capability and 
send messages relating to further pressure applied to keys after 
their initial depression. This can be used to trigger additional 
effects. 

There are also System messages, which affect the system opera- 
tion as a whole rather than specific notes, channels, or control- 
lers. Prominent amongst these is the System Exclusive message, 
which provides a way for manufacturers to implement their own 
extensions to the basic MIDI standard, It's also a means of 
saving and Loading patch data for your custom built sounds, 
either to/from other compatible MIDI equipped musical instru- 
ments or storage/editing devices such as computers. 

MIDI PORTS 

Messages are passed between interconnected components of a 
MIDI system via the MIDI ports, of which there are three types: 
MIDI IN, MIDI OUT, and MIDI THRU. You may find one, 

two, or all three of them on MIDI equipment, depending on Its 
function. 

MIDI IN accepts MIDI messages from elsewhere, so you II 
find it on anything capable of reacting to MIDI messages, 
such as synthesisers, drum machines, and computers, It con- 
nects to the MIDI OUT (or sometimes THRU) port of other 
equipment. 

MIDI OUT makes MIDI messages available to the outside 
world, so is found on equipment capable of generating them, 
such as keyboards and computers. MIDI OUT connects to the 
MIDI IN port of other equipment. 
MIDI THRU provides a 'through connection' for 'daisy 
chaining' together several pieces of MIDI equipment. It works 
in conjunction with the MIDI IN port, providing a duplicate 
of the messages input there. By connecting the MIDI THRU of 
one sound source to the MIDI IN of another, MIDI messages 
from a single keyboard or computer can he presented to 
several sound sources at once. If each Is set to respond to 
different channels you can selectively play sounds from any 
of them by changing the channel numbers the keyboard 
transmits on. 

The ST appears to have onEy IN and OUT ports, but in fact it 



has all three. The OUT socket is actually a non-standard com- 
bined OUT and THRU, but don't ask me why! If you really need 
THRU, it's available on pins 1 and 3 (the outermost connections) 
of the OUT socket. 



Desk File UA Iff TITI ETO7 1 



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One of dozens of MIDI related public domain programs 

ENTER THE ST 

So far we've really only talked about communication between 
keyboards and sound sources, The beauty of M1DF is that com- 
munication can extend beyond these to include other devices 
capable of handling MfDI messages, the most important being 
the computer. Those ST MIDI ports are similar to any other I/O 
port in that a program running in the ST can write/read data via 
them in the form of MIDI messages. 

If you connect a keyboard's MIDI OUT to the ST's MIDI IN, then 
the MIDI message sequence generated by playing the keyboard 
may be read and stored by a suitable program in the ST. If the 
ST J s MlDt OUT is connected to a sound source's MIDI IN and the 
same message sequence sent to It, then the sound source will 
behave EXACTLY as though the sequence had come directly from 
the keyboard. 

The ST acts like a tape recorder, but instead of reproducing a 
copy of the sound, it RECREATES the sound on the instrument 
which originally produced it. The stored MIDI messages can also 
be written to disk if required, for replay at any future time, This 
is the basis of the software sequencer', a fundamental part of 
any computer based MIDI system. 

GETTING STARTED 

To get started with MIDI you'll need a minimum of the follow- 
ing: an ST? a suitable sequencer program; a home keyboard 
equipped with MIDI IN and OUT ports and two MIDI leads. The 
home keyboard provides both the piano keyboard and sound 
source, and allows you to hear what you're ploying through its 
built-in amplification system. 

Actually, the ST isn't mandatory r There's a MIDI interface and 
sequencer software available for the 8-bit machines from Audio 
Visual Research (previously Two-Bit Systems), I hope to have 
more details of this in the next issue, when Til be covering the 
musical hardware aspects of MIDI systems. Also included will be 
details of the best low cost keyboards I've come across for the 
MIDI beginner - the fantastic Yamaha PS54S0 and PSS680 home 
keyboards. 

Until next time I hope that your understanding of the combina- 
tion of keyboard and computer has been enhanced a little and 
when you read about specific keyboards next Issue, maybe you 
will be tempted to get your computer to start playing music in 
your own home, # 



Page 6 - Issue 37 57 



LADBROKE COMPUTING 

INTERNATIONAL _ 

This company has; given years of FuLI support Id Atari usws from their retail premises at 33 Orantirk Kuad Freston. Now fro m (heir Mail Order 
premises they ean offer this " second to none " service to users countrywide. All Soft Wfr^Hard ware is cx-stock and fully tested prior to purchase 
to ensure that customers receive total satisfaction, returned gemfe are now a thing of the past. All hardware is supported by our on site engineer* 
«0 that quick turn around on all repairs is guaranteed. There are no hidden extras, ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT and delivery (next day 
delivery +£3) N arc correct at time of going to press and arc subject fo change without prior notice. 




C * ' vi w -I f • S PFUtlO 3 ] - r i- * s h , J l 




Midistudio £99.99 

VEicl'tetudJo is a 20 (rack Mid|| Muaie Studio. This Widl mftivnr* pw3u«c is u k ^alfixtkallji piked 

intioductioii to Midi music processing unci include* the fol lowing features. 

20 track* euch assisnafclfc one of Lfr midi ctannek, each Hack cun be imisposed uqs er down 2 octHW* 
Iba main- screen featmes full uuk deck contmfe \irih individual volume &bdcts for each Irack, note 
cciiiinji facilities irtciutttn^ cdpiinjj of pitch, octave, duration nnd vekdt>. plus full midi controller 
ecitketpnch bend, mod whecL efl&X Ful) cenlrel over phrase it offered through Quantizing, 
tnuispoiiiiE, Mid phi^-e ;uTiingLmi;iil sof tunic pagosu The un-ingtniejir fscililits allow movins and 
copying phcacMS On nm of (he 20 tnnckn. Tht.- piickugc- k cs^y to UK unci is a slraig concelhor *ilh 
Pm 24. 



Out performs Pro-24 v2. / /// almost every way 
Atari ST User Jan 89 



Tf 



rti 












- 




JfcM/Y^TV/^ /r; /fl%? &F/EOR OM,r£S9.P9 

The Image Scanner in ii pcriiihvral for Ilk ST which cun provide 
hfgjh C|Uttli[> fciiiphics. dlsitjslnj for rt tenlh of I he cose of otlur 
digilisaiv This simple unit plu^H into ihc citftridge pal of (he ST 
and accents canned ir^OfTTiattafl vk op ticuk cables; which fix CLisih 
to iliLf head of fin> oi inter. Scanned images can be saved in raw 
iLiLiiu Dcsas and Neod-Lronic forniats. The Sofiwuje suppon* 
gcaminj T^olutions of 75J 50,21 WOO, 36C and 1000 dob pa inch 
hoiiH-.tm.lukl>. An PNampfc disk is 4ivnj]nbLc which contains- a slide 
dio* of imiujcM Beamed ^iih this product Tht eosl of this disk 
is £3-99, E2.CX) of which h redeemable on purck-Ke el a scunner. 

/4/>* GE SCA NNER ONL Y £89. 99 




Add With Oscsr £12.99 EDUCA TIONAL SOFTWARE Spef/ With Oscar £1299 



A(W uHh Oscia- ks a fut]y mouse oonuo]]ed 
educalinasd game VL'iih full colow scieenv 
and souikL for inching addition., subtracttan, 
mulllpliCLUion. Liinl dhision ro c hi EcU ^n. This 
program hai electable Jiff kuliy ]c\c|s ,ind 
a Hl"Sccfc table. 



Bin «Kfii ilsoofi 


■ 


f i " ■ ffi*|)| Viii E 


If 3 ^ i 


fei!" 


SODSBlBSIIi 



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jpawM 


ketti- I ";>, g;;sij 


. 









S])o]] wiih Oscftj- ta a game which ic.ichcs 
spelling, Iceytaflid skills: anil moloj-coojili- 
nncioii. Pictuies- of objeecs move smooth l> 
accioss (he screen und 1he pupi] shoulLl sjscil 
Ihe name of dvi cbjycl while Oscar check* 
for mj*[ifehcs- Spdt ulso inccjrpaa^s seleci - 
»bl L - difLulh |^f]s und ;\ Hi-sc^v 1^le. 
Extra JaiD diskK £5,99 



TRILOGY £TZ99 



Quick List Plus is u uoJlev (ha! 
CDtnpilcj; ;i cLmtccJoiv of >Oii- disks, Sent on 
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Designing with 

FLAIR 



Another paint program? Will it topple Degas? 
John S Davison reaches for his brushes 



Another ST paint prog- 
ram? Yes, but this one's 
aimed primarily at the 
user needing high quality pic- 
tures for use in desktop pub- 
lishing applications, although 
it could be used as a general 
paint program if required. It 
runs in low resolution colour or 
monochrome, and while it 
works in S12K you may need 
one megabyte or more to fully 
exploit its capabilities, 

The package contains two 
single sided disks, one for prog- 
ram code and GDOS , the other 
for GDOS fonts, printer drivers, 
and three sample pictures. The 
85 page spiral bound manual is a little 
weak on some topics, like GDOS for exam- 
ple, which hardly gets a mention. 

PAINT ON A CANVAS 

There are two major features which dif- 
ferentiate Flair from other paint packages. 
The first is its ability to create canvases 

larger than screen size, This enables you to 
produce a picture sized to match the re- 
solution of your printer. For instance, if 
your ST had enough memory (2MB) you 
could create a massive canvas to take an 
A4 size picture at 300 dpi (that's about 
2500 X 3500 pixels') for printing on a laser 
printer - with every pixel editable by scroll- 
ing the canvas through the screen window. 

The second feature is that Flair can oper- 
ate as a GEM desktop accessory alongside 
a suitable GEM based desktop publishing 
program (again, memory permitting}. The 
user is then able to quickly flip from DTP 
page composition into Flair to create/edit 
a picture and back again, Obviously, the 
two programs have to use compatible pic- 
ture file formats, but Flair should work 
with most DTP programs as it handles 
DEGAS (uncompressed), Neochrame, and 
Art Director file formats in addition to its 
own. 

Another unusual feature is its real-time 
display of graphical transformations. You 
control the amount of rotation, resizing, 
shearing, and mirroring applied to an 
area of the picture by moving the mouse 
and watching the transformation happen 
on the screen. When you see the effect you 
want, you capture it with a click of the 
mouse. It responds reasonably quickly un- 




less you're working with large chunks of 
the picture, when response becomes slower 
and control more difficult, 

INTERNAL ACCESSORIES 

Flair is also supplied with its own 'acces- 
sories' including a notepad, clock, control 
panel, and calendar, plus an optional 
RAMdLsk and printer spooler if you have 
the memory to spare. These are internal 
features of the program and can't be used 
elsewhere like normal accessories. 

On the functional front it's got most of 
the drawing, painting, and editing facili- 
ties found in other good paint programs, 
plus a few more besides. These include the 
ahllily to draw arcs and smooth Rezier 
curves; lines of selectable thickness with 
square, rounded, or arrowed ends; and a 
useful selection of colour fill operations. 
These perform such things as fill to a 
boundary colour, fill all areas except those 
in selected colours, and to swap and selec- 
tively replace colours. 

There qtz nice features for defining your 
own brushes and fill pa tterns P including a 
"snapshot' function which turns any part 
of the screen into a pattern. Selective 
painting is possible, where the new colour 
will only 'take' over areas of selected col- 
ours, and the variable rate airbrush sprays 
in patterns as well as solid colour. It has 
a good grid-lock system, and there's an 
excellent variable power magnify feature 
for really detailed work .,., but stop! 
There's just not space here to cover every- 
thing. 

Flair's designers did miss a few features. 
For instance, you can load several pictures 



but they 
work. 



onto one canvas, but can only 
use one 16 colour palette be- 
tween them - no flipping be- 
tween alternate pictures and 
palettes here. Also, there's no 
quick way of erasing all or part 
of a picture. You have to paint 
or fill with an appropriate col- 
our to blot out the offending 
area. There is an Undo feature, 
though, I found Flair's file 
handling tiresome too. You 
can't get a complete disk direc- 
tory listing, and it seems to take 
a lot of clicking and mousing 
around to get at the files you 
want. No animation or colour 
rotation facilities are provided, 
aren't really needed for DTP 



TABLET DRIVEN 

The program's functions are accessed 
through a system of 'tablets"' - graphical 
menus which can be positioned anywhere 
on the screen. Despite AMS r s c:loirn r this 
system is by no means intuitive and [ 
found myself referring to the manual 
rather more than I wished. 

Flair is not without its problems, either. 
The canvas size redefinition process just 
wouldn't work on my elderly 512K 
520STM, causing program crashes when 
using anything but a screen sized canvas. 
It worked perfectly On a friend's new 
1040STFM, but memory shortage wasn't 
the problem. Operating system incompati- 
bility., perhaps? Users of older machines 
beware! 

Flair Paint is undoubtedly an innovative 
product and although possessing a tew 
rough edges it could be of great interest to 
someone with specialised DTP/printing re- 
quirements. The typical home user, 
though, would probably he better served 
by one of the more general purpose paint 
programs such as Degas Elite, Art Director, 
or Spectrum 512. Think carefully about 
your requirements before buying. * 



Title: Flair Paint 
Publisher: Advanced 

Memory Systems 
Price: £34,95 



L'ucji- 6 - IsNiit- 17 59 



ST GAMES ... ST GAMES ... ST GAMES 



FISH! 

Magnetic Scrolls/ 

Rainbird 

ST £24.95 



Reviewed by 
John Sweeney 



1 haven't had so much fun far agesl FISH! 
Ls probably the best advent Line of 19ES. 
Basically it Ls a text adventure - you type 
in what you want to do and it responds 
with some text telling you what happened 
(and maybe a new picture - excellent 
graphics if you like that sort of thing). 
There are, as usual, lots of nice facilities to 
make playing easier: command editing r 
function key definition, fast save/restore to 
disk, variable textsize, mono screen sup- 
port, etc. The packaging is good - back- 
g round in formation, instructions-, poster, 
hints, and a free One Week Travelcard for 
the Hydropolis Underground Omnibus 
Company[ The parser and vocabulary are 
excellent, and it is full of enjoyable text - 
as long as you can stand all the fish jokes! 
But the game itself is what matters. It is 
truly superb - absolutely packed full of 




humour and puzzles. 

The game is called FISHt because you ARE 
a fish. An intelligent fish, mind you, from 
another dimension. You are in fact a 
trainee inter-dimensional espionage oper- 
ative with the ability to warp your mind 
into the body of living things in other 
dimensions. As the game starts you aie 
enjoying a well-deserved vacation in a 
fish -bow] when you are summoned to find 
the three missing components of a focus 
wheel, stolen from another dimension by 
your arch-enemies, the Seven Deadly Fins 
(I did warn you about the fish jokes!). 

Finding each of these components is a 
separate little adventure which gives you a 
relatively easy introduction to the game - 
you can tackle them in any order and they 
are not inter-related in any way. Once you 
have succeeded with all of them yon get 



into the main game - now you warp into 
the body of a mer-man and must locate 
both your enemies and various devices 
you need in order to save this world from 
destruction. 

The Magnetic Scrollers have packed FISH! 
with superb puzzles., some fairly straight- 
forward, other? quite complex, but all 
highly logical and supported by plentiful 
clues. Try everything even if it seems to be 
wrong at the time - you never know where 
it will lead - these guys have devious 
minds! And they have been careful to 
think of most of the oddball ideas you 
might have, so that when you try them 
you get interesting results (usually humor- 
ous or misleading]) - even if it doesn't get 
you any nearer the solution! 

There is one minor bug - the very last 
command in the game is fairly obvious, 
but unfortunately not programmed adequ- 
ately - if you are stuck try I LA UHJXOD- 
WRU ZiWK VF13HZ (take 3 from each 
letter}. 

Thai aside, this is one of THE great games 
- highly recommended - watch out for the 
next one as welt - ALICE IN WONDER- 
LAND, hopefully in May. (I WAS going to 
tell you lots more about some of the puz- 
zles and jokes and especially the 'maze' In 
The Dimensions - now that is WEIRD., but 
the editor says I am only allowed 500 
words! Best game of the year and they 
limit you to 500 measly wordsE) 



GAR 


FIE 


LD 


..BIG, 


FAT, 


HAI 


RY DEAL 


The Edge 




£19.95 





Reviewed by 
John S Davison 



Disaster. It could only happen to u cat on 
a Monday, especially if his name is Gar- 
field. Garfield's girlfriend Arlene has been 
captured by some unspeakably insensitive 
character and taken to the City Pound, 
This has had a miraculous effect on our 
fat feline friend - it's galvanized him into 
ACTIO M Yes, the world's laziest cat is con- 
templating a rescue mission, and it's up to 
you to help him by guiding him through 
his comic strip world in search of his. 
beloved. 

The game takes the form of an arcade 
adventure, the layout being the Arbuckle 
household and garden, and the town in 
which it's situated. Scattered around this 
world in usual arcade adventure fashion 
are a number of objects, most of which 




will help Garfield in some way with his 
quest. The trick is to find the right use for 
each object. There aren't that many ob- 
jects, so seasoned adventurers will find the 
game very easy. 

You'll find several of your favourite char- 
acters from Garfield's world in this game. 
As well as Garfield himself you'll get to 
meet Odie, the world's most stupid dog, 
NermaL the world's cutest kitten, and of 
course there's Arlene - when you eventual- 
ly find her. |on Art>uckie r Garfield's. owner, 
appear* very briefly in a couple of the 
games's locations. 

As usual, Garfield gets hungry very quick- 
ly so you have to ensure he stays well fed. 
There are plenty of opportunities to eat, as 
his world is scattered with food of various 
kinds. Make sure you pander to his hunger 
pangs, as failure to do so eventually re- 



sults in a Nap Attack when he'll suddenly 
fall Hut on his face and yo to sleep, hold- 
ing up the action somewhat! 

The game's strength is in its excellent 
graphics, looking as if they've come 
straight from the easel of Jim Davis., Gar- 
field's creator. The backdrops are cleanly 
and colourfully drawn, the characters are 
unmistakable, looking exactly as you'd ex- 
pect, and the animation of them is a de- 
liyht to see. Many of Garfi eld's expressions 
and mannerisms are caught perfectly, 
such us the wuy he grins, or gobbles his 
food, or kicks Odie or Nermul around (an 
essential part of the gome). Odie, too, lives 
up to expectations, slobbering and bounc- 
ing around doing his best to help Garfield 
(but often hindering him}. And I found the 
way Nermal skitters back and forth across 
the screen really amusing. 

The program's sound side isn't quite so 
good, consisting of a choice between con- 
tinuous music or sound effects plus odd 
musical fanfares, The music is competent- 
ly done but becomes monotonous quite 
quickly, white there aren't really enough 
sound effects if you turn the music off. 

Overall, I found the game amusing and 
entertaining. It's easy to complete so can't 
really be classed as good value for the 
serious gameplayer. Younger players and 
Garfield fans will love it, though. 



6Q 



Page 6 - issue 37 



ST GAMES ... ST GAMES ... ST GAMES.. 



BOMBUZAL 

I mage works 
£19.95 



Reviewed by 
Ron Stewart 



When a program comes to me for review I 
usually give il a quick look over and then 
go back to rny current favourite. This sequ- 
ence of actions did not occur when Bom- 
buzal turned up on my doorstep. From the 
first load I was hooked Into solving the 
one hundred and twenty puzzles that the 
gome presents. Each puzzle consists of a 
series of tiles laid out in differing patterns. 
On the tiles are Bombs, You are tasked 
with blowing up the Bombs, without get- 
ting yourself blown up. Easy? In concept, 
yes! In practice, No! 

There are three sizes of bomb, plus a 
bomb that continuously changes its size as 
you play, Each size of Bomb has a dis- 
tent blast area and if there are any other 
Bombs within the blast area these will be 
triggered in a chain reaction. You can 
quite easily stand next to the smallest 
Bomb when it goes off. Stand next to any 
of the others and you get yourself blown 




up, Part of the puzzle is that the larger 
Bombs must be set off by the smaller 
Bomber Another variation on the bomb 
theme is the use of bombs with satelhte 

dishes. These will be triggered when you 
set off a bomb with a similar dish. 
Also included in this most fiendish of 
puzzles are the different kind? of tiles. Nor- 
mal tiles will be destroyed by the Bombs 
and setting off a string of Bombs tan leave 
you stranded. Dissolver tiles allow you to 
walk over them once, then they disappear. 
Slotted tiles allow you to move Bombs 
around the slots. Riveted tiles will remain 
after an explosion and ice tiles are a slip- 
pery surface on which you cannot stop. 
These are the basic features, but the desig- 
ners did not stop there. Other features 
have been added to the tiles. These include 
teleport devices and switches which will 
change the game by adding or destroying 



tiles and features, On some levels you will 
come across two droids, Bubble and 
Squcek, that you can use to your advan- 
tage to remotely detonate Bombs. Beware 
of Sinister and Dexter though. They are 
out to get you so you have to avoid them, 
blow them up or isolate them on a tile. 
You can see then that with all these 
possible combinations, the puzzles can get 
very devious and complex. Because many 
of the puzzles take up an area greater 
than the screen, you can press the space 
bar and calJ up a map of the current level 
to help plan your strategy. The higher the 
level the more complex they become. You 
do not, however, have to go through all 
the levels every time you start the game. 
Every eight levels you are given a pass- 
word that allows you to start from where 
jrou left off. if you loose all your lives you 
can also continue the game again from 
the current puzzle. Finally, just so that you 
don't yet too bored with the game you can 
play in 2D or 3D viewpoints. The 3D vlew^ 
point make the game play a little more 
difficult, but this is more than compen- 
sated for by the superb graphics. In fact, 
throughout this game the graphics are ex- 
cellent. 

If you enjoy a good puzzle and like a little 
fun at the same time then Bombuzal is 
very highly recommended. 



SPEEDBALL 

Imageworks 
£24.95 



Reviewed by 
Damon Howarth 



Images of fames Caan went flashing 
through my mind as I unpackaged this 
gume. The illustration on the box was 
almost a ringer for any Rollerbail player 
ever seen and the concept is derived from 
the same source. 

The idea of the game is to choose one of 
the three pre-designed teams and compete 
in either a league or cup tournament 
against either another player or the com- 
puter. Plenty of documentation is included 
to help the rookie choose his team and in 
this phase a little role playing can help the 
choice. There are no rules as to tackling 
and there is even the chance to bribe offi- 
cials and opposing trainers in order to 
obtain an unfair advantage. When play- 
ing the computer this becomes very neces- 
sary since it plays a fast and mean game. 
The object of the game is to play a form 




'this one is 
a gem' 

of five a side handball, to rules that make 
American Football look soft, and on the 
way round the playing area obtain 
various bonus squares. These squares 
range from a monetary unit used to bribe 
and corrupt between glomes or immediate 
bonuses that vary between freezing the 
opposition to reversing their joystick con- 
trol temfHirarily or even allowing you to 
automatically possess the ball. 
There is an option to play two handed 
and that presents a very absorbing and 
well balanced two player game. I believe 
that there are those who have set up their 
own leagues with this game, that could 



prove to tie somewhat challenging and 
absorbing. The game even has a save op- 
tion, although it is imperative you do not 
believe it r s routine that reads "Please insert 
Data/Speedball disk, all non Speedball 
data will be destroyed", This is not true as I 
found to my horror after much playing 
when I saved a game to the Speedball disc 
only to discover that the process totally 
reformatted the disc leaving only a saved 
game position and no game to play it in. 
Imageworks will restore the disk for a 
charge of £3 but why on earth should you 
have to pay for a replacement when you 
only followed the instructions given? 
The game is a Bitmap Brothers creation,, 
that is the same people who created 
Xenon, and some echoes of that hit can be 
seen in the screens and naming of team 
captains. The whole package is colourful 
and responsive to the joystick even in two 
player mode with a great deal on screen, 
indeed in the beginning stages the compu- 
ter may seem a trifle too fast for the 
neophyte. Do not let this deter you 
though, as a little practice enables some 
very close games to be held with the 
machine. In the realm of two player 
games really good playable ones are hard 
to find but this one is a gem. 
This has pace, tactics., skill and all the 
joystick waggling anyone could desire and 
is well worth buying. 



Page f. Issue 37 bi 



ST GAMES ... ST GAMES ... ST GAMES.., £ 



BAAL 

Psy gnosis 
£24.95 



Reviewed by 
Damon Howarth 



This new game from Psy gnosis appears to 
have learnt quite a bit from previous 
games such as Barbarian. Jt is a platform 
and ladders style combat game, controlled 
by the joystick and suitable for one player. 
The hero is an archaeologist who has disc- 
overed that an evil demon has designs on 
world ending and therefore needs to go 
and stop him before we are all enslaved to 
Boars will. The story comes in a booklet 
which also gives strong warnings about 
viruses and how to stop them spreading 
and also includes on its health warning 
'this game is tough", 

The action takes place in three levels as 
you attempt to trace a] I the lost items of 
the artifact necessary to destroy the 
menace once and for a]]. The rather com- 
plicated screen informs the player of the 
grid reference and number of parts found 
so far. It is also necessary to find ammuni- 
tion for the laser you carry in order to 




make it more powerful and thus deal with 
tougher creatures more effectively. Furth- 
ermore it is important to find rocket fue] 
and the rocket back packs to enable furth- 
er exploration. The location of the land 
mines and the formidable monsters make 
progress dangerous and difficult, and the 
accompanying sound effects add a great 
deal of depth to the engrossing action. 

The artwork of the backdrops and the 
sprites need special mention as they are 
extremely atmospheric and contain super- 
bly drawn and coloured features. The 
monster sprites look horrific and their ani- 
mation is surprisingly smooth. The sequ- 
ence upon the death of a monster, in 
which its evil spirit rises to the heights is 
well done, and leaves the feeling of being 
in some hellish domain imprinted on the 
mind. 

The game offers an addictive and exciting 
excursion into tactical platform and lad- 



'extremely 
atmospheric ... 
superbly drawn' 



ders warfare and provides a forum for 
some exciting graphics and sprite manipu- 
lation. The soundtrack which is also avail- 
able on the loading screen is enjoyable 
and pleasant to the ear. I was most im- 
pressed with its save game facility for 
those ticklish times when mapping was 
dangerous and the lives left were dropping 
rapidly. As a small tip to any players the 
monsters do come buck if the screen is left, 
so it is worth repeat trips to easy monsters 
to boost the score and obtain bonus lives. 
Oh y^sl the major aim is to destroy all the 
generators with the laser, although the 
instructions do not actually say so. 
The game comes with two disks with a 
detailed instruction manual and It 
appears to work with most versions of ST. I 
did, though, discover that it did not want 
to run on an upgraded new 520STFM. 
That is a 1 meg drive 520 with an addi- 
tional half meg Ram implanted by the 
dealer, so beware it may not be totally 
compatible. 

Rtial comes well up to expectations and is 
well worth buying. 



GET DEXTER 

Mastertronic 
£19.99 



Reviewed by 
Ron Stewart 



One of the first laws in reviewing is to 
play the game until you have a good 
working knowledge and can write fairly 
about the product. But there comes a time 
in the life of every reviewer when he has to 
admit defeat like a gentleman and say 
that a game has beaten him 1 have found 
my nemesis in a game called Get Dexter. I 
have played this game for hours and have 
got absolutely nowhere, Now this could be 
a combination of things. It could be that 
I'm a bit thick and t just cannot get the 
hang of the game. It could be that the 
instructions for the game are worse than 
useless. Or it could be that the game is just 
unplayable. 

Get Dexter is a graphic adventure type 
game. Each scene is drawn in colourful 
isometric projection. You have control of 
Dexter, You hove to find the chamber of 




'I have got 
absolutely 

nowhere' 



Zarxas which apparently is a central con- 
trol computer. To gain access to the com- 
puter you will first have to get an eight 
figure code. Each figure in the code is 
known to scientists located somewhere 
within the complex and the scientists have 
to questioned using objects you can pick 
up in your travels. To help in your task is 
a podocephale that goes by the name of 
Xunk. Don't bother reaching for the dic- 
tionary it's not there! J can teil you that it 
looks like a heod perched on top of a foot. 
Where do they get them from? Vou now 



know as much as I do about the game for 
that is the limit of the instructions. 
In essence you have to control Dexter 
around a series of three- dimensional 
rooms- Dexter can jump r pick-up or drop 
objects, although he can only carry one 
object ut a time. Most of the items in a 
room can he moved r pushed or pulled. 
Dexter, who 1 assume is some sort of robot 
has an energy level. The energy level will 
decrease when he comes Lnto contact with 
the many weird and wonderful creatures 
that inhabit the rooms. Each room 
appears to be a puzzle in itself. For inst- 
ance, you want to get to that interesting 
object that is surrounded by broken glass? 
Then move some tables over the glass 
jump up on the tables and retrieve the 
object. There are many other things to 
work out as welL How do you open the 
sliding doors? What is the function of the 
coloured mats? How do you use the lift 
that gets you to the door that is suspended 
in space? 

All in all, there is probably a fair game 
fighting to get out, Li's just that you will 
have to persevere and fight to get in. A 
decent set of instructions would have hel- 
ped enormously, but then making people 
find out for themselves was probably the 
programmers intention, try it if you want 
to show that you are cleverer than I am ! 



62 Page 6 - Issue 3? 



ST GAMES ... ST GAMES ... ST GAMES.. 



VIRUS 

Firebird 
£19.95 



Reviewed by 
John Davison jnr 



You are the pilot of the latest generation 
of Hoverplane. and have been given orders 
to defend your country against the oncom- 
ing waves of attacking enemy spacecraft. 
The attacking alien force is intent on pol- 
luting the landscape by spraying It with a 
horrific red virus. 

Vims, which was initially seen qs the 
game 'Zarch 1 on the Acorn Archimedes, 
has been long awaited in other computer 
format^ as it is considered to be an in- 
novative piece of software. The action is 
set above a three dimensional landscape 
which smoothly scrolls by in whichever 
direction you pilot your hoverplane. 

Control of the Hoverplane is with either 
the keyboard or a combination of mouse 
and keyboard. The craft must be tilted in 
such a way that the thmster on its under- 
side can push it in the required direct ion. 
This is very difficult to master, and is 
made even more so by the fact that you 




have to compensate for inertia and 
gravity. 

As you move around the colourful patch- 
work landscape you will come across 
many trees., lakes and other such things, 
You will also encounter a number of diffe- 
rent alien space craft which must be des- 
troyed. To aid you in your navigation of 
the land you are assisted by a radar dis- 
play situated in the top left hand comer of 
the screen which, for me, did not really 
help. This was because I couldn't easily 
distinguish the coloured 'blips' indicating 
alien spacecraft from the green and blue 
background of the radar screen, 

Graphically the game is very impressive. 
The patchwork ground scrolls by extremely 
smoothly and r if you move a great dis- 
tance above the ground, the stars scroll by 
at different speeds giving an excellent 
three dimensional image. The space craft 



many ways of miniaturised versions of 

some of the craft in Elite. Many nice little 
features make the graphics just that bit 
better - for example there is a fixed light 
source and all shadows and highlights on 
objects in the game change in relation to it. 

In terms of sound the game is not terribly 
good. The occasional blip and blurp seems 
to be the sum total of the sound effects, 
which is a pity as considering the high 
quality of everything else, it does let the 
side down considerably. 

In conclusion 1 would ^ay that as a feat of 
programming Virus is superb, however i 
found it absolutely impossible to play and 
could not get along with the controls at 
all, it looks like being a real challenge. 
Visually the game is spectacular and a lot 
of work has obviously gone into it r but I 
cannot help feeling that all this is wasted 
because of the sheer difficulty of control. 



WHIRLIGIG 

Firebird 
£19.95 



Reviewed by 
John Davison jnr 



Whirligig is a vast network of mini uni- 
verses or 'eigenspaces' which are linked 
together by sturgates, The Whirligig itself 
consists of over four billion eigenspuces, 
most of which contain a number of star- 
gates which take you deeper into the 
Whirligig, Of the four billion or so sectors, 
there are five 'perfect 1 eigenspaees, or J per- 
fectspages' which contain one of the five 
'perfect solids', These solids are the key to 
your ultimate success in the game. 

Each of the solids has a form of J attractor' 
field around il and if you manoeuvre into 
this field you can collect the solid and take 
it through the siurgarc, It" you manage to 
find and capture all five of the solids, their 
combined power will create a timegate 
which takes you back to the golden age - 
1988AD3!! Throughout the eigenspaces you 
will come across hundreds of different 




'a masterpiece .„ 

visually spectacular... 

extremely playable' 

varieties of enemy spacecraft and also a 
variety of depots which will replenish your 
supplies of missiles, fuel, or chaff pods 
(defensive homing devices which destroy 
the nearest threat). 

The screen is a multidirectional scrolling 
affair with your large ship situated in the 
centre. If required, a control panel show- 
ing supply level indicators and a sector 
map can be scrolled up from the bottom of 
the screen. 

Control is via the mouse and is very 
simple to learn. Moving the mouse for- 
wards causes the ship to move in the direc- 



this makes control much easier and Ls 

most convenient. 

Graphically, the game is stunning. The 

objects and sprites on screen are all very 
large, colourful and amazingly solid look- 
ing. This "solid' look is achieved by some- 
thing known as 'Ughtsource 3D' r which 
shades ail of the objects with reference to a 
fixed lightsource. The result is really mag- 
nificent and gives the game a look of ex- 
treme quality. 

I he sound is also very good. The con- 
tinuous music, which can be switched off F 
is of excellent quality, being a memorable 

jolly" little tune which fits the game very 
well. The sound effects which are activated 
if the tune is turned off, consist mainly of 
feeble little explosions and gun shots. 
Although they are not that impressive they 
are adequate for the game. 

In my opinion Whirligig is a masterpiece. 
It is visually spectacular, extremely play- 
able, easy to control, and has a definite 
goal for you to strive for. I rate it as one of 
the few truly addictive games 1 have play- 
ed recently, and can quite honestly say it 
is one of Firebird's best releases to date. 



I'ucjf ft - Issue .4? 63 



ST GAMES ... ST GAMES ... ST GAMES.. S 



FLYING SHARK 

Firebird 
£24.95 



Reviewed by 
John Davison jrtr 



Flying Shark is a conversion of the arcade 
coin-op by Taita. Basically it is a vertical 
strolling shoot 'em up, very similar in style 
to the game '1942', which has teen seen 
in the arcades and on various other home 
computer formats. 

The scenario is fairly typical for this type 
of game. You r the great combat ace, must 
fly a lone mission behind enemy lines 
against overwhelming odds. Your aim is to 
win the battle and to ultimately save man- 
kind- Its not exactly the most original 
story for a game, is it? 
The game is for one player only and you 
control your biplane using the joystick for 
movement and machine yun fire, and the 
space bar to activate the 'smart r bombs. 
The view of the proceedings, as in most 
games of this type, is from above with you 
looking down on the battle beneath. You 
will fight against the enemy guns r fighter 
planes and tanks over a variety of bock- 




drops Including jungle scenes, bridges, riv- 
ers, and the sea. 

Various rewards are given for destroying 
certain 'waves' of enemy aircraft. For ex- 
ample, 1000 points are awarded for the 
destruction of a squadron of gold planes, 
extra fire power is given for destroying a 
red squadron and extra lives for a silver 
squadron. Extra J smart' bombs can be col- 
lected by flying above a 'B r symbol r 
In play, Flying Shark is fairly addictive 
and easy to get to grips with. The controls 
react well which makes the manoeuvrabil- 
ity of your plane quite considerable. As 
mentioned above, pressing the space bar 
fires a J smart' bomb which drops just in 
front of you and erupts into four spiralling 
fireballs which destroy anything in their 



path. This weapon must be used sparingly 
as you only have a limited supply, but 
they are very useful to get you out of a 
tight spot. 

The graphics are of a high quality being 
both bright and colourful and manage to 
catch the general feeling of the arcade 
original The scrolling is smooth, although 
I did notice the very slightest judder at 
limes. Animation of the various planes, 
tanks, and boats is also very good, being 
both fast and smooth. The background 
tune which piuys throughout the game is 
catchy and of considerable quality. 

Overall Flying Shark is an excellent 
arcade conversion and if you arc a fan of 
this type of game and want to play at 
home I can highly recommend It 



FOOTBALL 
MANAGER 2 

Addictive Games 
£19.95 



Reviewed by 
John S Davison 



Ever wanted to try your hand at manag- 
ing your favourite football team? Well 
now you can, a& Kevin Toms' classic foot- 
ball management simulation has made it 
onto the ST at last. 

As team manager you're responsible for 
producing a winning team and ensuring 
your club keeps a healthy bank balance. If 
you're good you could see your team rising 
to the top of the First Division winning 
cups and championships on the way. 
You start with £500,000 r sometimes more 
with sponsorships. This is used to pay 
players' wages, to caver club overheads, 
and to build up your squad by buying and 
selling players on the transfer market. You 
also get income from gate receipts; the 
more successful your team is, the more 
cash you get. Your bank balance is recal- 




culated each week of the season based on 
these transactions - if it's negative you're 
sacked! 

Before each match it's your job to pick the 
best team from your squad. This involves 
studying your players' attributes (position 
played, skill level, fitness level) and those 
of the opposition, matching your player* 1 
strengths against theirs and deciding the 
formation to play them in, it's also impor- 
tant to rest your players occasionally „ so 
their fitness level doesn't drop low enough 
for them to be judged unfit to play. 

Once a match begins you have no direct 
control over play, although you can call in 
substitutes and change your playing for- 
mation at half time. You see the giame as 
a series of animated action sequences, 
rather like edited highlights on TV, You 
watch from the stand as the players dash 



around the pitch, pacing, lobbing, tack- 
ling, and shooting at goaL The outcome of 
each interaction between players is de- 
cided on the basis of relative skills plus a 
random element (representing luck?). A 
sequence continues until the ball goes out 
of play, the goalie saves a shot, or a goal 
is scored. Following a goal you're shown 
an action replay from a vantage point 
behind the net. 

Graphics are nothing special, particularly 
the title screen and pitch backdrops, which 
are distinctly mediocre. There's no scroll- 
ing, the program switches between three 
separate screens depicting different parts 
of the pitch to keep up with the action. 
The player sprites (in team colours) are 
quite well animated, particularly the 
goalies who jig around in the goalmouth 
just like real goalies do. 
Sound is the worst I've ever heard on the 
ST, consisting of fust two different hissing 
noises representing crowd sounds,, and a 
click heard as the bail is kicked. Shame on 
you, Mr, Toms - if ever a game cried out 
for sampled sound it's this oneE 
I'm no football fan, but I actually enjoyed 
this game despite its failings. As with all 
goad simulations I soon found myself tot- 
ally absorbed by it and the desire to play 
just one more match was very strong, if it 
does this to me, then football enthusiasts 
should love it. 



£4 Page 6 - Issue 37 



ST GAMES ... ST GAMES ... ST GAMES... 



PUFFY'S SAGA 

UbiSoft 

£19.99 



Reviewed by 
Damon Howarth 



The presentation of this piece of Gallic 
software is colourful and cute, as is the 

underlying theme, A little ball (Puffy) has 
lost his girlfriend (Puffy n) in a dangerous 
maze-like castle full of power pills and 
mysterious treasures and monsters. Magic 
may be obtained therein to help (he Little 
ball on its way and the whole is joystick 
controlled, 

There are no obvious instructions in the 
box except for a colour scree nshot of the 
various monsters and goodies which in- 
habit the dungeon and no warning of the 
rather cute and innovative programming 
inside the game. The gameplay is, when 
stripped of its gloss, basically a Pacman/ 
Gauntlet mongrel and presents little more 
than original Gauntlet in challenge, but 
the gloss is what makes the game so 
appealing. 

On start up the player has the choice of 
the? mrilc or female blob, which have dil 




fering attributes,, that is the male is slow 
with a high hit and damage capacity 
while the female is swift but non violent. 
Whichever character is chosen a little 
■hello" emanates from the computer in 
sampled Franglais, This same voice adds 
helpful sound effects such as "yum-yum r 
whenever the food is eaten to B Ottehi B as 
damage is suffered by the hero(ine) and 
even offers helpful news such as "You will 
die!" Q5 energy is depleting. Fearsome roars 
emanate from the monsters and the occa- 
sional blob^ike giggle also reverberates 
through the maze as problems are over- 
come. This makes the game highly enjoy- 
able at first glance and for the initial hon- 
eymoon period it seems extremely enter- 
taining. Sadly it pales after long term 
playing. The whole experience is not dis- 
similar to the early talking Metros which 



at first were novel and subsequently some- 
what wearing as they told you that the car 
was in excess of economic speed or what- 
ever. 

The action seems to expect that the player 
is aware of the Gauntlet style game and 
does depend on disappearing walls and 
hordes of early ghosts to weaken the char- 
acters. It is unfortunate that this only ca- 
ters for single players as the combination 
of Puffy and Puffyn could have made a 
good co-operative game. Should the player 
wish to change role mid game then it 
takes one of the magic points that are 
collectable on route. The various magic 
functions do add something to playability 
and Offer a challenge to the imagination 
and deductive powers to discern what use 
any one piece of equipment or spell Is. 

The game is technically good coming on 
two disks in the boxed format and is com- 
patible with all versions of ST that I tried it 
on. The colours are vivid and the game- 
play normally more than adequate, 
although joystick responses became slower 
in busy screens. 

On the whole I felt that this was a gim- 
micky gome that is likely to sell well to 
impulse buyers or those who are happy to 
play only until the next new game comes 
along, I was not convinced that it had any 
lasting appeal 



PURPLE 
SATURN DAY 

Exxos 
£24.99 



Reviewed by 
John R. Bamsley 



This game was originally to have been 
called Art Attack, but it was apparently 
decided that this title may have led to 
confusion among the retailer^, believing it 

to be a computer*cjenerated art utility 

which it certainly isn'tl! 
The game is a little strange at first and 
takes quite some time to comes to terms 
with. The basic scenario is that once a 
year, on the planet Saturn, a galactic Au- 
rora Borealis occurs which turns the sur- 
rounding skies a shade of purple - hence 
the apt title. I o celebrate this phenome- 
non, an annual mini-olympiad of four 
challenging 'sporting' events is held an the 
Purple Day between the best specimens of 
the various races that inhabit neighbour- 
ing planets. Only ONE of these 'races' is 
human, the others comprising weird and 




wonder/ul creatures, all with varying 
strengths and weaknesses that will influ- 
ence your choice of opponent for each 
individual event. The gameplay is hectic 
and the accompanying graphics are su- 
perb! This software moy seem daunting at 
first but persevere and you won't regret it! 

One of the events Ring Pursuit, involves a 
race around the rings of Saturn, avoiding 
meteors, whilst quietly and efficiently 
nudging your opponent into their path - 
your task being to pass on the correct side 
of the orbiting satellites as you race 
around. Another event is Tronic Slider 
which is a type of energy-hunt based with- 
in the confines of an extra-terrestrial box- 
ing ring which is itself festooned with a 
series of shimmering monoliths to dodge 
and scoot around. 

Time Jump has you attempting to cata- 



pult yourself the farthest distance/time 
into the future, while Brain Blower places 
you within on exploded brain with your 
objective being to fight and reactivate your 
particular cerebral hemisphere before your 
opponent activates his!! 

On the final screen, the overall winner of 
the tournament gets to sort of 'unite' (well 
it is French!!) with a beautiful female life 
form. The resultant offspring from this en- 
counter appears on screen which you can 
then save to disk! 

Purple Saturn Day may be loosely classi- 
fied as a cross between Arcade/Simulation/ 
Strategy but that would bely the truly 
magnificent mixture of colour and intri- 
gue, together with smooth and effective 
gameplay, that this package certainly is. 

EXXOS is the new arm of ERE Infoimati- 
que, the French software house which pro- 
vided us with games such as Spidertronic 
and Macadam Bumper, As a point of in- 
terest, the name EXXOS has Greek roots - 
'EXO' meaning OUT which is the opposite 
of J ESO' signifying the internal and hid- 
den! The choice of label title reflects the 
ultimate aim of the software producers 
which is total universal communication as 
seen in the first release on the EXXOS label 
- Captain Blood. A little bird tells me that 
the follow-up to Purple Saturn Saturn Day 
is provisionally titled Temple Of The Flying 
Saucers!! 



Page 6 - Issue 37 



65 



ST GAMES ... ST GAMES ... ST GAMES 



MENACE 
Psygnosis/ 
Psyc lapse 
£19.99 



Reviewed by 
fohn Davison jnr 



Menace is the latest release from Psygno- 
sis, who are noted for their titles of ex- 
treme quality. Menace is no exception, as 
it is a truly stunning game. 

Bas kally it is a horizontally scrolling 
shoot 'em up, similar in style to the arcade 
game 'Nemesis', You must pilot a small 
fighter craft through the defences of the 
planet Draconiu. On the planet you must 
navigate your way through various sec- 
tions to destroy the most feared rulers in 
the galaxy. These ruler* apparently rav- 
aged and plundered space for many years 
and have been exiled from their home 
galaxy to the unnatural mutated planet of 
Dracoma. You have been sent to avenge 
the deaths of those killed in the past by 
totally annihilating the planet. 

Along your journey through the puusages 
of Druconia you encounter many different 



^■^^■M 




^—**—*4M* 



alien lifeforms who are sent to attack you. 
If you manage to destroy a wave of these 
alien* you are presented with an icon, 
which, if shot at a number of times, cycles 
through a selection of different weapons 
and features. These items, which can be 
picked up by flying the ship over the icon, 
include lasers, cannons, shields, 'outriders' 
and a 'speed up r feature which enables 
your craft to manoeuvre with greater ease 
and speed. 



To complete a level of the game, the 
enormous creature or spacecraft found at 
the end of the level must be destroyed by 
shooting it a great number of times. 
Whilst attempting to do this you are utter- 
ly bombarded with enemy fire. 

As you would expect from Psygnosis the 
graphics in Menace are absolutely superb. 
They are very colourful and would pass in 
an arcade! The end of level sequences with 
the large enemy creatures are especially 
impressive. The animation of your craft 
and the alien creatures is extremely 
smooth, as is the scrolling, which although 
very slow is of a very high standard. 

Music and sounds within the game are 
also very good. The continuous tune 
throughout the game (which can be 
switched off if required) is pleasing to the 
ear and very catchy, Sound effects are few 
and far between because of the presence of 
the music, however there is a certain 
amount of digitised speech which informs 
you in a very smooth calm voice of 
oncoming danger and of the weapon 
which you have just picked up r 

Overall Menace is a superb game which 
is impressively presented. The graphics are 
beautifully drawn and the sound is ex- 
tremely good. Menace also excels in terms 
of payability, it is a highly addictive 
game with enough variety for you to keep 
wanting to come back for more. It is defi- 
nitely the best game to come from Psy gno- 
sis since Burba rion. 



MINDFIGHTER 

Abstract Concepts/ 

Activision 

£24.99 



Reviewed by 
fohn Sweeney 



Mindfighter follows the adventures of an 
eleven-year old boy whose amazing 
psychic powers have resulted in his mind 
being trapped in a nightmare vision of the 
future - lost in the ruins of Southampton 
after a nuclear war has devastated the 
world. You must first survive long enough 
to gather sufficient information about 
what has happened to enable you to 
change the future, then find a way to 
return to the present so that you can use 
the information. 

The game is a text adventure with pic- 
tures which comes nicely packaged with a 
poster and a ISO-page novel of the same 
title. It starts well enough and appears to 
have great promise, the moody pictures 
and detailed text set the scene of a post- 




holocaust future very well. As you wander 

the ruined streets of Southampton various 
grisly events occur - "Slowly, with a blunt 
knife, the guard began to saw the man r s 
hand off"! - and you start to encounter 
various problems - how to survive noxious 
vapours and attacks from enemy guards, 
how to get through the electric fence or get 
past the guards to the ship. 
Unfortunately things don't go well from 
there. The 'advanced parser' isn't very adv- 
anced and the vocabulary is rather li- 
mited. Most sentences get the standard, 
boring response THAT WASNT POSSIBLE. 
Mindfighter understands very few of the 
words it uses in its description s, but you 
must try all of them since occasionally 
there IS one you have to use. For example 
after trying EXAMINE RUE RLE in eight dif- 
ferent places and being told ROBIN 



COULDN'T EXAMINE THAT you might be 
forgiven for believing t hut it was not valid 
- wrong! - you can EXAMINE RUBBLE in 
one location (but only once!) to discover 
something! 

More problems occur when you solve a 
problem and try to tell the game what you 
want to do - ut one point I had to try eight 
different ways of typing in the solution 
before I found one that it understood. 

Then there is the book. If you read it first 
then it gives rather too much a way, But if 
you DON'T read it you will not be able to 
solve some of the puzzles^ For example, to 
pass the fence you need one of Robin's 
psychic powers, but there is no way you 
can guess what it is without reading the 
book. Even then your chance of working 
out exactly how to invoke the power is 
virtually zero. Stuck? Try LQKDOfi. KROG 
HAKDOH. PHWDPRUSK HDJOH (take 3 off 
each letter and don't drink any water!}. 

The game runs from memory so response 
times are very good. But it was written for 
a number of machines and herein lies a 
major part of the problem: the conversion 
to the ST was done by people outside the 
author's control and was not to his liking, 
furthermore the testing was completely in- 
adequate and they are planning to shoot 
the play testers". Abstract Concepts are 
hoping to rectify this with their next 
adventure - Parisian Knights. 



66 



Page 6 - lssu« 37 



• •• 




£^FROM A PILOrSNQTEBOOK 



f* 




- AS SOON AS I PRESSED THE MOUSE BUTTON I 
KNEW I HAD TROUBLE ~ a pair ofHASSLERS appeared 
promptly ami slammed in to me, One life gone and Hi tie to 
show. 



To show who was in charge I a ccelerated towards the descending 
LANDERS and wrote several of them off- then came the cry for 



help - a LLAMA had been nabbed by one, Of course it was far off r on 

the edge of the SCANNER - I accelerated towards if, ducking and \ 

weaving and luckily destroying an II A CD** on the way. When I got *^-^ 



there I carefully shot the lander, caught the llama and put it down on 
the surf ace r protecting myself with a dab of SHIELD. I 



No relief- 1 had run into a bunch of seeded mines and an NPB* was 



right ahead. I punched CONTROL for the SMART BOMB but too 
late, second ship gone. 



My survival into the next wave was in doubt - time to Sharpen 
Up! As my third ship rezzed in, a MUTANT and a couple of 
HOVERDRONES appeared - this time the SMART did its stuff. 



I had a second to breathe, study the Scann er and decide where 



the most urgent threat was* 



-* 



Then, two more cries for help, nearer this time and close toge ther, 
Flying now by instinct I managed to rescue both llamas at once. 



aSWas 



Wonderful - until the MOTHER SHIP zapped me, They fell to their 



deaths, from a great height, Six more to die and we'd lose the planet 



and plunge into a fight in Deep Space. 



No time to worry - two SFORES appeared right ahead - a second 



Smart saw them off. The next few sees were pretty productive 



suddenly the Scanner began to clear but what was this - something 
coming at me FA STl Turned out to be a KU SSTOMBL YTTER ant 



it didn't like me. I tr ashed it wit h my shield on qn a well-aimed htest 



and so into the next wqve six of my llamas (ntact. 



Have a Crummy Day' - Mine Seeder 
** Nasty Pulsating Blob' 



ANDES ATTACK and GRIDRUNNER, soon! 

for the ATARI ST £9.95 

from your retailer or direct from LLAMASOFT 




49 MOUNT PLEASANT TAD LEY HANTS RG26 6BN Tel 07356 4478 





With the tremendous success of Dungeonmoster lost 
year, there ho* been an upsurge in arcade style 
versions of Fantasy Role Ploying variants. Both SSI 
and Origin have produced many successful FRP games over 
the years, notably the Wizard's Crown series and the Phanta- 
sie series from SSI and the Ultima series from Origin, so it is 
not surprising to find them both putting out new FRP-style 
games, but with simple joystick controls and lots of arcade- 
style fights to try and entice more gamesplayers into sam- 
pling the delights of FRP. 

The games have a number of similarities: you need to 
explore your surroundings - but don't need to map very much 
of it; you have to fight your way around - arcade style? there 
are items to find and user if you press the space bar you get 
access to a menu for extra commands such as casting spells 
and using items - in Heroes it is a text menu across the 
middle of the screen, in Times it is icons along the bottom of 
the screen; and to win you must fulfil a quest. In Heroes the 
quest is to kill a Dragon and retrieve the treasure It is 
guarding; Times is more subtle, you will be given quests 
along the way and don't discover your true objective until 
well into the game. 

So how do they differ? The first obvious difference is the 
viewpoint. In Heroes you get a cutaway view of the corridor 
or tunnel you are in and a side view of your current hero, in 
Times you get a Gauntlet-style overhead view of your charac- 
ter's head. 

The second obvious difference is in the fighting, in Times 
you fust face the right way and press the button - a few blows 
kills just about anything, in Heroes you get rather more 
options. Heroes has two modes of fighting - Ranged Combat 
and Close Combat. Once you get within a quarter of a screen 
width of any enemy you are automatically placed in Close 
Combat mode which, provided you keep the button pressed 
allows you to thrust (high, centre or lew), dodge or back 
away; releasing the button allows you to run! If you are 
further away you are in Ranged Combat mode and if the 
character you are currently using has a ranged weapon - bow 
and arrow, spear, magic staff r etc. - then you can use the 
joystick to attack with it aiming high, low or centre. 
You start Times of Lore by choosing whether you want to be 
a Knight., a Valkyrie or a Barbarian and stay as that one 
character for the whole game. To begin with you have a 
sword and can only hack monsters from close up - later yau 
may find a couple of better weapons - your best weapon is 
automatically thrown if you press the button while you are 
outside close combat range. 

In Heroes you have eight characters from the Dragonlance 
books in your party, each with different abilities and 



HEROES OF THE LANCE 

SSI/U.S. Gold 

ST only -£24.95 



REVI E 



TIME ON 

HERC 

John Sweeney explores two iww F 



weapons, but r apart from using the space bar to coll up a 
menu and get one of the other characters to cast a spell, only 
the current leader can actually fight. The graphics qt^ superb 
as your chosen leader leaps or glides across the screen, 
weapon swinging and cloak flying, and with so much choice 
in the character and associated weaponry this aspect of the 
gome is truly excel lent, 

In both games spells may be cast at any time. In Heroes, 
Goldmoon and Raistlin both have magic, Goldmoon has a 
choice of niae Clerical Spells ranging from Cure Light 
Wounds (costs one point of energy) to Deflect Dragon Breath 
(costing ten) which she can cast with her Blue Crystal Staff. 
The staff starts with around 165 points of energy and is 
recharged whenever an enemy magic user is throwing spells 
at the party (she doesn't need to be the leader). Raistlin has a 
choice of eight spells such as Charm, Magic Missile and 
Detect Invisible using his nun rechargeable Staff of Magius - 
well seven actually, Final Strike always kills the party r not a 
lot of use!. Apparently it was intended as some sort of joke, I 
didn't find it very funny! 

In Times, you have to find scrolls in order to cast spells and 
since you are not very good at reading arcane script you have 
to deduce their effects by observation - so 1 won't spoil your 
fun by telling you what they do] 

Superficially, Heroes of the Lance would appear to be a 
far superior game, having very impressive graphics 
and a much wider range of fighting and spells, howev- 
er, if you actually play the games for more than half an 
hour, you soon find that the difference Is indeed superficial. 
Heroes seems to me to be a superb new games-system (albeit 
with a few rough edges [) looking for a game! Times on the 
other hand is a complete game with lots of subquests to hold 
your interest. 

The fighting in both gomes soon starts to pa.lL In Times, 1 
found it a trifle simplistic - but then it is an arcade game. In 
Heroes, once you have learnt a few basic techniques, like how 
far away from an enemy you have to be to hit it with your 
sword, and which monsters you should Sleep, Web or Charm 
at once, there is not much that can stand up to your party - 
even the Wraith (second most valuable in points terms) ju$t 
stands there and lets yau hack it to pieces without any 
danger to your party] Once you have discovered an effective 
way to deal with a particular monster it always works - the 
only challenge comes when they attack in groups, but then 
you just take a bit of damage and heal up afterwards. 
As for finding and using items in Heroes, it just isn't worth 
the bother. Treasures are practically worthless - the best 1 
found was only worth 50 points - kill one harmless Wraith 
and you get 5751 New weapons can't be used! Rings and 
Strength Potions had little discernible effect, And you can't 
search the whole place for Invisible items because Raistlin 
doesn't have enough energy. 
Heroes is also disappointingly short. After exploring the 



68 Page 6 - Issue 37 



VIEW 



MLY FOR 




i ne w Fantasy Role Playing games 



multiple dungeons of a Phantasie, the multi-level dungeon of 
Dungeon Master, or the multiple, multi- level dungeons of an 
Ultima, I was most surprised to meet the Dragon on the 
second level in Heroes of the Lance! Admittedly there is ut 
least one other route down Ihere, but I still thought it rather 
a small dungeon for the price. 1 had just mastered the games- 
system and was looking forward to playing the game when it 
came to an end! The game is rather unbalanced and your 
characters much too powerful - you can actually complete 
the whole game using only two of your characters, without 
picking up any items, in less than fifteen minutes! The only 
hard bit is working out the one and only exact way of killing 
the Dragon - a slight bug at this point allows you to get past 
her head and stand unscathed between her head and body 
while she breathes flame into empty space - if you get there, 
be sure to turn around as her body is invulnerable! 
There are lots of little things wrong, some of tbem probably 
intentional in order to provide a simple arcade game, but 
they are nonetheless annoying. You cant tell whether or not 
you have succeeded in casting spells such as Prayer (nor what 
effect it has"), or how much power you have left in your 
staffs r or whether shields have any use, or how many arrows 
you have left, or which scroll is which and so on. 

Heroes of the Lance is fun to play and has great 
graphics, but is definitely an introductory game - 
and as such 1 believe rather overpriced. Just in cose 
you are after a high score, here are the points (I really don't 
understand an arcade' game where it is almost impossible to 
work out where the points come fromf): Baaz B2; Troll 525; 
Spectral 120; Aghar 14; Spider 31 5 r Bozak 175; Wraith 575; 
Aghar Lrg 28; Men 2(* Hatchling 600; Khisanth 2000; Shield 
or Gem 10; Coins 20; Silver Chalice or Bar 30; Cold Chalice 
40; Hunting Knife (use Detect Invisible just inside the first 
doorway) r Gold Bar or Longs word 50; Disks 10,000! You also 
get 2000 points for each survivor. USEFUL TIP: once you have 
copied the diskettes, erase FORMA TTOS from the one you are 
going to play with and you will have space to SAVE without 
changing disks. Even better, if you have a double-sided drive, 
format a diskette to two sides, with ten sectors per track and 
copy all the files from the B and C diskettes (except FORMAT- 
.TOS) to it. You can then play the whole game with NO disk 
changes! 

Let's go back lo Times of Lore. Although the fighting and 
spells are limited, this is a much better rounded gome. You 
wake from a good night % rest and go downstairs to the bar 
for your breakfast beer. Here you encounter a Prior who asks 
you if you would seek out a gang of ores in the Dark Forest 
who have stolen the Foretelling Stones. Being a hero you 
naturally agree and head off to the North, The land you are 
in is mat her extensive, but fortunately the game comes com- 
plete with a map showing the major roads, rivets, deserts r 
mountains and buildings. You will need to make notes as you 
find your way through the forests, locate ruins deep in the 




desert, search for the buildings NOT shown on the map and 
explore a couple of small dungeons, but detailed map mak- 
ing skills are not required. 

Unlike Heroes, where they apply the simple philosophy of 'if 
it moves kill it', in Times you can and must converse with the 
locals. This is done using the joystick to select keywords from 
■a list maintained by the computer, bused on what you have 
heard during previous conversations. As you complete quests 
and converse with the inhabitants you will be given new 
quests and hear strange rumours, most of which are well 
worth following up. (Just in case you get as frustrated as I 
did, ONE of the rumours is NOT true!) You need information 
and magical artefacts from various subquests in order to 
complete the game - around a dozen tasks in all - and you 
will also have to solve a few little puzzles, enough to keep 
you busy for some time, 

The box actually says 200-300 hours of playing time. 
This is a gross overstatement. That is the sort of time 
it takes to play Ultima IV. Times of I ore is much 
shorter. 1 donl think I took more than about 20 or 30 hours. 
Some of the time is actually wasted by the response time on 
the icons - it can take up to 10 seconds just to select PAUSE 
from the menu! Why do programmers insist on building 
delays into their software? It can also take some time to get 
around, especially on the earlier versions. I had problems 
with the RETURN TO TIMES OF LORE option and with un- 
wanted re-boots OS 1 entered a pub to SA Vt, so 1 got a new 
copy from Microprose and found that they had speeded up 
the character movement by around 30 or 40%. Once you find 
the Magic Boots the game then gets up to a reasonable speed. 
(If you want to know which version you have, check the dates 
of the files on the disk my new copy has 1989 dates.) 
It still has a few bugs (e.g. the dungeons may be deserted, 
and the LOAD GAME option doesn't appear to reset the 
luminance so that as night falls you end up with a complete- 
ly black screen!) but not enough to spoil the game, 1 also got 
a little frustrated with the controls - it is far too easy to 
accidentally hold the button down a fraction too long as you 
leave a menu and then find that you have hit one of the 
locals unintentionally! This means that no-one will talk to 
you so you can r t even SAVE your position because that re- 
quires you to talk to the landlord r If this happens you can 
either go to another town, or wait till midnight when r I am 
told, "the apathy flags are reset"! 

Heroes of the Lance, with its connections to TSRs phenomen- 
ally successful Dragonlance and its excellent graphics will 
undoubtedly do well, but if you can't afford both I would 
choose Times of Lore as a more complete introduction to 
computer Fantasy Role Playing, 



TIMES OF LORE 

Origin/Microprose 
ST only -£24.95 




Page 6 - Issue 57 69 



HEADCOACH 



Do you need all the glitz and glamour currently 

surrounding the ST? Damon Howarth finds a thinking 

game where strategy is more important than looks 



Superbowl has been and gone, the 
San Francisco 49ers are the new 
world champions having just 
beaten the Ci adnata Bengals and the 
Schoburg Franklins dropped out in the 
wild card game, fust u minute the Scho- 
burg who? 

This is not the world of Gridiron seen 
earlier this year but a computer manage- 
ment and play simulation produced by a 
small software house new to the ST but 
well known in BBC circles. Qualsoft pro 
duced the first version of Head Coach for 
the BBC some yeara ago and only on the 
realisation of the owners that 16 bit was 
taking off did they attempt the conversion. 
They started on soccer management 
games and then proceeded to use that 
expertise on a statistically correct Gridiron 
management system. 
The game comes on two single sided disks 
with a manual giving full instructions and 
history of the initial forty-five team mem- 
bers. You take the part of the Head Coach 
of the Franklin Schoburgs a team taking 
over the franchise of one of the NFL teams 
and falling into their season 's schedule. It 
is necessary for you to muke all the deci- 
sions as to starting line up players and 
tactics for each of the matches in that 
season. It is your responsibility to call 
which of the great range of Offensive and 
Defensive plays best compliments the 
strengths of your team, This of course has 
earlier been determined in the training 
camp section and the two pre -season 
matches. 
Once you have completed a match there 



coda mum 



SCHOBURG SEATTLE 



Wt FWNELEIIS IttlE PQBSE5S1GM 



FOURTH MP IB 



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H+ 4»i« t 1 i i I I 



follows a results sequence 
consisting of all the 

teams in the NFL r a table 
showing the standings 
and then which, if any, 
of the team were injured. 
Finally the computer will 
inform you who your 
three most valuable 
players were that week. 
This happens each week 
for the sixteen week sea- 
son and then if you have 
qualified for the play offs 
your contract is assured 
for the next season and 
you can try to win a Superbowl, Should 
you fail to reach the Play Offs your per- 
formance is assessed and your con tract is 
either renewed or terminated. There is an 
end of season sequence and you go to the 
draft for the next season. This carries on 
ad infinitum until you are discharged. 
Since one game takes about thirty to forty 
minutes to play it can be seen that a 
season can last many hours and there is 
therefore a save option after any game has 
completed. 

The game has a very realistic feel to 
it and those people who have even 
the slightest knowledge of the game 
through Channel Four will find In stimu- 
lating while those who understand the 
game more will enjoy the varied play catl- 
ing in the system. It is not a game with 
state of the art graphics or sound, It relies 
on the solid game content within its struc- 
ture. The screens are mostly textual 

although there is 
a gridiron on 
screen with field 
position marker 
during the 

games. The 

strength of this 
program is in the 
involvement the 
Coach feels with 
the team, mem- 
bers become 
heroes and 

friends. There is 
a genuine 

wrench when 
players of six 
and seven sea- 





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sons standing are Cut for new blood and 
the general expectation of your star play- 
ers to pull you through in crunch situa- 
tions involves you more as the game prog- 
resses rather than less. 

s far as I know the game is only 
available by mail order since 
Qualsoft feel that the lack of a 
glitzy image would act against it on the 
market place. From my point of view the 
game has kept me sitting up at nights and 
through holidays and weekends for up to 
twelve hours at a stretch, with miniscule 
breaks for food or other necessities. The 
game does not pre lend to utilise the 
machine to its full capacity, even the 
mouse is not supported, but I forgive it a 
great deal because of the sheer friendliness 
of Ljume play. 

The t)j>ennes5 of the program allows it to 
be transferred to RAM disk or to a one meg 
disk and to be run from any drive, with 
subsequent gains in access time. The game 
will work just as well in mono as in colour, 
either on a colour monitor or TV. If you 
want to use your computer in conjunction 
with your brain rather than just a picture 
gallery, this is the type of program that 
might interest you. It is a game I have no 
hesitation in recommending to anyone 
with even the slightest interest in Amer- 
ican Football, * 



HEADCOACH V3 

Published by QUALSOFT, 
18, Hazlemere Road, 
Stevenage, SG2 8RX 
Price: £19.95 



70 



Page 6 - Issue 37 



ve a say. 



Prospero C - The Verdict 

We thought you might be tired of us talking about Prospero C so we're letting somebody else ha 

First Stephen Hill of 'ST User" (from his Stephen seems to know our products Probe the source level debugger is 

review Feb 89): we ll t I wonder how? something I dreamed of years ago, and at 

Prospero' s Workbench sets a standard of As usual, Prospero has really excelled last it is possible on ike ST. being able to 

userfnendlinessyet to be surpassed.. I am itself with the documentation. watch your code execute will at least 

forced to resort to sheer nit picking to find double your productivity. 

f a u "■ R u t wi II anyone buy it? 

Prospero has concentrated heavily on the He also concluded in a way that many 

A nice editor is all very well Stephen but user interface andhasproducedone of the professional developers for the ST now 

can you use the compiler? few packages which / would actively conclude, 

I encountered no trouble whatsoever recommend to the complete beginner. At Prospero C will in future be my 

compiling any of my own programs... the same time the promise of complete compiler of choice on the Atari ST 

Prospero has obviously taken a great deal ANSI C will undoubtedly extend its ft supplies what I need 

of trouble to simplify the process of attraction to more advanced 

linking your C programs as much as programmers, 
possible. 

Matthew Jones of 'Page 6 1 gave us some 
But even reviewers write programs with constructive criticism of which we have Demonstration disks are available for 
bugs! How did you get on with probe? taken due note, he did however get a little those who don' t even trust the reviewers 
Probe remains the best debugging aidl've excited by probe {from his review of The cost of Prospero C is £129,95 
so far seen, its accessible enough for the Prospero C in the Feb/March 89 issue): (including VAT), 
total beginner to use and yet at the same -■-* g~ ~ 

'Z^i;^ ^^^^ Pro spero Software 



in a 

compiler - ANSI standard, an 
integrated environment and source 
level debugging. 



^LANGUAGES FOR MICROCOMPUTER PROFESSIONALS 

190 CASTEUVAU F LONDON SW13 9DR, ENGLAND TBI, 01-741 S531 TELEX S8I43SJ6 



ATARI ST SUPERDEALS 



520 STFM SUPER PACK 

£349.00 

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* Organiser Business Software including WORDPROCES- 
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REMEMBER! Many STs do not come with BASIC, ours come 
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1040 STFM SUPER PACK 

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As 520STFM Superpack hut with 1 meg 1040STFM 



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Page 6 - Issue 37 71 



ARE YOU MISSING OUT? 

You W got lots ol que&tiors about your computer but don't 
know who to ask* We do! You're- noi $vm. which software is best 
^ far y^ur application ! We do! You 'd like to keep up to date with 
"• new rela&se* and be sure they are a gocid buy, but who"* raping to 
lell you? We wrill! You would love to gat to know other Alan 
enthusiasts, bul you don't know how! We do 1 You want to yet 
some of that Tubhe Domain' software youW heard about, but 
where from? We know! You don't want to leel like you're ihtr 
only Aiari owner in the wurid, but where can k/qu Lum loo! Well, 
we can help! Greal, bul who are you?? 

We are the large&t [and otde&L( Atari Computer Owner* Club 
In ihe U.K. For just £5.00 per year you get hdp, assistance, hints, 
tips, friend*, pen pals, access to PD software, up to dale 
in tarrnaiion, games, utilities, hardware project*., software 
reviews, programming tutorials, and a glossy club magazine 
ev^ry quarter. 

A club magazine 35 well!!" One ot thos-e photocooied things 
that is unreadable, eh! Well no, it's professionally produced, just 
like thus magazine you're readmu.. It's called MONITOR, you may 
ha^e heard of it? Yes, friends of mine have read i1 and say ii's 
greal! How do I join the club and oel my copy of MONITOR? 
Easy just send a cheque or postal order for £5.(10 to the address 
below requesting a four issue subscription. Overseas 
membership t& £8-00 (surface) or £12.00 (Airmail). 

You won't be disappointed!! 

The U.K. Atari Computer Owners Club 
P.O. Box 213 f Southend-on-Sea 5 Essex, SS1 20F 

Independent U$&r Group 



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NOW AVAILABLE 

CLIP ART 2 

for use with Fleet Street, Timeworks, Easy- 
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Hundreds MORE images on four disks in compressed 
format with full instructions on conversion to use in 
the most popular programs 

All Images are in the public domain and may be freely 
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FOUR DISK collection just £10! 

CLIP ART COLLECTION 1* still available at £10 
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"These disks are also available as part of the PAGE 6 ST LIBRARY, 
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P.P.S. This advertisement was produced using an Atari ST. 



Create superb quality animated graphics with 
Sprite Master- the ultimate Sprite designer for 
the professional and amateur programmer. 



languages Supported: GFA Basic, Hisoft/Power Basic 

Fast Basic, STOS Bask, Assembler and C 

Editing Functions: Draw, line, hex, circle, fill, copy, 

overlay, enlarge, reduce, scroll, flip, set palette, set size, 

rotate, grab , outline, exchange colour, undo, test, 

Other Features 

Sprite Size: Adjustable from 

8 x 8 up to 144 x 84 pixels. 

Load Screen: NEOchrome, 

Degas, Degas Elite, Paintworks, 

Advanced Art Studio, etc. 

Comprehensive Manual: 

With full technical information 

on the use of Sprite Master 

sprites. 



«■ 



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72 



Page 6 - liiue 37 



BITS 

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: - - f: ■'■ ;: , : 



SPRITE MASTER 



Damon Howarth finds an easy way to design sprites 
and get them to run in several languages 



One of the more annoying factors 
of the majority of languages for 
the ST is that they da not provide 
easy programming qt designing of 
sprites. Unlike certain other 16 bit 
machines the ST is not blessed 
with hardware sprite creation or 
even a user defined graphics func- 
tion, which makes life difficult for 
would be programmers not fluent 
in C or Assembler. Fortunately 
though many third parties have 
created sprite designers to fill the 
gap, but unfortunately many of 
these have been either language 
specific or extremely difficult to in- 
corporate into u program. Now 
Animatic claim to have brought 
out a designer that is compatible 
with a wide range of languages 
and is capable of producing good 
animation as well. 

For those who may not know a 
sprite is a figure which the compu- 
ter can move about (for example 
the ball in Arkanold orthespace- 
man and creatures in Baal) and 
sprites are the mainstay of the vast 
majority of games, so it was with 
interest I tried out Sprite Master, It 
claims compatibility with Fast 
Basic, GFA Basic, HI soft /Power Basic, 
Assembler, C and STOS. A creditable 
achievement indeed. 

The utility comes in an attractive box 
together with one disk and a fairly com- 
prehensive manual. The whole runs in low 
resolution only, which is, in general, fair 
enough since most games are in that 
mode anyway. To create a sprite is a fairly 
simple task, the whole package is mouse 
driven from the loading screen. 

A row of icons give access to the various 
functions which allow various loading and 
saving functions and access to the toolbox, 
which is a comprehensive collection of uti- 
lities, the draw mode, a testing mode, cre- 
dits and quit. These can also be accessed 
via the function keys for added conveni- 
ence. The manual briefly explains the con- 
cept of animation, which will be readily 
understandable to anyone who drew run- 
ning dots on the comers of schoolbooks 
when young. It also gives a good guide to 




the use of the drawing program which is 
not unlike Neochrome in format. Colour 
swapping, copying and pallette creation 
are all accounted /or r as are various cut 
and paste routines. Each step of the sprite 
is drawn on this and then inserted into the 
relevant space or step in the program for 
later use. The 'copy to next frame' func- 
tion is useful here since It allows for corn- 
patibility of style. 

The disk contains several example flies 
showing how to run the resultant sprite in 
the various basics, and it is a simple matter 
to alter these to suit any new sprite that 
is made. These are somewhat useful as a 
demo of programming difficult concepts in 



SPRITE MASTER 
Published by Soft Bits 
Price £24.95 



various languages. There is also a 
picture grabber and compacter on 
the disk so that Neo and Degas 
format pictures may be cut and 
compiled into sprite format 
another useful aid for those who 
find drawing a problem. There is 
even an ASCII converter to make 
any sprite you design compatible 
with low level languages for man- 
ipulation, 

The. package was surprisingly 
friendly to use and once the actual 
mechanism for placing drawings 
into frames was mastered it did 
not take long to create a simple 
bouncing amoeba, I tried this with 
the supplied demo program for 
GFA and FAST Basics and was 
pleased to see that it worked very 
swiftly in totally compatible mode. 
Having tried to use sprites in these 
;U*^| two languages before, Sprite Mas- 
ter scored top marks with for this. 
The claimed compatibility with 
STOS though is a little of a cheat. 
To utilise the package's sprites in 
this it is necessary to grab ready 
saved sprites made by Sprite Mas- 
ter via the STOS sprite grabber. Yes 
you can use Sprite Master to run 
on STOS but there seems little point as it 
does not offer any significant advantage 
over that package's excellent creation faci- 
lities. Indeed tis. Sprite Master is only about 
five pounds cheaper than STOS I can see 
it being of little value to owners of that 
software. For others though it is a worth- 
while experience and may solve many 
frustrations for them. Unlike many other 
sprite editors, Sprite Master does not just 
leave you with a bunch of sprites and let 
you figure out how to use them in your 
program, The examples given in various 
different languages are very useful for 
those who are not already totally profi- 
cient in their chosen language. Assembler 
programmers may not need such help but 
those who program in any of the BASICS 
listed might find the hints a blessing. 
On the whole 1 would recommend Sprite 
Master to all but STOS users who are in- 
terested in expanding their programming 
abilities with their favourite languages. * 

Page 6 - Issu* 37 73 



RESOURCE FTLE 



The Resource File ii a service prx.1vkU.1J 
by PAGE 6 to help Atari owners find 
sources of information, help and sup- 
ply. An entry In this feature does not 
necessarily Imply any endorsement by 
PAGE 6. The retailers shown are those 
wh& are known tfl hove supported 
Atari hn-.vurnt- time nu1 rhinos change 
arid r^d^ns are udviiwd w dwelt for 
tiifCOttlVtt to ensure ihul the infor- 
mation is still current. We would ask 
any readers who* find information re 
lie Inaccurate! or out of date to let us 
\naw so that on entry may he- amen* 
ded Or deleted. 



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I fflQn 

FcL 0752 26S276 

A.S. WGOTTON&SON 

116 r Ldleslon Rotid 

Crewe 

CW2 7IID 

Tel. 0270 21411ft 

YORK COMPUTER CENTRE 

9, Davygote Arcade 

Uuvyaotfi 

York " 

YOl 25U 

Tel. 0904 &41862 



ABC 

Contort Mike Ddnogtiue. 1^5. Si, 
Leonards Road. Leicester, LE2 3Bi. Tel. 
0533 700 190. Retailer and both 3-bit 
and ST user groups. 

A.*: i:. USI K C.HCHJF 
Contact Martin Stiurpe, Z3. Brooklyn 
Court, Biadiord Road, deckli-calon. 
West Vorks r BD19 4TJ. Tel. 0274 H5I.131 
(24 hours). Monthly meetings, newslet- 
ter, trips, discounts etc. 

A, IL G, (IRELAND) 

Camatf Mike Coxy, 3, St. Kevins, Park, 
Kilmuuuid. Cy. Dublin. Ireland. Til. 01 
631330 or BB5 01 B3563<! (24 hours). 
Monthly meetings and newsletter. 

BESTWOOD 8-BIT USER 

GROUP 

Contact Duvidl Taylor, GO Steven holrne 

CrcsucnL. B*5tWOOd Park, NotCinyhtirn. 

NG5 5FW, Tel. 0602 209735. 8-bit lotul 

users only 

BOURNEMOUTH AND POOLE 
ATARI USER CROUP 
Contact Colin Hunt. 2^ A, Wiinbfwne 
Rood, OflkJoh-. Pool*. Dorasl STr&bit, 
haidwcint' and software development. 

BURV ST. EDMUNDS USERS 
GROUP 

Contort Gary nrummruje, 22 P Ridley 
Road, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, ii'.ti 
3H5. Fleose send 5 AC fordeimK 



(CH.CHt.M IK ATARI USI.H 
CiROUP 

Con(at.l Mike 1 lanrlMjn r 172, rlarWfdi 
Road., Colchester, Essex, C04 3DD. 
Meets fortnightly, supports all Atari sys- 
tems, Tel. 0206 867931 or 0206 42900 

FaST (Fast ST Basic Users 
Group) 

Contact Simon Rush, 42 York Road, 
Rayleigh, Essex, 5S6 SSB. Tutorials in 
Basic and tiSOOQ. SAE Far full details. 

FLOPPVSHOP ST 

i: ~ : i s 1 1 : j -. I \-h-\-i Pi-laney r 50. Slewart Cres- 
Cifttj Nurthfit'ld. Abtrdlewi, AB2 5SH. 
TeL 0214 o91B24. 

Tht GATEWAY CLUB 

Contact Phil Heiherer, 164d Raddiffe 
l^jud, Luki^nhen-jtla, Suffolk. TeL. (Erls- 
wH]} 2^6^. All to-rnpuler tlub with Atari 
-'i i km Meets once a motith- 

LACE (LONDON ATARI 
COMPUTER ENTHUSIASTS) 

Contort Glenn leader, 143 Richmond 
Road r Leytonstane r London, It 1 ^BT. 
Fel 01 SW 0395, XI..XE, ST uRers. Great 
newikner and rp library 

LUGS (LEEDS USER GROUP) 

Contact Dave on 0532 717712 anytime. 
1050. 3 10, cassette users welcome. Send 
SAL to P.O. Box TR7. Leeds, W. Votti 
L_Sl2*rci 



LVALC (LEA VALLEY ATARI 

IJMH& CROUP 

Contact Mall lyderrmrl. 125 Codmora 
Lane, ChusuunS. Hcrls. LN& 9fH. RL^yu- 
lor meetings and newslelter, 8/16 bit. 

MACCLESFIELD COMPUTER 

CLUB 

Ojnlad Peter Sc-kim&n. Tel. 0625 207RZ 

evenings and W**kftflds, All MmpUt*1 

club wilh Atari section, Mc^ts lort- 
niyKtly. 

MERSEYSIDE ATARI CLUB 

Contact MLke Lynch, 24, Ckaxdene Rood, 
AnfleJdj Liverpool., XlerseysSc*e, L4 2SR. 
hlo.=.l 7M Wtf.N t.JNL.V. Ki-yulor 
mcctinuv. KliWSlitttr and rrnjiL-. 

NORTHERN ITALY ST FANS 

Contort Carlo Eianchini, Viale Ar^onne 
12, 27100PAVIA T lmfy 

ROCHDALE ATARI COMPU- 
TER ENTHUSIASTS (RACE.) 
Contort The Secretary. P.O fex I, Roch- 
dale. Lanes OL 12 8TQ. SAE uppnx; ■ 1 1 ■ ■- 1 
All Ataiis, meetings fortnighlly 

SIC. ATARI 

i. -.r ..! I til* nil I.^.ijiU-1, l-Y.i, K\>. Ilrrii;ild 

Road. Leyfonstone, London, Ell 4&L 
Tel 01 556 0395. Fur thc^c inlerralea" in 

more unusual applications. 



STARLIGHT ATARI CLUB 

Contad DtKiglaa wriuiKiuk, n, i.ihnaifd 
Road, R'tkhuni, LLmdt>n S115 1P.U. Td, 
01 639 3 10? after 5 pm. Members With 
disl drives (8 bit'}. 

ST CLUB 

Conrad Paul Glover, P.O. fkra 20, Hert- 
ford, Si 3. SNN. Mall onlyc?). Worldwide. 

VTB ATARI COMPUTER CLUB 

Conlact Chrisliun Delabarre., hekslruut 
7, 9050 Evergem, Belgium. TeL 
091/26 J9 29 For Kl r XE,ST. Organised 
latks, vlsI tfi etc. 

WOHIl) ATAHl PENPALS Inf. 
User -Group (WAP| 

Contact MtiK Tcn^wn. Mnycrhoryl 6, 
Alphcn ui'd Rijn. 2402 LP. The Nether- 
lands. TeL 01720 45583. Members in 
USA, Canada, France, U.K., Greece, Ger- 
many, Saudi Arabia. Have circulating 
disk |B*tjiv and ST). Mall only. 

Do ?QU want Qthew JO Jena* atar jaw 
group/ irrrd tferarJs as arx>we ONLY i-5 
words max. on Members!} on a ptain sheet 
of paper headed RESOURCE FiLE - Lr5£fi 
CROUPS. That's all you geil We will not 
puMixh any oihef details- as meeting times 
ond plates t?tid to < kongt , 



BBS 



Name: THE VILLAGE 
Number: 01 464 2516 
Hours: 24 Hours/ 7 davs 
Baud: V2 1 r V22 r V22r31 5, V23 
F&Qture^: 8 bit ar&o, ST area, CP/M 
or*a 

Name: INEOMATlQUE 

N u mber: 000 1 764 9 4 2 {Dub] in) 

Hours: 24 Hours 

Baud: 300/300 And 75/ 1000 

Features: ATAR.I 5IG and program 

Hbrqiy 

Nnme: LIH I S 1 1 K L1TSI1 RAL 

Number: 0533 700914 
Hours: 24 Hours 
Baud: 300 and 1200/75 

Features: fl bit area and ST area 



Nnme: CMARLV 

Number: 0451/31642 Germany 

010/49/45 1/3164 2 from England 
Hours: 24 Hours/7 days 

Baud: 300, Snl 

Features: Atari S-bit and ST areas. 
P.D. software. Some German 
required! 

Name: THE ARK 
Number: 021 353 54S6 
Hours: 24 Hours/ 7 days 
Baud: 300 or 1200:7.5 
Features: 8 bit with Downloads, 
bints, .swops &tc. 

Name CRVSTAL TOWER BBS 

Number 01 &&& 281 3 
Hums; 24 Hours 
Baud: 300 to 2400 

Features: Atari section which 
needs your support! 



Name: THE GNOME AT HOME 

Number: 01 888 S894 
Hours: 24 Hours/ 7 days 
Baud: V 23 viewdata 
Features: ST area frame * 1632 .0ft. 
ST Babble starts on frame 
*1632.9* 

Nam?: CBABBS 

Number: 021 430 3761 

1 1 - - 1 : ra: 24 E i a UK/d Med Th u rs- 

davs 

Baud: 300 

Features: ST/8 bit. Email to USA 

and Canada 



PAGE 6 reserves the Tight 
to delete any entry from 
this feature for any 
reason. Inclusion does not 
imply any endorsement 
by PAGE 6 and PAGE 6 
can accept no responsibil- 
ity for the accuracy or 
completeness of an entry. 
Please tell us if you find 
any entry out of date + 



74 Page 6 - Issue 37 



520ST-FM SUPER PACK 




1Mb DISK DRIVE 
£450 OP SOFTWARE 

ARCADE GAMES 

Arfcancud IF I magma 

Beyond TTra lee Palace . E i:o 

Bl*ck Lamp Firebird 

Suggy Boy Elite 

Chopper X Mastertnonic 

Heart Winrler* Elite 

Marti® Madness Electron* Arts 

Quadfalien Logolrgp 

Ranarairia . Hawson Consultants 

Return To Genesis Firebird 

RoadwarB Melbourne House 

■Btarquake Mannar n 

TmI Drtva Electronic Arte 

Tnruil Firebird 

ThundercaEg Elite 

Wlzbail Ocean 

Xenon MfilODu™ House 

Zympt . . He^son ConsultenTa 



£1910$ 

£19:5* 
£9.M 

E14.45 

£19,95 
£19.95 
C18J6 
C19.95 
£19.95 
£24.95 
EMS 
£1M6 
£19.ft5 

119.99 



SPORTS SiMULATJQNS 



Tha Alan -Supaf Pjck :S m.ihhi fai irou if yau warn m q?i off in .? iiv.rg start 
w*|* the tHBl n ant#f1nlnni&.ir. wrthwr*. The »DC;i lncW*a 3 HOST-h m 
w*n v,Mn RAM, a buJMn 1M& 44k drrm ov*r LUO erf ifl-p Q*%na *id n 
jdyincfc II yw buy 1hn Sup^r P«* M Siiw Snap, wo Kill &d<j em ^^- .57 
Sfwnw KK |,mHh mm £3M|, Fjw D1 Ch4r*s. Return the aii^n Ifr ..yijjih 



Eddie Edwards Super Ski 
Seconds Cut 
Summer Olym-plad TIB 




. Elite E19.95 
Tynesott £19,95 
Tynesoft £TS.SS 

PHODUCrmTY SOFTWARE 

Organ lf*r Triangle Publishing £4fl.95 



JOYSTICK 



Alan CX4Q Joystick 



rtiiii Corp £4.99 



INCLUDING VAT 



FREE ATARI BUNDLE VALUE:£45ft97 



/Vrth SMI 24 mono monitor: £498 SS With SC1 224 colour m on itor: £69fl 



HOW WITH TV MODULATOR 

For lha srnn-ift home UB^r find U» arrmtl bUBlnefli. *rt ire- 
pleased to annwinDn- n new packaoe hasod nround Cfce 
T040ST-PM. Tne 104QST-FM hn IMbylB HAM nn-rJ a 
IMhvtt t>uiil-in disk dfive. l-n B4didQn. tftB 1H0E.T-rM 
rfcffw^&ines with a TV modular buill-in. ^The prev<Qualy 
jvwlaOle 1MQST-F was designed lor una with a monitor 
inly bh£ tfld 001 C0rT*e wilh a rnodublO* .) Tftis modulator 
allows iha 1U40ST-F io be pluggnd directly ffilo any 
domestic TV »n, haa comes, cornplHw with a lead to 
allnv. you to do So Thu new -Professional Pack from 
S liL-a include* 1he new 104OST-FM wilh modul-fltOr pits 
tour ttioh qualny sotiwaTe psckAO** including a spread- 
sheet. databSSe, word pnoceaaor and programming I^HQ- 
uagc. TSiig 'ProtesaiG-r^ai Pack' software will enable you fc? 
fler sl-aig-rt dawn to bUiTWSS wilh your new COfrspute*. In 
SddillOfl 10 this- software- i^oHb £364 £4), ff yny buy Pie 
PnofRssional Pack Trum Silica Ghrjp, y cu will alas racetva 
me Silica ST grafter Kit [wcirth tw»r «K». Frwt Oi 
Charge. Return U» DQupnn tor (UfllWr inForrnaticin 

£499 



INCLUDING UAT 



WH h SMI 24 mo no rnonitof: £598:; 
With SC1 224 colour mon itor: £798 ! 



ATARI 104&ST-FM r&lrnputerl £J99-W 

VIP PROFESSIONAL {Sprea^rxmi i ft 49,95 

MICROSOFT WRITE . ivvtedPiaoewj £149.95 
SUPERB ASE PERSONAL iDninha^ £59.95 
BASIC DISK A MANUAL ;l m-^gei £24.9fl 



NORMAL ftRP; ESB4.82 
LE55 DISCOUNT: -£385.82 



PROFESSIONAL PACK PftlCE: £499.00 



2Mb & 4MD MEGA ST 



The MESA ST cornpuber* are Myled as as, UghlweighL k^ybua/d wrlh a sepsrste CPb 
COWecifrd by a cdi^ rtlaphanfl Style Cable- Thprp prg two ^rtians of tfis LllrfiA ST 
on? wilh JMbylEH o^ HAW anrj the OHier wilh ^Mbylw. Each vefBlor" has a l^bylu 
ckjub:* sirtafl tmk drive builL-m id tha CPU i/iilt. The MEGA ST* do rxrt corfw with 
fnaduiaior t-uill-in and nvjat IherelOre be ua«d Will* 4 monitor. VYHh a^ry M6&A 3T 
pyrchsaed, we will add ^he 'Proleaalonal Pack" inttwflra (wonh iSM.Kty derailed 



above, pl y g lbs Sil- 
ica ST Slartar Ki 
[^orih over £300;. 
octfi Free Qf Ore roa. 

fletu*ri the cgupgn 

irxiudher details. 



2Mb MEGA ST 



+ mono monitor 
+ colour moniiaf = 



£fiae 

£1198 



4Mb MEGA ST 

£1199 

^iriono monitor = £1298 
"Colour mon itor -£1490 




DTP PageStream £149 



-VAT 
£17136 



D«k1ap Pjhl^hii^, <[>TPj is nra at H-* hMrap giowr^ jppAcalkmi t& panomd 
cemputtra !«* *f* PWmiI to anncunK* « ftrmwhj* Km cos? pneaaca ro4 inn Aim, ST 
calw Pagc^rMrr. P«^S|ri«arn KHto crty L1^B (*WT-tllrLai{ ana, bo^im ii 
wo-Ki «iiH-. an Aswl 1I145S" antf a feKosfu HP TttA.- prtrftor, pr>u Hfcn b* 4tfi flfl* 
njiiriiiiii *ill-- a ramptatfl 4ys«fT7 for teas ^w £1000 S<im« <il 1ha ^mIutm aI 
PlSSSlrfrin! jra Iubw to Iha riahL I* >txj vmuU Ilk* furn^i infD*mahcri ca 1hl* 
pfqgftm, g.-5 * ru li*a jrd ralwn Ih* cc^pcni betm. Hcklrtg rr^ T1TP- bw in Ihe Darnw . 




1 TEXT-FLQW ABOUND GHAPHKS 
1 RDTATIQW OF TfXT P. GRAPHIC& 

1 Slant or twist any 0Bj&€t 

5 n POtTSCHIPT COMPATIBLE 
\ ■ TAG fLHCTIOH 

AUTO.MAWUAL KEHhllhlCJ * HVPrtfiNATION 

CSROLnftKCi OF OBJECTS 




SX COMPUTERS 

The range of Atari &T compulers offers something for e^ryofle. Frarn the game* tfftthftftjri 
who warns (he challenge or me v&y beet w arcade a^iirjn. in the buamessmstn i^ho wants ^o 
■r,;i-:i: : financial Forecasts or Faulllaaa. pf^cntaliorts. The &T orr^r^ high qualKy graphics 
sound and speed tor the gamer, ^hiist providing a i«t, user friendly and afr^rdable solution 
!o business. The ST is now firrnty astafclished in Ihe home erhvirOfiment and boasts a wealth 
o* users in flducation, seal soMernmenl, talavlsson, and a variety of dilfenjnt busiflasses 
Software for the range strfl-irjhes 1o cov^r applications as d\v&m te ENTERTAINMENT 
ACCOUNTS ART, COMMUNICATIONS, COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN, DATABASES' 
DESKTOP PUBLISHING EDUCATION, MUSIC. PROGRAMMING, SPREADSHEETS, SoS 
PROCES3ING r]ind more. For a full list of 1he aoftware available, as weH as details of the ST 
rajifl*, cpTipleie and return the coupon betow. AiprtDUMma* ftpft^sfj^nj^aEit^ 



520ST-FM EXPLORER PACK 

WITH BUILT-IN 1Mb DISK DRIVE 





Tne value r&r money pff^ned by lha Atari ST nafirja is raflected in t.h* Explarar Pack 
1ea1urtng the E2DST-FWI computer with 512K RAM. The S30ST-FM computer now 
comes wi^h a buINn 1 Mb double sideri disk drive as vyetl as a tree mouw O0r>Lroller 
and a buttHn TV morJuPator. The new 520ST-FM ExplOfer Pack indud« the 52QST- 
FM comrxitar, ttia arcade gama Ranarama, a lutorial program and some useful 
dusktcp accessciriea In addition, H you boy the Explorer P^axrk from Sitlca wa will 
Bfvb you ir*e SiPita ST Slarter K.H worlri over O00, FREE OF CHARGE Ralum thp 
coupon tiff details of our .Starter Kit and of trie full ST range 

£260 




*VAT= 

£299 



+ SM124 mono monilor: £398 55 



- SC1224 colour monitor: E59B 5S 



WHY SILICA SHOP? 



flnrcfn voj ikicidfr wftan \q twy your nsw tan &T 
fjOmputaf ■*? ELgSjeal v^u tunatur vnr>'^r-n1ulh/ WHERE 
yflu buv i Tfwfn jitj MAT4Y COmjaniai who ten otfef 
yrju ^ computer, a few peretigrglE. y>d ift£ itx? Icr snl rg 
MUnr. Thfrig ^kb FEWER ca-gi«nKg whrj tan Olfcr u whin 
fanga of pr^Jucrg h^ ye^ Ciimpular jrd ftipe#t **ioe 
*tk! telp whan yau need it Thfra i± Otfl_Y r>JE 
oampany isto tin grOvidfl Ihn Lmnje^ rgn^e y 1 Alan ST 
mlaiad product ir the L^, S Aj| lima Atwi ^r apetflliit 
IfrdWfcal fmpint and m-derrfi erter &J» auppon;. inc- 
Udiig 1rw re*3luT1ur3 and tin^hjnH, dfllwed In ypur 
d6df lar is Kjng BE- yOu require- ahaf ! ^ou purchase yixjp 
COrflpuiSr Thai cc* erMnp*^ ■£> Silica Shop. W^ haw 
b«r ealBtHrltlgd in lira hcrnt Q^mDUtBr he O Ilt tw >wirs 
wll an annual lurno^w in hjkcs nl S3J mdlon ft'rf t^ 
row Cldim Id .-mat <jnr cuEWrn*-fi iwurcmrjnl? *iih .^ 
ar^jnjc!^ And uiicwstardi>] ■t-ich if s^urtc Eg ngnn 
But dnnl (uh 1fiie w - ware Inr t. Qjinp+ew *kI rrturr, 
Vt± eaupcri l^lrjw Iq- Ouf lalesl l^eralur* ^id bejf\ 10 
aioerienct if* 5 ma $hop apeoaiial Auin HrwDd 



ffH.^CA 5Wr?TEff r¥/r: Wijrih rj. Er EDO, FHEF 
wilh Hi^ry A-Ujn ST compdlAr rmiji/ii Imm Sikca. 
PWOF^SSl/CWAr. fl*Ot Fi"« uub«m* sanikDr* 
w-in sMOS^-rM and MEEtA F>T'^ bought Irnm Sllku. 
OCnVATED SERViCOta ? tu[-\ lim Alan Irainwl 
Siialt w^i fcnn o' *-pc-if: r ir.o cm j.ihi ■$•*■■* ztq 

THE FVU STOCK fUMQE: Ml a | ynur ALwi 
k^.iiihii-hii^ from cmplocA 
^FTfff MLf S SUPPORT} The *t*t1 at 8m « 
iimin^ltd Id help you 9«i ihe Iwsl! ^rum yGur E-T. 
FREE CA7XLOGiJE$: MRHti dir«fl Id yaur hcrviy 
■m siHwi jn we prnl c^Him, iHHiung uriens as *ftll 
f. ii itI il-^ lie* rrfeasK 

flrelE■O^CfliWdy*TJ3e4rreflT:■ On all hard.flre 

rrilHr*. xliiuped Wfirt Ihfl LJK ni|nlgnd 

W^7f ttirCw Pn-CWWSE- W* will mulch cr^v- 
hIiIi.i -■ on a urc p/i?diH::| hr-« priDE-' has*<; 
fnTf TECHNICAL HELflLfftE- t-.. s l Tim* tWfl al 
Alar lechnicjl fl^iwift ul^yi-al ycty aarvifj^ 



FREE SILICA STARTER KIT 
WORTH OVER £200 

WITH EVERY ST - RETURN COUPON FOR DETAILS 
ALL PRICES QUOTED INCLUDE FREE UK DELIVERY 



I yi>.i fll-eady Own an Alan ST cwipurer And would lika ^ t» reflliSlerad on nur nMll|r>fj I.E:| arsan 
cI« K ^'?I SjES"- W * W '" ^ P' 9Med 10 MM TV" ca P iR ^ h our pr^u listi ard nnw 5 leiteri 
FPEr OF CKARCt » -1-j.y OflOOnie sum l;ihk CompleLe iNa coupon nne r«um it rx> our Sidr;up 
Pfpnrji BPd begifi HBpehEtficinfl a specialiSI ST jarwee th«l 13 aeconc Id r>nnn 



SILICA SHOP 



SIDCUF C& Mail Order) Ol-3Qd ill! 

J-4 The Mews r Hafherf&y Road, Skfcvp, Kant, DA14 4DX 
OPEN: MOM-SAT 9am - 5.30pm LATE MGHT: f- HiQAY 9arn - Tpm 



LONDON ... Ol-SSp 4000 

5^ Tottenham Court Rosd T London. h/7P OBA 
I OPEN: MQN SA 7 9. 3Qu!.>} - GjtMpm LATE NIGHT: flfpfi/E 



LONDON 01-62S 1234 ext SSl-t 

. b&Nrxd&H* ftst floor}, Oxford Street, Lon&ori, WiA JAB 

^ OPEtV. MCrtV-SAT Jtom fi VCpm LATE MtQHTt THURSDAY Aam - &pm , 



To: Silica Shop Ltd, Depl PSJX 04S9 1-4 Ttie MeMvs, Haitierley Road, Sidcup, Ken(, DA14 4DX 

PLEASE SEND FREE LITERATURE ON THE ATARI ST 

Mr/rV)rs./M3: Initials; .......... Surname; 



A-ddress: 



Postcode; 

Do ■yvQu already -own a compHjier 
J[l SO, which one flrj yOu 0wn7 DTP 



rppj 



PAGE 6 ACCESSORY SHOP 

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lilHH 






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prices from C2.5Q 



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Every Imaginable 
dust cover 






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Telephone 078521 3 9 28 Catalog HOTLINE 0785 570O5